Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 11th 06, 06:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
E. Walter Le Roy
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt



  #2   Report Post  
Old March 11th 06, 06:53 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Grant Erwin
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

E. Walter Le Roy wrote:

I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks


Normally a face mill has multiple cutters, so if it e.g. has 8 cutters it can be
fed into the workpiece 8 times as fast as a single-point flycutter. The point is
time which is money ..

GWE
  #3   Report Post  
Old March 11th 06, 08:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
F. George McDuffee
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 17:27:24 GMT, "E. Walter Le Roy"
wrote:
I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt

==================
Keep in mind this is a reply to rec.crafts.metalworking and I am
assuming you are a home shop machinist with light duty machines
and a limited budget.

In this circumstance you are *MUCH* getter off with a fly cutter.
A flycutter uses a lathe bit that you can resharpen and custom
grind with your desired clearance and rake angles and you can use
either HSS or carbide.

A face mill is much more expensive and will require a special
arbor. While it may machine slightly faster, generally the
lighter home shop machines won't have either the power or
regidity to remove much more [if any metal] than a fly cutter per
unit time. If the facemill is HSS/brazed insert you will have to
send it out for sharpening [unless you have a survace grinder and
fixturing] and if it is replaceable insert, the inserts are very
expensive for hobby use.

The import fly cutters typically sell for 10-20$ a set and the
HSS [M2] lathe tool blanks are generally on sale for 1$ or less
each. [FWIW -- I find tungsten tooling is of little value in the
home shop and is much harder to grind.] You can use carbide lathe
tools, again 1-2$ each import c.3-5$ domestic -- use the C2 as it
is more shock resistant.

It is easy to make your own two tool rough/finish fly cutter.
The single tool cutters are so cheap it is not worthwhile from a
cost;benefit viewpoint.

Unka George



The art of leadership . . . consists in consolidating the attention of the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will split up that attention. . . . The leader of genius must have the ability to make different opponents appear as if they belonged to one category.
Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), German dictator. Mein Kampf, vol. 1, ch. 3 (1925).
  #4   Report Post  
Old March 11th 06, 09:05 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Richard W.
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter


"E. Walter Le Roy" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt


As it was said you can feed faster with the face mill. I just got a used
mill/drill. and I can take some pretty healthy cuts with a 1 1/2" inserted
cutter which uses 3 of the TPG322 inserts. I can justify a face mill because
the cost of each corner on an insert is less than having a cutter sent out
for sharpening. Last time I bought inserts I paid about $3.00 each for them.
If I use one corner on 3 inserts every time I index the insert costs me
$3.00. Also when I can afford to upgrade my mill to either a Bridgeport type
or a number 2 horizontal mill with a vertical attachment my 1 1/2" face mill
will work just fine there.

If I want a real nice finish and my machine isn't very ridged then a light
cut with a fly cutter is the way to go.


  #5   Report Post  
Old March 12th 06, 03:52 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
David Anderson
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

Amen to the single fly-cutter with a 5/16 inch HSS lathe bit. With a
slow steady feed you can get a near-mirror finished surface, and regrinding
is a snap.

"F. George McDuffee" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 17:27:24 GMT, "E. Walter Le Roy"
wrote:
I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt

==================
Keep in mind this is a reply to rec.crafts.metalworking and I am
assuming you are a home shop machinist with light duty machines
and a limited budget.

In this circumstance you are *MUCH* getter off with a fly cutter.
A flycutter uses a lathe bit that you can resharpen and custom
grind with your desired clearance and rake angles and you can use
either HSS or carbide.

A face mill is much more expensive and will require a special
arbor. While it may machine slightly faster, generally the
lighter home shop machines won't have either the power or
regidity to remove much more [if any metal] than a fly cutter per
unit time. If the facemill is HSS/brazed insert you will have to
send it out for sharpening [unless you have a survace grinder and
fixturing] and if it is replaceable insert, the inserts are very
expensive for hobby use.

The import fly cutters typically sell for 10-20$ a set and the
HSS [M2] lathe tool blanks are generally on sale for 1$ or less
each. [FWIW -- I find tungsten tooling is of little value in the
home shop and is much harder to grind.] You can use carbide lathe
tools, again 1-2$ each import c.3-5$ domestic -- use the C2 as it
is more shock resistant.

It is easy to make your own two tool rough/finish fly cutter.
The single tool cutters are so cheap it is not worthwhile from a
cost;benefit viewpoint.

Unka George



The art of leadership . . . consists in consolidating the attention of

the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will
split up that attention. . . . The leader of genius must have the ability to
make different opponents appear as if they belonged to one category.
Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), German dictator. Mein Kampf, vol. 1, ch. 3

(1925).




