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Question Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

Hi all,

I'm basically planning on buying a shed, and converting it to an office. I know that its likely cheaper to just build the whole thing yourself, but I really am not confident that I could do that, so have decided to go down the conversion route.

I'd like to start with something like this: Suvi 212 Log Cabin - Summerhouses & Log Cabins - Garden Sheds & Buildings -Gardens - Wickes or this: http://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co....fice-Log-Cabin

Which I'll then insulate, and basically I want the final finish to be plaster-boarded internal walls, with a good thick insulation all around, ad I'll be working in it year-round.

The annoying thing is that pretty much every 'high-street' shed is really awful quality, and very expensive. However at this stage I'm not sure I could undertake a self-designed/self-built one as I have never done anything like this before.

I'm really looking for some advice, mainly for the insulation and damp proofing. From my understanding, if I take a box-standard shed like the one linked to above, is the following correct?

1. Wrap the internal walls , roof and floor in a damp-proof material such as celotex. (How do I go about venting this, and does the air vent just need to go through the celotex, or all the way through the internal plasterboard?)

2. Add battens as you normally would for a wall, get internal wiring in place, so the electrician can then just hook it up to the shed's fuse box (the electrician will be doing all the stuff he has to, but I'd be ok putting the plug sockets in place ready for him)

3. Insulate the walls (at this stage I have no idea what type of insulation I should be using. Advice?

4. Add plasterboards over insulation and fix in place.

5. Roof: Add insulation (again, no idea what type) followed by plasterboards

6. Floor: Add internal batters, with insulation, followed by ply (or should it be mdf?) flooring, which will be covered with laminate at the end.

7. Door: Once the floor has (I assume) been rased due to the internal insulation, I'm guessing a few inches will need lopping off the bottom.

I could have this all majorly wrong so any advice would be appreciated greatly. I've been searching high and low for some decent info, but a lot of the places only cover US sheds, and while there are a few similarities, the construction of them seems very different with a 'farm barn' style that we dont really have in the UK.

Getting back onto the subject of a completely custom / diy one. I think the biggest problems I have is A) the plans and B) the roof. I'd have no idea how to plan it, and I'd be worried that the roof wouldn't be strong enough.
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:
Hi all,

I'm basically planning on buying a shed, and converting it to an office.
I know that its likely cheaper to just build the whole thing yourself,
but I really am not confident that I could do that, so have decided to
go down the conversion route.

I'd like to start with something like this: 'Suvi 212 Log Cabin -
Summerhouses& Log Cabins - Garden Sheds& Buildings -Gardens - Wickes'
(http://www.wickes.co.uk/suvi-212-log-cabin/invt/218595/) or this:
http://tinyurl.com/7a3radx

Which I'll then insulate, and basically I want the final finish to be
plaster-boarded internal walls, with a good thick insulation all around,
ad I'll be working in it year-round.

The annoying thing is that pretty much every 'high-street' shed is
really awful quality, and very expensive. However at this stage I'm not
sure I could undertake a self-designed/self-built one as I have never
done anything like this before.

I'm really looking for some advice, mainly for the insulation and damp
proofing. From my understanding, if I take a box-standard shed like the
one linked to above, is the following correct?

1. Wrap the internal walls , roof and floor in a damp-proof material
such as celotex. (How do I go about venting this, and does the air vent
just need to go through the celotex, or all the way through the internal
plasterboard?)

2. Add battens as you normally would for a wall, get internal wiring in
place, so the electrician can then just hook it up to the shed's fuse
box (the electrician will be doing all the stuff he has to, but I'd be
ok putting the plug sockets in place ready for him)

3. Insulate the walls (at this stage I have no idea what type of
insulation I should be using. Advice?

4. Add plasterboards over insulation and fix in place.

5. Roof: Add insulation (again, no idea what type) followed by
plasterboards

6. Floor: Add internal batters, with insulation, followed by ply (or
should it be mdf?) flooring, which will be covered with laminate at the
end.

7. Door: Once the floor has (I assume) been rased due to the internal
insulation, I'm guessing a few inches will need lopping off the bottom.

I could have this all majorly wrong so any advice would be appreciated
greatly. I've been searching high and low for some decent info, but a
lot of the places only cover US sheds, and while there are a few
similarities, the construction of them seems very different with a 'farm
barn' style that we dont really have in the UK.

