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Default Anyone recomend where to buy a complete set for tiling.

I will be doing my first tiling next week.

Need to get everything to get me going. I've got my old DIY manuals
that explain what I need, eg. Float etc. But rather than adding each
item to my basket from screwfix. Is anyone away of a set that might be
better value from somewhere else ?

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Dave Jones
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
I will be doing my first tiling next week.

Need to get everything to get me going. I've got my old DIY manuals
that explain what I need, eg. Float etc. But rather than adding each
item to my basket from screwfix. Is anyone away of a set that might be
better value from somewhere else ?

All you need is a notched Trowel and a float or spreader (depending on what
size of area you are doing), I don't think it's worth buying any tile
cutters just for one job, you'd better off hiring a manual and a wet one
(essential) for the weekend or buying a cheap wet one (about 30) and sell
it on after use.


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Andrew Gabriel
 
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In article ,
"Dave Jones" writes:

wrote in message
oups.com...
I will be doing my first tiling next week.

Need to get everything to get me going. I've got my old DIY manuals
that explain what I need, eg. Float etc. But rather than adding each
item to my basket from screwfix. Is anyone away of a set that might be
better value from somewhere else ?

All you need is a notched Trowel and a float or spreader (depending on what
size of area you are doing), I don't think it's worth buying any tile
cutters just for one job, you'd better off hiring a manual and a wet one
(essential) for the weekend or buying a cheap wet one (about 30) and sell
it on after use.


Depends on the tiles. I bought a 10 tile cutter, and it's done
two ceramic floors and one bathroom wall. You certainly don't need
anything more substantial for the wall tiles. For the floor tiles,
it was fine for scoring them, but not strong enough to snap them.
For that, I gripped them in the jaws of the B&D Workmate, and thumped
them with a fist. Both schemes had very few failures. For more
intricate cutouts, I used an angle grider for the floor tiles, but
this was still quite difficult. I used a tile cutting jigsaw bit for
the wall tiles (with the jigsaw clamped upside down in the B&D workmate,
making a sort of table jigsaw;-).

Get plenty of spare tiles. Some places will happily do a sale or
return basis, but don't assume you will be able to go back later
and buy any more matching tiles. Both types I used seemed to cease
to exist within a month, but fortunately I have plenty left over.

--
Andrew Gabriel
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Lobster
 
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Get plenty of spare tiles. Some places will happily do a sale or
return basis, but don't assume you will be able to go back later
and buy any more matching tiles. Both types I used seemed to cease
to exist within a month, but fortunately I have plenty left over.


And in any case, you should always buy tiles with the same batch number
as the colour shade may vary a bit across batches. (And always check
every box you buy, as there's no guarantee that Andrew hasn't been in
yesterday returning a box from an old batch number, bought a few months
ago) :-)

David


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wrote:
I will be doing my first tiling next week.


You need a trowel (as you're _carrying_ adhesive on it, isn't this a
trowel rather than a float?). This should have notches appropriate to
the tile size - either wall or floor.

Then another trowel, which can be the nasty plastic freebie one - but
you need something tiny as well, just for that awkward corner under the
bath.

A "tile file" in both carbide file-shape and coated mesh (Plasplugs
cheapies)

Rubber squeegee for grouting.

A rubber tiler's sponge for grouting. This is _so_ much better to use
than an open-cell foam sponge.

Chalkline, levels, chinagraph pencil, OHP marking pen etc.

To cut tiles, get the _cheap_ Plasplugs electric wet tile saw. The
cheaper one seems to last longer than the expensive one. Either is
better than the all-metal Lucky Golden Hedgehog brand ones. If it's
more than a splashback with no cuts, then this really is worth having
as it's so much quicker and avoids waste tiles.

Then my favourite tool purchase this year, Screwfix's 50 quid laser
level (cross projector, not the whirling spot). This makes tiling _so_
much quicker and more fun. I love this gadget!

If it's a little job, buy some decent ready-mix tile adhesive. Don't
buy combined "fix and grout", don't buy cheap stuff (it's nasty to use
and doesn't have much "stiction"). But ASAP, start mixing your own
adhesive from dry powder - it's so much cheaper.