  #6   Report Post  
Old March 12th 06, 04:34 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
E. Walter Le Roy
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

Thanks to all w ho replied. You completely cleared up my questions.
Walt
"David Anderson" wrote in message
. com...
Amen to the single fly-cutter with a 5/16 inch HSS lathe bit. With a
slow steady feed you can get a near-mirror finished surface, and
regrinding is a snap.

"F. George McDuffee" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 17:27:24 GMT, "E. Walter Le Roy"
wrote:
I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt

==================
Keep in mind this is a reply to rec.crafts.metalworking and I am
assuming you are a home shop machinist with light duty machines
and a limited budget.

In this circumstance you are *MUCH* getter off with a fly cutter.
A flycutter uses a lathe bit that you can resharpen and custom
grind with your desired clearance and rake angles and you can use
either HSS or carbide.

A face mill is much more expensive and will require a special
arbor. While it may machine slightly faster, generally the
lighter home shop machines won't have either the power or
regidity to remove much more [if any metal] than a fly cutter per
unit time. If the facemill is HSS/brazed insert you will have to
send it out for sharpening [unless you have a survace grinder and
fixturing] and if it is replaceable insert, the inserts are very
expensive for hobby use.

The import fly cutters typically sell for 10-20$ a set and the
HSS [M2] lathe tool blanks are generally on sale for 1$ or less
each. [FWIW -- I find tungsten tooling is of little value in the
home shop and is much harder to grind.] You can use carbide lathe
tools, again 1-2$ each import c.3-5$ domestic -- use the C2 as it
is more shock resistant.

It is easy to make your own two tool rough/finish fly cutter.
The single tool cutters are so cheap it is not worthwhile from a
cost;benefit viewpoint.

Unka George



The art of leadership . . . consists in consolidating the attention of

the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will
split up that attention. . . . The leader of genius must have the ability
to make different opponents appear as if they belonged to one category.
Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), German dictator. Mein Kampf, vol. 1, ch. 3

(1925).



  #7   Report Post  
Old March 12th 06, 05:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
spaco
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

My mill won't go any slower than 350 rpm, so I figure that I couldn't
use a very large diameter fly cutter, so I use a 1 1/2" face mill with 3
TPG 322 inserts and it works just fine. Sometimes I look longingly at
those who have flycutters with a 4" diameter swing, but I cant' go as
slow as that 12 + inches per rev would require.

Pete Stanaitis

E. Walter Le Roy wrote:

I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt


  #8   Report Post  
Old March 13th 06, 01:38 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
John
 
Posts: n/a
Default face mill vs fly cutter

"F. George McDuffee" wrote:

On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 17:27:24 GMT, "E. Walter Le Roy"
wrote:
I'm sure it's been discussed here before but I missed it. What is the
advantage of using a face mill rather than a fly cutter?
Thanks
Walt

==================
Keep in mind this is a reply to rec.crafts.metalworking and I am
assuming you are a home shop machinist with light duty machines
and a limited budget.

In this circumstance you are *MUCH* getter off with a fly cutter.
A flycutter uses a lathe bit that you can resharpen and custom
grind with your desired clearance and rake angles and you can use
either HSS or carbide.

A face mill is much more expensive and will require a special
arbor. While it may machine slightly faster, generally the
lighter home shop machines won't have either the power or
regidity to remove much more [if any metal] than a fly cutter per
unit time. If the facemill is HSS/brazed insert you will have to
send it out for sharpening [unless you have a survace grinder and
fixturing] and if it is replaceable insert, the inserts are very
expensive for hobby use.

The import fly cutters typically sell for 10-20$ a set and the
HSS [M2] lathe tool blanks are generally on sale for 1$ or less
each. [FWIW -- I find tungsten tooling is of little value in the
home shop and is much harder to grind.] You can use carbide lathe
tools, again 1-2$ each import c.3-5$ domestic -- use the C2 as it
is more shock resistant.

It is easy to make your own two tool rough/finish fly cutter.
The single tool cutters are so cheap it is not worthwhile from a
cost;benefit viewpoint.

Unka George



The art of leadership . . . consists in consolidating the attention of the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will split up that attention. . . . The leader of genius must have the ability to make different opponents appear as if they belonged to one category.
Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), German dictator. Mein Kampf, vol. 1, ch. 3 (1925).


If you want to use carbide in your home shop, go to a commercial shop
and ask them for some of their old carbide inserts. You can resharpen
them and braze them on a tool blank for practically no cost.

John


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Face frame attachment with biscuits Chuck Miller Woodworking 15 January 10th 06 12:01 AM
Thread Boxes Trevor Woodworking 4 July 20th 05 07:13 AM
Ode to Sieg's mini mill and buncha observations/tips rashid111 Metalworking 1 July 5th 05 06:01 PM
Gear cutting...am I crazy? (long) Glenn Lyford Metalworking 27 December 27th 03 07:39 AM
FA: 4" Sandvik Face Mill and Large Lyndex Tapper Keith Marshall Metalworking 0 November 3rd 03 06:59 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:11 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017