Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Proctologically Violated©®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Spring-loaded live centers was Straight shank live centers

The spring loaded live center is a great idea.

Why not put a spring behind the shank, in a holder, and leave the set screw
loose?
Most of the shank/holder combo's I encounter have a good fit, and a stiff
spring in the holder would likely give you the tension you desire. This
should work in cnc/pneumatic tailstocks as well.

Here's a little trick I use to get the benefits of spring loading without
the $$, in manual machines, which may give you some ideas.

Lathe tailstock:
The hand wheel is usually pretty free-wheeling, so what I do is bump the
work w/ the tailstock/center, turn the handle to the 2 o'clock position
(facing the chuck from the bed end), lock the tailstock down, and load the
handle w/ cored brass/bronze weights. This puts a constant tension on the
live center, and the weights usually stay in the 2 to 4-o'clock positions,
for good torque.
You could also rig a spring from the handle, hooked under the bed someplace.
Works really, really nice.

Milling/table tailstocik:
These have tougher, smaller wheels, not ideally suited for what I just
described.
But, by clamping a suff'ly long lever arm to said wheel, you might be able
to achieve the same effect.
Altho I think here, a simple stiff spring in the holder behind the shank
would be more convenient.

I haven't used the spring-behind-shank method, cuz I don't currently have a
straight-shank live center. But this sounds like a good reason to get one!
--
Mr. P.V.'d
formerly Droll Troll
"Protagonist" wrote in message
. ..
Any one can point me to, where can I buy economical straight shank (1/2")
live centers, if it's spring loaded even better.
The one I found in the MSC or Shoptools catalog are expensive $250-$300.

Julius



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Cliff
 
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Default Spring-loaded live centers was Straight shank live centers

On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 20:39:36 -0500, "Proctologically Violated©®"
wrote:

smaller wheels


Is this about jb again? Or was that "joysticks"?
--
Cliff
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BottleBob
 
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Default Spring-loaded live centers was Straight shank live centers

"Proctologically Violated©®" wrote:

The spring loaded live center is a great idea.


PV:

Here are some examples:

================================================== ==================
http://www.cartertools.com/catalog.html

#1151 $15.20
================================================== ==================

The one above looks like it could be a 1/2" straight shank like what
"Protagonist" was looking for. Economical too.

================================================== ==================
http://www.ferret.com.au/articles/53/0c00b353.asp

The new live centre allows long jobs held between centres, or a chuck
and centre, to expand during turning operations without damage.
================================================== ==================

================================================== ==================
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ub...;f=10;t=000039

Spring loaded design compensates for center variations, without damage
to work piece or center tip. This assures operator of uniform constant
tension.
================================================== ==================


Why not put a spring behind the shank, in a holder, and leave the set screw
loose?


Lathe tailstock:
The hand wheel is usually pretty free-wheeling, so what I do is bump the
work w/ the tailstock/center, turn the handle to the 2 o'clock position
(facing the chuck from the bed end), lock the tailstock down, and load the
handle w/ cored brass/bronze weights.


You could also rig a spring from the handle, hooked under the bed someplace.
Works really, really nice.


Creativity when the needed tooling is not available, or too expensive,
is IMO an excellent trait for a machinist to have.


--
BottleBob
http://home.earthlink.net/~bottlbob
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Posted to alt.machines.cnc,rec.crafts.metalworking
machineman
 
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Default Spring-loaded live centers was Straight shank live centers

I bought a couple of special from these guys, excellent product and had
my specials done in less than a month from the time they got my drawing.
http://www.motortoolmanufacturing.co...dcenters.shtml

Proctologically Violated©® wrote:
The spring loaded live center is a great idea.

Why not put a spring behind the shank, in a holder, and leave the set screw
loose?
Most of the shank/holder combo's I encounter have a good fit, and a stiff
spring in the holder would likely give you the tension you desire. This
should work in cnc/pneumatic tailstocks as well.

Here's a little trick I use to get the benefits of spring loading without
the $$, in manual machines, which may give you some ideas.

Lathe tailstock:
The hand wheel is usually pretty free-wheeling, so what I do is bump the
work w/ the tailstock/center, turn the handle to the 2 o'clock position
(facing the chuck from the bed end), lock the tailstock down, and load the
handle w/ cored brass/bronze weights. This puts a constant tension on the
live center, and the weights usually stay in the 2 to 4-o'clock positions,
for good torque.
You could also rig a spring from the handle, hooked under the bed someplace.
Works really, really nice.

Milling/table tailstocik:
These have tougher, smaller wheels, not ideally suited for what I just
described.
But, by clamping a suff'ly long lever arm to said wheel, you might be able
to achieve the same effect.
Altho I think here, a simple stiff spring in the holder behind the shank
would be more convenient.

I haven't used the spring-behind-shank method, cuz I don't currently have a
straight-shank live center. But this sounds like a good reason to get one!
--
Mr. P.V.'d
formerly Droll Troll
"Protagonist" wrote in message
. ..

Any one can point me to, where can I buy economical straight shank (1/2")
live centers, if it's spring loaded even better.
The one I found in the MSC or Shoptools catalog are expensive $250-$300.

Julius




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