Getting back onto the subject of a completely custom / diy one. I think
the biggest problems I have is A) the plans and B) the roof. I'd have no
idea how to plan it, and I'd be worried that the roof wouldn't be strong
enough.


Where is this going to be installed? Have you bottomed out all the
Planning and Building regs issues?
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:

I'm basically planning on buying a shed, and converting it to an office.
I know that its likely cheaper to just build the whole thing yourself,


Its often more expensive to build yourself, but usually because you
would not pare down the material specs to the same minimal levels as
used by commercial producers.

but I really am not confident that I could do that, so have decided to
go down the conversion route.


It not actually that difficult to diy...

I'd like to start with something like this: 'Suvi 212 Log Cabin -
Summerhouses& Log Cabins - Garden Sheds& Buildings -Gardens - Wickes'
(http://www.wickes.co.uk/suvi-212-log-cabin/invt/218595/) or this:
http://tinyurl.com/7a3radx

Which I'll then insulate, and basically I want the final finish to be
plaster-boarded internal walls, with a good thick insulation all around,
ad I'll be working in it year-round.


ok...

The annoying thing is that pretty much every 'high-street' shed is
really awful quality, and very expensive. However at this stage I'm not
sure I could undertake a self-designed/self-built one as I have never
done anything like this before.


Sounds a bit like the first workshop I did:

http://www.internode.co.uk/workshop/phase3.htm

I'm really looking for some advice, mainly for the insulation and damp
proofing. From my understanding, if I take a box-standard shed like the
one linked to above, is the following correct?

1. Wrap the internal walls , roof and floor in a damp-proof material
such as celotex. (How do I go about venting this, and does the air vent
just need to go through the celotex, or all the way through the internal
plasterboard?)


Celotex are makers of a insulation product (well several in fact). They
specialise in PIR (Polyisocyanurate) Foam, which is a ridgid foam that
give very high insulation values. Often foil coated on one side or both
(for better radiant heat reflection and also as a vapour barrier).

You basically want a vapour barrier any place that warm moist air from
in the building could reach the cold fabric of the building. (where it
could condense and cause rot). You could either rely on the foil on the
insulation (and use a foil tape to cover all the joints), or could use a
plastic membrane like Visqueen sheet (cheap from a builders merchant)
which you could fix under the plasterboard.

The outside of the shed is unlikely to be airtight, so you could leave a
small gap between the cladding and the insulation to allow some airflow
on that side (to allow the cladding to dry on the inside).

If its for year round use you will also need to think about heating and
possibly cooling. A split unit air conditioner / heat pump might be the
solution, since it will heat, cool, and maintain a comfortable humidity.
Or for a less sophisticated solution, and extractor fan, and a wall
mounted fan heater.

2. Add battens as you normally would for a wall, get internal wiring in
place, so the electrician can then just hook it up to the shed's fuse
box (the electrician will be doing all the stuff he has to, but I'd be
ok putting the plug sockets in place ready for him)


The wiring can be the last bit done before the plasterboard goes on...
you can cut a channel in the insulation and sit it in that such that
when the plasterboard goes on, the wires are in contact with the
plasterboard (this will allow them to shed heat better, and hence not
require such a significant de-rating due to the effects of being
insulated. (alternatively you could surface wire after the PB - depends
on how neat you want it)

3. Insulate the walls (at this stage I have no idea what type of
insulation I should be using. Advice?


PIR foam as above. 50mm of it will give you the same performance as
100mm of rockwool. Its also rigid enough that you can do away without
extra battens in many cases - screwing through the PB, then the
insulation and into the existing studs.

4. Add plasterboards over insulation and fix in place.

5. Roof: Add insulation (again, no idea what type) followed by
plasterboards


Same as the walls if you are going to do the underside of the apex
against the rafters. If installing a level ceiling, then you could layer
rockwool etc on top of that like a traditional loft. (only reall
advantage of that would be its slightly cheaper)

6. Floor: Add internal batters, with insulation, followed by ply (or
should it be mdf?) flooring, which will be covered with laminate at the
end.


No need for battens, the insulation will be not crush under the sheet
materials. 18mm WBP ply would be strong and durable.

7. Door: Once the floor has (I assume) been rased due to the internal
insulation, I'm guessing a few inches will need lopping off the bottom.


You need to be careful here, in that if you trim the bottom of the door,
you may also need to raise the threshold so that it still reaches it!

