UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 01:51 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,129
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions


Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw I’ve developed a bit of a
serious “hunter-gather” habit.

Earlier this week I got some nice freshly cut oak to add to my collection
that was easy to split, possibly because of its “greenness”. Yesterday I
found a large bough from an ash tree (that’s been down for an indeterminate
time).

The wood still feels quite moist (and 35% humidity on my cheap meter for
whatever that’s worth) but it’s a ******* to split! Out of all the wood
I’ve collected it’s been the hardest so far which was a bit of a surprise
to me. It just laughs at my log splitting axe! (These are 14-18” diameter
slices). Is this typical for ash? Might not bother collecting too much
more of it if it’s all gonna be so tough.

As an aside, it’s often said that green ash still burns well. I’ve no
intention of burning it before it’s a lot drier but I’m curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.

Regarding wood types, I’ve avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which won’t clag up
the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls

  #2   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 02:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 8,422
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On 13 Jun 2019 12:51:57 GMT, Tim+ wrote:


Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw Ive developed a bit of a
serious hunter-gather habit.


It can get you like that eh. ;-)

Earlier this week I got some nice freshly cut oak to add to my collection
that was easy to split, possibly because of its greenness. Yesterday I
found a large bough from an ash tree (thats been down for an indeterminate
time).

The wood still feels quite moist (and 35% humidity on my cheap meter for
whatever thats worth) but its a ******* to split! Out of all the wood
Ive collected its been the hardest so far which was a bit of a surprise
to me. It just laughs at my log splitting axe! (These are 14-18 diameter
slices). Is this typical for ash? Might not bother collecting too much
more of it if its all gonna be so tough.


(Because of it's good burning characteristics) I've split quite a bit
of ash but have used a hydraulic (manual) splitter and not split much
else (esp oak) to compare it with. On my splitter I'd say that clean /
straight lengths of ash seem to split fairly easily?

As an aside, its often said that green ash still burns well. Ive no
intention of burning it before its a lot drier but Im curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.


Re the reputation, because you *can* burn it green (saves waiting for
it to season)?

Regarding wood types, Ive avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which wont clag up
the chimney with creosote)?


Pass.

Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?


I'll ask our daughter. She and her b/f at the time went to a *big* arb
show up near Peterborough and one of the stands had a 'guess the
species' display / competition, with several bits of tree, allowing
you to see the end grain and bark (and sometimes a leaf). They
carefully filled in an entry and put it in the box ... and checked at
the end and were told they had won. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
  #3   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 02:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 530
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On 13/06/2019 13:51, Tim+ wrote:

Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw I’ve developed a bit of a
serious “hunter-gather” habit.

Earlier this week I got some nice freshly cut oak to add to my collection
that was easy to split, possibly because of its “greenness”. Yesterday I
found a large bough from an ash tree (that’s been down for an indeterminate
time).

The wood still feels quite moist (and 35% humidity on my cheap meter for
whatever that’s worth) but it’s a ******* to split! Out of all the wood
I’ve collected it’s been the hardest so far which was a bit of a surprise
to me. It just laughs at my log splitting axe! (These are 14-18” diameter
slices). Is this typical for ash? Might not bother collecting too much
more of it if it’s all gonna be so tough.

As an aside, it’s often said that green ash still burns well. I’ve no
intention of burning it before it’s a lot drier but I’m curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.

Regarding wood types, I’ve avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which won’t clag up
the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?

Tim

Years ago, when I was a young man, my father used to go into the local
woods and "harvest" fallen trees. Ash burns quickly and strongly oak
slowly. He reckoned mixing the 2 gave the best fire. It was not long
after WW2, so coal was in quite short supply, so wood fires were the
only practical solution. It also supplied out hot water via a Back
boiler in the main fire place.
  #4   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 02:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2018
Posts: 802
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

T i m Wrote in message:
On Thu, 13 Jun 2019 14:09:49 +0100, Broadback
wrote:

snip

Ash burns quickly and strongly oak
slowly. He reckoned mixing the 2 gave the best fire.


I put a few chunks of my well seasoned split ash in a garden
incinerator and suspended a couple of trailer wheels over the top (on
a steel rod) that I needed to get the paint off.

Once lit, the whole thing was like a blast furnace, stripping the
paint in seconds! ;-)

Cheers, T i m



Eco credentials duly ruined...
--
Jim K


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
  #5   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 02:27 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 8,422
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On Thu, 13 Jun 2019 14:09:49 +0100, Broadback
wrote:

snip

Ash burns quickly and strongly oak
slowly. He reckoned mixing the 2 gave the best fire.


I put a few chunks of my well seasoned split ash in a garden
incinerator and suspended a couple of trailer wheels over the top (on
a steel rod) that I needed to get the paint off.

Once lit, the whole thing was like a blast furnace, stripping the
paint in seconds! ;-)

Cheers, T i m



  #6   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 02:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 953
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

Tim+ wrote:
As an aside, it’s often said that green ash still burns well. I’ve no
intention of burning it before it’s a lot drier but I’m curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.