Couple of plastic buckets, including one old tile adhesive bucket (low
and wide) for mixing in.

Pack of foam pan scourers for general clean up. Adequate supply of
clean rags and vinyl gloves. Pair of tiling slippers (any cheap
market-stall espadrilles) - won't scratch the bath if you stand in it,
take them off before tracking plaster dust outside the bathroom.
Masking tape and dust sheets for dirt control before starting. Old
carpet for the bottom of the bath (put the plug in too). Vaseline for
the gold plate taps, to stop tile adhesive drips from sticking.

Nutrogena hand cream and barrier cream. Tile adhesive is hard on skin.


What else have I forgotten?

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John
 
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A rubber tiler's sponge for grouting. This is _so_ much better to use
than an open-cell foam sponge.


Where do you get these, I had one that was given to me by somebody but it is
now 'cattled' and I cannot seem to find a good one anywhere. My tile
shop(s) keep recommending "Hydro sponges", but they don't look the same.
Cheers

John

P.S. you forgot to mention a box of plasters for the dreaded 'Grout Finger'
from getting the grout right into the wall/ceiling intersection!


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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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In article ,
Andrew Gabriel andrew@a17 wrote:
Depends on the tiles. I bought a 10 tile cutter, and it's done
two ceramic floors and one bathroom wall. You certainly don't need
anything more substantial for the wall tiles. For the floor tiles,
it was fine for scoring them, but not strong enough to snap them.
For that, I gripped them in the jaws of the B&D Workmate, and thumped
them with a fist. Both schemes had very few failures. For more
intricate cutouts, I used an angle grider for the floor tiles, but
this was still quite difficult. I used a tile cutting jigsaw bit for
the wall tiles (with the jigsaw clamped upside down in the B&D workmate,
making a sort of table jigsaw;-).


I'd *seriously* recommend a newbie to tiling to buy a wet diamond circular
saw cutter. They are very cheap these days and need little skill to use.
And are far safer than an angle grinder. And if cutting expensive tiles
have a near nil failure rate - unlike score and snap types, especially
when cutting very small bits. Sure, they're slow, but for a newbie this is
no bad thing.

--
*The hardness of the butter is proportional to the softness of the bread *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Andy Dingley
 
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On Thu, 6 Oct 2005 16:39:06 +0000 (UTC), "John"
wrote:

A rubber tiler's sponge for grouting. This is _so_ much better to use
than an open-cell foam sponge.


Where do you get these,


Axminster, couple of quid
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.a...le=1&jump=4 0

Yes, that's a couple of quid for a mere sponge. it's worth it.


Whilst there I noticed this
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=22023
the cross laser is now on offer at 30 quid !

You need this! It's a fantastic gadget for tiling. Buy several!

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Grunff
 
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I'd *seriously* recommend a newbie to tiling to buy a wet diamond circular
saw cutter. They are very cheap these days and need little skill to use.
And are far safer than an angle grinder. And if cutting expensive tiles
have a near nil failure rate - unlike score and snap types, especially
when cutting very small bits. Sure, they're slow, but for a newbie this is
no bad thing.


I'll definitely second that - my 30 PlasPlugs cutter counts as just
about the best value tool I've ever bought. It's done a bathroom, shower
room, downstairs loo, kitchen, and several porcelain floors, and is
still going strong.


--
Grunff


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Thank you all for the very useful replies

Grunff is not that I'm lazy, more just looking for a good set. For
example my local DIY store as well a POUNDLAND have most of the tools
that I need. But I really looking for a fair price set that means I
don't need to worry about making the decision.

I found a website selling a set for something like =A3700 but it
included adhesive etc

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John Rumm
 
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John wrote:

P.S. you forgot to mention a box of plasters for the dreaded 'Grout Finger'
from getting the grout right into the wall/ceiling intersection!


Wicks do a rubber "finger" on a stick... Ideal for preserving the digit
when going for the nice concave grout finish!

--
Cheers,

John.

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