Depending on how the floor is done you could insulate under the whole
shed first.

Also note that heatloss through the floor will be less than elsewhere,
so you could use thinner insulating boards. It would also be worth
looking at Marmox boards - those are probably strong enough that you
could dispense with the wood layer on top, and put your laminate down
directly.

I could have this all majorly wrong so any advice would be appreciated
greatly. I've been searching high and low for some decent info, but a
lot of the places only cover US sheds, and while there are a few
similarities, the construction of them seems very different with a 'farm
barn' style that we dont really have in the UK.


You seem to be pretty much on the right track anyway...

Getting back onto the subject of a completely custom / diy one. I think
the biggest problems I have is A) the plans and B) the roof. I'd have no
idea how to plan it, and I'd be worried that the roof wouldn't be strong
enough.


If you can build a stud wall, then you can make a shed.

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Stud_wall

Various shed ideas:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Shed

What size is this going to be? Unless its going to be massive then its
unlikely to be an issue. Even 2x2 framing is likely to take the roof
weight and that of a adult climbing on it in most typical shed sizes.

I helped a former neighbour re-roof his garage once... that had 4x2
across the (nearly) 3m span on a flat roof and that was more than adequate.

Failing that, if in doubt, post your design ideas here, since plenty of
us have built similar things and will be able to comment from experience.




--
Cheers,

John.

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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

rmwebs wrote:
I'd be ok putting the plug sockets in place ready for him)


When discussing them in earshot of an electrician, be sure to call
them "sockets", then at least you'll get a brownie point for
starting off appearing to know what you're talking about.

There are things called plugs.

There are things called sockets.
(One more brownie point for calling them socket outlets, but
that's not essential)

There are no such things as plug sockets.

JGH
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice


"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:
Hi all,



Where is this going to be installed? Have you bottomed out all the
Planning and Building regs issues?


If it's in his (rear/side) garden, I don't think that there are any issues
provided that he doesn't convert it into something that is intended to be
slept in.

tim






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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

tim.... wrote:
"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:
Hi all,


Where is this going to be installed? Have you bottomed out all the
Planning and Building regs issues?


If it's in his (rear/side) garden, I don't think that there are any issues
provided that he doesn't convert it into something that is intended to be
slept in.

e.g.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17185294

staggering. Reminds me of Soweto.

tim






--
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To people who know too much, it is a sad fact
that they know how little is really possible -
and how hard it is to achieve it.
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 30/04/2012 14:30, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17185294

staggering. Reminds me of Soweto.


Cripes, bring the xray/infrared cameras out - that is very possibly
happening down my street!...

--
Adrian C
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Thanks for all the replies everyone, John your post was awesome and your shed/workshop looks great!

For planning regs I should be fine, its going in the back garden and will be under 2.5 meters. It wont take up anywhere near the 50% limit either.

I took a trip down to my local shed dealers (Millers Garden Buildings in St Albans) who had a really nice looking garden room with two double glazed windows and a double glazed door. It's basically exactly the kind of thing I'd be looking to create so I had a good look around it.

I've just got to get some sort of plan in place now!
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

In article ,
"tim...." writes:

"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:
Hi all,



Where is this going to be installed? Have you bottomed out all the
Planning and Building regs issues?


If it's in his (rear/side) garden, I don't think that there are any issues
provided that he doesn't convert it into something that is intended to be
slept in.


There are quite a few, but I don't think most people take any notice.
Unless it's built of non-combustible materials, it must be at least
1 metre from the house and 1 metre from all the property boundaries.
PP required if total area of sheds and decking reaches 50% or more of
original garden size (or something like this).
Limits on height before requiring PP.
Limits on floor area before requiring BR.
Limits in conservation areas.
More I've forgotten.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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That's pretty much as I understood it too. Although I dont think people really pay attention to the 1 meter from boundary. In fact I think pretty much everyone's sheds are likely up against the fence

I plan on having a gap around it, Ideally I want it close to the boundary so it'll be right at the 1 meter point, giving plenty of room to get around it to do treatment.

I found a couble of photos (all-be-it a very tiny one) of the 'garden room' offered by the local company I previously mentioned, the only difference is that the one photoed has a double door but it was displayed with a single (which I'd rather have). The single-door model had a slightly larger window, and an additional window on the side.

http://www.millersgardenbuildings.com/images/BIGFontwell%2012x10.jpg
http://www.millersgardenbuildings.com/images/BIGfontwell.jpg

It was offered with either 'standard cladding' or 'logleg cladding'. Both images above have the logleg cladding, no idea what standard would be. I assume some form of low-quality wood tho.