Because it's naturally low in water content, I thought it was around
25% when newly felled but maybe that's a bit optimistic.


Regarding wood types, I’ve avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which won’t clag up
the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?

As long as the water content is low enough you can burn softwood OK,
it doesn't last as long as hardwood but no problem otherwise.

--
Chris Green
·
  #7   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 03:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 22,394
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On 13/06/2019 13:51, Tim+ wrote:

the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?


Usually when you cut into it, you can tell by the smell. Most locally
grown softwoods will tend toward pine / fir etc and have a distinctive
smell. (as does cedar, but that is less common here).

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #8   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 04:28 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 8,394
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On Thursday, 13 June 2019 13:52:02 UTC+1, Tim+ wrote:
Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw I’ve developed a bit of a
serious “hunter-gather” habit.

Earlier this week I got some nice freshly cut oak to add to my collection
that was easy to split, possibly because of its “greenness”. Yesterday I
found a large bough from an ash tree (that’s been down for an indeterminate
time).

The wood still feels quite moist (and 35% humidity on my cheap meter for
whatever that’s worth) but it’s a ******* to split! Out of all the wood
I’ve collected it’s been the hardest so far which was a bit of a surprise
to me. It just laughs at my log splitting axe! (These are 14-18” diameter
slices). Is this typical for ash? Might not bother collecting too much
more of it if it’s all gonna be so tough.

As an aside, it’s often said that green ash still burns well. I’ve no
intention of burning it before it’s a lot drier but I’m curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.

Regarding wood types, I’ve avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which won’t clag up
the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls


The reason for tarring is bad design of the stove.
If the combustion gases are cooled before combustion is complete, the combustion process stops. Unburned hydrocarbon vapours condense in the chimney (usually at the very top.)
Few stoves sold in the UK are properly designed, they are all about appearance.
  #9   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 04:37 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 8,394
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On Thursday, 13 June 2019 16:28:02 UTC+1, harry wrote:
On Thursday, 13 June 2019 13:52:02 UTC+1, Tim+ wrote:
Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw I’ve developed a bit of a
serious “hunter-gather” habit.

Earlier this week I got some nice freshly cut oak to add to my collection
that was easy to split, possibly because of its “greenness”. Yesterday I
found a large bough from an ash tree (that’s been down for an indeterminate
time).

The wood still feels quite moist (and 35% humidity on my cheap meter for
whatever that’s worth) but it’s a ******* to split! Out of all the wood
I’ve collected it’s been the hardest so far which was a bit of a surprise
to me. It just laughs at my log splitting axe! (These are 14-18” diameter
slices). Is this typical for ash? Might not bother collecting too much
more of it if it’s all gonna be so tough.

As an aside, it’s often said that green ash still burns well. I’ve no
intention of burning it before it’s a lot drier but I’m curious as to why
it has this reputation/property.

Regarding wood types, I’ve avoided collecting any softwoods but are there
any softwoods that are okay to burn in a log burner (which won’t clag up
the chimney with creosote)? Lastly, is there any easy way to identify soft
vs hard if you come across a felled tree with no branches or leaves to aid
identification, I.e. when you only have the bark and wood to go on?

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls


The reason for tarring is bad design of the stove.
If the combustion gases are cooled before combustion is complete, the combustion process stops. Unburned hydrocarbon vapours condense in the chimney (usually at the very top.)
Few stoves sold in the UK are properly designed, they are all about appearance.


There's a bit here on high efficiency wood stoves
https://woodstoves.net/blog/post/bur...nd-efficiently
  #10   Report Post  
Old June 13th 19, 05:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,229
Default OT: Firewood splitting/burning qualities questions

On 13/06/2019 13:51, Tim+ wrote:

Since we got our log burner and my chainsaw I’ve developed a bit of a
serious “hunter-gather” habit.


1. I broke three ribs trying to liberate a large piece of tree at the
side of the road.

2. I tried burning some railway sleepers. They had some stuff in them to
prevent burning. It didn't do that but it caused them to smoke, then the
smoke ignited all at once. It blew the stove door off and the pressure
wave smashed a window.

3. Always use a mechanical log splitter. An axe is ridiculous for a
never-ending job like making firewood.

4. Softwood is OK but it burns very quick.

5. Don't let the chainsaw blade get slack. And dip the tip in oil rather
than keep unblocking the oiler.

6. I got bored with all this palaver and switched to Calor Gas. Never
looked back.

Bill



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Firewood Cutting and Splitting george [dicegeorge] UK diy 5 July 16th 11 10:30 PM
Serious Question - Why am I splitting firewood [email protected] Home Repair 26 May 20th 11 04:57 AM
burning old firewood mm Home Repair 3 April 12th 08 07:28 PM
Burning green/wet firewood Ook Home Repair 21 November 5th 06 02:52 AM
Firewood smell in basement when burning wood on first floor. [email protected] Home Ownership 4 December 17th 04 04:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:19 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017