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Old January 4th 19, 04:06 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com



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Old January 4th 19, 05:21 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then
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Old January 5th 19, 05:41 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".
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Old January 5th 19, 05:59 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 13,892
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 11:41:40 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


I wonder how that came about...

1 - "Holy crap...there ain't no big logs left. We better improve the cutting
process."

or

2 - "We've improved the cutting process so much we can start using smaller
logs."
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Old January 5th 19, 06:01 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 5,724
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On 1/4/19 10:41 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


True, but they are fast growth, sustainable, forest trees.
More wood, faster than the old growth stuff.
Easier to harvest and transport, too.
Supposedly yields better grain and less variation in density, etc.
Plus, you're not cutting down 300 year old trees.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com




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Old January 5th 19, 06:29 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 23:01:52 -0600, -MIKE-
wrote:

On 1/4/19 10:41 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


True, but they are fast growth, sustainable, forest trees.
More wood, faster than the old growth stuff.


True, but no "but". That's the whole point.

Easier to harvest and transport, too.
Supposedly yields better grain and less variation in density, etc.
Plus, you're not cutting down 300 year old trees.


Yep.
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Old January 5th 19, 07:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,047
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

-MIKE- on Fri, 4 Jan 2019 23:01:52 -0600 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
On 1/4/19 10:41 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


True, but they are fast growth, sustainable, forest trees.
More wood, faster than the old growth stuff.
Easier to harvest and transport, too.
Supposedly yields better grain and less variation in density, etc.


Unfortunately, not as strong as clear beams cut from old growth
timber.

Plus, you're not cutting down 300 year old trees.


I looked up Western Red Cedar, planning to plan a couple trees at
the old place. Very popular for decking, shingles, siding, etc. As I
recall, _minimum_ commercial size is 75 years. 100 years is better.
But they do tend to take up a lot of room. I figured, by that time, it
would not be my problem B-).

tschus
pyotr

--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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Old January 5th 19, 07:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,047
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

DerbyDad03 on Fri, 4 Jan 2019 20:59:30 -0800
(PST) typed in rec.woodworking the following:
On Friday, January 4, 2019 at 11:41:40 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:
On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8
Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then

3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


I wonder how that came about...

1 - "Holy crap...there ain't no big logs left. We better improve the cutting
process."

or

2 - "We've improved the cutting process so much we can start using smaller
logs."


Yes. When you start to run out of "easy to process" stock, you
start looking at ways to make do with the stock you have.

It was the recognition that they couldn't depend on "wild" trees
that lead Georgia Pacific, Weyerhaeuser, et al, to start farming their
own trees. And to start coming up with wood products from "lesser
trees"; e.G., making OSB, or using cottonwood or alder for "pulp".

Right now, there is a glut of pine in the South. Seems that 30
years ago, a lot of people planted pine trees as part of their
retirement plan. But when the trees became "ripe" twenty years later,
there was an economic downturn. Nobody wanted logs. Now, ten years
after, those trees are "too big" for the mills (which were optimized
for 20 year old trees, not the much bigger 30 year old trees.). So a
lot of people are selling "good lumber" trees for "pulp" or firewood.
Because there is no market for them as raw lumber.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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Old January 5th 19, 08:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 5,724
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

On 1/5/19 12:53 PM, pyotr filipivich wrote:
-MIKE- on Fri, 4 Jan 2019 23:01:52 -0600 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
On 1/4/19 10:41 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then
3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


True, but they are fast growth, sustainable, forest trees.
More wood, faster than the old growth stuff.
Easier to harvest and transport, too.
Supposedly yields better grain and less variation in density, etc.


Unfortunately, not as strong as clear beams cut from old growth
timber.


Fortunately, they don't have to be as strong.
The stuff for construction that used to be solid lumber is now mostly
engineered lumber.


Plus, you're not cutting down 300 year old trees.


I looked up Western Red Cedar, planning to plan a couple trees at
the old place. Very popular for decking, shingles, siding, etc. As I
recall, _minimum_ commercial size is 75 years. 100 years is better.
But they do tend to take up a lot of room. I figured, by that time, it
would not be my problem B-).


I love the Western Red Cedar I used on my patio.
It's beautiful, a joy to work with, strong, aromatic, and did I mention,
beautiful? :-)
I wonder how old the tree was that gave it to me... hopefully, the patio
will be around as long or longer.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com


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Old January 6th 19, 05:43 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 3,047
Default Making Plywood: Then vs. Now

-MIKE- on Sat, 5 Jan 2019 13:53:48 -0600 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
On 1/5/19 12:53 PM, pyotr filipivich wrote:
-MIKE- on Fri, 4 Jan 2019 23:01:52 -0600 typed
in rec.woodworking the following:
On 1/4/19 10:41 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 3 Jan 2019 20:21:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 10:06:22 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
Not much has changed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF5LVBW1vl8


Not much other than...

1 - How many fewer people it takes now vs. then
2 - How many fewer chances to be killed or maimed now vs. then
3- How much smaller the useful logs are. The logs going into the
"now" are about the same size as the waste coming out of the "then".


True, but they are fast growth, sustainable, forest trees.
More wood, faster than the old growth stuff.
Easier to harvest and transport, too.
Supposedly yields better grain and less variation in density, etc.


Unfortunately, not as strong as clear beams cut from old growth
timber.


Fortunately, they don't have to be as strong.
The stuff for construction that used to be solid lumber is now mostly
engineered lumber.


Plus, you're not cutting down 300 year old trees.


I looked up Western Red Cedar, planning to plan a couple trees at
the old place. Very popular for decking, shingles, siding, etc. As I
recall, _minimum_ commercial size is 75 years. 100 years is better.
But they do tend to take up a lot of room. I figured, by that time, it
would not be my problem B-).


I love the Western Red Cedar I used on my patio.
It's beautiful, a joy to work with, strong, aromatic, and did I mention,
beautiful? :-)
I wonder how old the tree was that gave it to me... hopefully, the patio
will be around as long or longer.


I also found out that "Western Cedar" isn't a cedar, but a member
of the arborvitae family. "Cool".
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?


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