What do you think? It looked like a pretty simple building, surely all I'd have to do is effectively make the 4 wall frames, the floor base and the roof frame and screw them together then board up the outside with cladding, and then do all the damp proofing and other inside stuff.


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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 30/04/2012 15:20, rmwebs wrote:
Thanks for all the replies everyone, John your post was awesome and your
shed/workshop looks great!

For planning regs I should be fine, its going in the back garden and
will be under 2.5 meters. It wont take up anywhere near the 50% limit
either.

I took a trip down to my local shed dealers (Millers Garden Buildings in
St Albans) who had a really nice looking garden room with two double
glazed windows and a double glazed door. It's basically exactly the kind
of thing I'd be looking to create so I had a good look around it.


Now go back with your camera and tape measure, plans sorted ;-)

I've just got to get some sort of plan in place now!




--
Cheers,

John.

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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

Owain wrote:
On Apr 30, 5:14 am, jgharston wrote:
There are no such things as plug sockets.


surely they're what plug tops fit into ?


:-)

And it's not the end of the world.

I often have customers calling me saying their light socket does not work.

Part of my job is to find out what has actually failed whilst on the phone
to the customer.

--
Adam


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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

Owain wrote:
ARWadsworth*wrote:
I often have customers calling me saying their light socket does not work.
Part of my job is to find out what has actually failed whilst on the phone
to the customer.


I used to do that in IT.


When I worked in IT I'd get people saying "the keyboard's broken",
so I'd take a spare keyboard along to investigate, only to find
out that actually the /computer/ wasn't working.

Or "the computer's not working", while pointing at the monitor.

JGH
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 30/04/2012 21:21, rmwebs wrote:
Andrew Gabriel;2852951 Wrote:
In article ,
"tim...."
writes:-

"Roger Mills"
wrote in message
...-
On 29/04/2012 18:26, rmwebs wrote:-
Hi all,

-

Where is this going to be installed? Have you bottomed out all the
Planning and Building regs issues?-

If it's in his (rear/side) garden, I don't think that there are any
issues
provided that he doesn't convert it into something that is intended to
be
slept in.-

There are quite a few, but I don't think most people take any notice.
Unless it's built of non-combustible materials, it must be at least
1 metre from the house and 1 metre from all the property boundaries.
PP required if total area of sheds and decking reaches 50% or more of
original garden size (or something like this).
Limits on height before requiring PP.
Limits on floor area before requiring BR.
Limits in conservation areas.
More I've forgotten.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]


That's pretty much as I understood it too. Although I dont think people
really pay attention to the 1 meter from boundary. In fact I think
pretty much everyone's sheds are likely up against the fence

I plan on having a gap around it, Ideally I want it close to the
boundary so it'll be right at the 1 meter point, giving plenty of room
to get around it to do treatment.

I found a couble of photos (all-be-it a very tiny one) of the 'garden
room' offered by the local company I previously mentioned, the only
difference is that the one photoed has a double door but it was
displayed with a single (which I'd rather have). The single-door model
had a slightly larger window, and an additional window on the side.

http://www.millersgardenbuildings.com/images/BIGFontwell%2012x10.jpg
http://www.millersgardenbuildings.com/images/BIGfontwell.jpg

It was offered with either 'standard cladding' or 'logleg cladding'.


Loglap perhaps?

Both images above have the logleg cladding, no idea what standard would
be. I assume some form of low-quality wood tho.


Feather edge or shiplap presumably...

What do you think? It looked like a pretty simple building, surely all
I'd have to do is effectively make the 4 wall frames, the floor base and
the roof frame and screw them together then board up the outside with
cladding, and then do all the damp proofing and other inside stuff.


Yup...


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
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|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
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A little side though, maybe I'm reading this wrong, but the official planning regs information for shed-type structures says that the structure either has to be 1 metre from the boundary, or constructed of substantially non-combustible materials.

That's a pretty loose statement as the defenition of non-combustible materials just says "(e.g bricks, masonary, etc)". I did a bit of digging and found a post by a member of the Dorset planning office who seems to imply that as long as the structure is not using a clay / concrete tiled roof, it can be made from timber and be a non-combustible material.

Interpretation of 'non-combustible material' - dorsetforyou.com

I hate how they have the planning regs so vague! I was under the impression that ALL structures must be 1 metre away but this makes me doubt that now.

it's not a major issue either way as I want a gap around the edge to:
A) Stop the neighbours cat hopping over the fence and ripping up the felt (the shed that I'll be tearing down has been re-felted 3 times in 6 years due to the damn cat!)

B) Allow access to the sides to treat the wood, and to possibly add a solar-battery box hidden around the back at a later date. This will be for the extractor fan.

Oh and John - Yes, it was 'LogLap' I was writing it on the iPad and the damn autocorrect must have changed it!


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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 30/04/2012 23:57, Owain wrote:
On Apr 30, 10:50 pm, jgharston wrote:
When I worked in IT I'd get people saying "the keyboard's broken",
so I'd take a spare keyboard along to investigate, only to find
out that actually the /computer/ wasn't working.


That's what happens when you put computers on people's desks, instead
of locking them in computer rooms where they should be and giving
people microcode-loadable terminals over differential bidirectional
error-corrected twin coax links to a Wang VS.

Owain

Blast from the past. That twin coax was a pig though. I experimented
with 100m of shielded twisted pair - shields all commoned and the cores
connected to the twisted pair - it ran for months without a problem.
This was before Cat5 was common, of course.

For a 'green screen', Wang WP and Wang office was elegant.

--
Pete
Lose (rhymes with fuse) is a verb, the opposite of find. Loose (rhymes
with juice) is an adjective, the opposite of tight.
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

wrote:


A little side though, maybe I'm reading this wrong, but the official
planning regs information for shed-type structures says that the
structure either has to be 1 metre from the boundary, or constructed of
substantially non-combustible materials.


Technically true but go look around your roads - you will see it widely
disregarded.

Some common sense is worth applying - if the shed is next to a boundary and
next to someone's house, it would be a bit off to add to the risk of burning
their house down.

OTOH if the shed is down the bottom of the garden, the risk is mostly to the
fence (and maybe their shed). If their "shed" in this context is a workshop
full of expensive machinery, then be careful - if it's just full of
gardening tools, then low risk. Of course, if their shed sets your expensive
home-office on fire with all your paperwork and computers....

My take on this all is ignore if it's not next to their house and you do not
mind (too much) if the council tell you to move your shed.

If moving would be unfeasible, then I would tend to stick to the regs...

None of this is legally sound advice of course...
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

In article ,
Owain writes:
On Apr 30, 10:50*pm, jgharston wrote:
When I worked in IT I'd get people saying "the keyboard's broken",
so I'd take a spare keyboard along to investigate, only to find
out that actually the /computer/ wasn't working.

That's what happens when you put computers on people's desks, instead
of locking them in computer rooms where they should be and giving
people microcode-loadable terminals over differential bidirectional
error-corrected twin coax links to a Wang VS.


I've seen so many companies which really should be using Sunrays,
but are spending a fortune on having teams of people trying to
keep desktop PCs working. Compare with just one person looking after
all the unix servers and Sunrays.

--
Andrew Gabriel
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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Needsome advice

On 01/05/2012 10:04, rmwebs wrote:
A little side though, maybe I'm reading this wrong, but the official
planning regs information for shed-type structures says that the
structure either has to be 1 metre from the boundary, or constructed of
substantially non-combustible materials.

That's a pretty loose statement as the defenition of non-combustible
materials just says "(e.g bricks, masonary, etc)". I did a bit of
digging and found a post by a member of the Dorset planning office who
seems to imply that as long as the structure is not using a clay /
concrete tiled roof, it can be made from timber and be a non-combustible
material.

'Interpretation of 'non-combustible material' - dorsetforyou.com'
(http://www.dorsetforyou.com/398574)

I hate how they have the planning regs so vague! I was under the
impression that ALL structures must be 1 metre away but this makes me
doubt that now.


It seems to suggest you could do a timber building, with a tiles roof
and slap it on the boundary and be ok.

Having said that, you will find that this is a bit of "law" that is
pretty much universally ignored as far as I can tell - especially in
smaller gardens. (when I did my workshop, I read that, looked at every
other shed/workshop etc in the area, and noted that they were all of
similar construction and *all* slapped right up to the boundary. So that
was how I did mine - right next door to the neighbours shed - also
against the boundary)

it's not a major issue either way as I want a gap around the edge to:
A) Stop the neighbours cat hopping over the fence and ripping up the
felt (the shed that I'll be tearing down has been re-felted 3 times in 6
years due to the damn cat!)


If you use decent torch on felt, it won't suffer in the same way anyway.

B) Allow access to the sides to treat the wood, and to possibly add a
solar-battery box hidden around the back at a later date. This will be
for the extractor fan.

Oh and John - Yes, it was 'LogLap' I was writing it on the iPad and the
damn autocorrect must have changed it!


Yup, basically ship lap with a slightly rounded appearance...


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
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I've had a bit more info brought to me about the metre-from-fence rule. Apparently it either no longer applies, or isnt used in our area.

Even the official planning information for sheds doesn't mention it. All thy do mention is that if its within 2 metres of your boundary, that it has to be a maximum of 2.5 metres tall.

Take a look at the below links:
Planning Portal - Guide to the planning permission and permitted development regimes for outbuildings (Go to Slide 8)

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/upl...tbuildings.pdf (no mention of a metre rule)


Then from my local council:
http://www.stalbans.gov.uk/Images/A%20Householder's%20Guide%20to%20Permitted%20Devel opment%20Rights_tcm15-6596.pdf
and
St Albans City & District Council - Extensions, porches, conservatories, detached garages, summerhouses (skip down to the last bold heading).

Am I missing something here? :/


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Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

rmwebs (REMOVETHIS)rick.sketchy(AT)gmail.com(REMOVETHIS) wrote:

I've had a bit more info brought to me about the metre-from-fence rule.
Apparently it either no longer applies, or isnt used in our area.

Even the official planning information for sheds doesn't mention it. All
thy do mention is that if its within 2 metres of your boundary, that it
has to be a maximum of 2.5 metres tall.

Take a look at the below links:
'Planning Portal - Guide to the planning permission and permitted
development regimes for outbuildings' (http://tinyurl.com/62s88gd) (Go
to Slide 8)

http://tinyurl.com/69b3ekz (no mention of a metre rule)


Then from my local council:
http://www.stalbans.gov.uk/Images/A%20Householder's%20Guide%20to%20Permitted%20Devel opment%20Rights_tcm15-6596.pdf
and
'St Albans City & District Council - Extensions, porches,
conservatories, detached garages, summerhouses'
(http://tinyurl.com/7yhsey2) (skip down to the last bold heading).

Am I missing something here? :/


Yes, you are looking at planning legislation, but you also need
to consider compliance with Building Regulations.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.
  #22   Report Post  
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Posts: 4,453
Default Planning a Shed to Office conversion (with a new shed). Need some advice

Chris J Dixon wrote:

rmwebs (REMOVETHIS)rick.sketchy(AT)gmail.com(REMOVETHIS) wrote:

I've had a bit more info brought to me about the metre-from-fence rule.
Apparently it either no longer applies, or isnt used in our area.

Even the official planning information for sheds doesn't mention it. All
thy do mention is that if its within 2 metres of your boundary, that it
has to be a maximum of 2.5 metres tall.

Take a look at the below links:
'Planning Portal - Guide to the planning permission and permitted
development regimes for outbuildings' (http://tinyurl.com/62s88gd) (Go
to Slide 8)

http://tinyurl.com/69b3ekz (no mention of a metre rule)


Then from my local council:
http://www.stalbans.gov.uk/Images/A%20Householder's%20Guide%20to%20Permitted%20Devel opment%20Rights_tcm15-6596.pdf
and
'St Albans City & District Council - Extensions, porches,
conservatories, detached garages, summerhouses'
(http://tinyurl.com/7yhsey2) (skip down to the last bold heading).

Am I missing something here? :/


Yes, you are looking at planning legislation, but you also need
to consider compliance with Building Regulations.

Chris


Yes - it's a building regs thing...
--
Tim Watts
  #23   Report Post  
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Just thought I'd post a quick update. The shed has been built, insulated, etc and is having its electrics wired (Part P certified) next week!

I've been blogging about the entire process so that if any other DIY newbies ever plan on doing something similar, they can find out what I managed to cock up and how not to do it!

If anyone is interested I've got the blog up (and a large number of photos) he Building The Garden Office

(Note: There are no adverts or anything like that - I make no money from this)
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