Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old December 2nd 11, 07:30 PM posted to alt.home.repair
bob bob is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 65
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

I opened up a defective hotplate and found a bunch of cotton-like insulation
material inside. I put them into a plastic bag but a lot of short fibers
(less than 1cm long) fall out of the "cotton" which I vacuumed up.

Here's a photo of it:
http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/20384895_GsHfRJ

I'm guessing it's fiberglass or asbestos. How can I tell? And is any of
these two material harmful to be around? If I fix the hotplate, should I put
this "cotton" back, or should I use something else?

The heating wires is inside a sheet of mylar-like material and the "cotton"
insulation is used to press the sheet tight against the top of the hotplate.


  #2   Report Post  
Old December 2nd 11, 07:51 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,107
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

On Dec 2, 1:30*pm, "bob" wrote:
I opened up a defective hotplate and found a bunch of cotton-like insulation
material inside. I put them into a plastic bag but a lot of short fibers
(less than 1cm long) fall out of the "cotton" which I vacuumed up.

Here's a photo of it:http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/20384895_GsHfRJ

I'm guessing it's fiberglass or asbestos. How can I tell? And is any of
these two material harmful to be around? If I fix the hotplate, should I put
this "cotton" back, or should I use something else?

The heating wires is inside a sheet of mylar-like material and the "cotton"
insulation is used to press the sheet tight against the top of the hotplate.


The vintage/age of the hotplate in question is important in
determining
what type of insulation you are dealing with...

Small fibers of either material are harmful to inhale... It is the
small
fiber particles that embed themselves into the tiny passageways in
the lungs that causes severe health problems with prolonged exposure
over time...

~~ Evan
  #3   Report Post  
Old December 2nd 11, 08:29 PM posted to alt.home.repair
bob bob is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 65
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

The vintage/age of the hotplate in question is important in
determining
what type of insulation you are dealing with...


Bought it about 3 years old.

BTW, I found the defect. Apparently one of those loose fiber got between the
(mechanical) thermostat contacts. The solution is simple: I pull a piece of
paper between the contacts and now it conducts.

I'm inclined to not put the fibrous insulation back in this thing to avoid
more loose fibers. However, I need a 1-inch thick, heat resistant and
slightly elastic material to push the heating sheet tight against the top
surface.

I think several folded oven mittens may work but is there a better
alternative?

  #4   Report Post  
Old December 2nd 11, 08:53 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,238
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

On Dec 2, 1:29*pm, "bob" wrote:
The vintage/age of the hotplate in question is important in
determining
what type of insulation you are dealing with...


Bought it about 3 years old.

BTW, I found the defect. Apparently one of those loose fiber got between the
(mechanical) thermostat contacts. The solution is simple: I pull a piece of
paper between the contacts and now it conducts.

I'm inclined to not put the fibrous insulation back in this thing to avoid
more loose fibers. *However, I need a 1-inch thick, heat resistant and
slightly elastic material to push the heating sheet tight against the top
surface.

I think several folded oven mittens may work but is there a better
alternative?


That sure looks like fibreglass to me, why not replace it with some
new fibreglass?
  #5   Report Post  
Old December 2nd 11, 11:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2007
Posts: 6,404
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

On Dec 2, 2:53*pm, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Dec 2, 1:29*pm, "bob" wrote:





The vintage/age of the hotplate in question is important in
determining
what type of insulation you are dealing with...


Bought it about 3 years old.


BTW, I found the defect. Apparently one of those loose fiber got between the
(mechanical) thermostat contacts. The solution is simple: I pull a piece of
paper between the contacts and now it conducts.


I'm inclined to not put the fibrous insulation back in this thing to avoid
more loose fibers. *However, I need a 1-inch thick, heat resistant and
slightly elastic material to push the heating sheet tight against the top
surface.


I think several folded oven mittens may work but is there a better
alternative?


That sure looks like fibreglass to me, why not replace it with some
new fibreglass?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


If it's 3 years old it's not asbestos. Nor does that look like
asbestos. My guess would be fiberglass too, or some kind
of rock wool.


  #6   Report Post  
Old December 3rd 11, 01:53 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,234
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

On 12/2/11 1:30 PM, bob wrote:
I opened up a defective hotplate and found a bunch of cotton-like
insulation material inside. I put them into a plastic bag but a lot of
short fibers (less than 1cm long) fall out of the "cotton" which I
vacuumed up.

Here's a photo of it:
http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/20384895_GsHfRJ

I'm guessing it's fiberglass or asbestos. How can I tell? And is any of
these two material harmful to be around? If I fix the hotplate, should I
put this "cotton" back, or should I use something else?

The heating wires is inside a sheet of mylar-like material and the
"cotton" insulation is used to press the sheet tight against the top of
the hotplate.


Here's what asbestos looks like.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/asbestos_pix/3563807102/
  #7   Report Post  
Old December 3rd 11, 04:18 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 10,794
Default Fiberglass or asbestos?

On Fri, 2 Dec 2011 10:30:04 -0800, "bob" wrote:

I opened up a defective hotplate and found a bunch of cotton-like insulation
material inside. I put them into a plastic bag but a lot of short fibers
(less than 1cm long) fall out of the "cotton" which I vacuumed up.

Here's a photo of it:
http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/20384895_GsHfRJ

I'm guessing it's fiberglass or asbestos. How can I tell? And is any of
these two material harmful to be around? If I fix the hotplate, should I put
this "cotton" back, or should I use something else?

The heating wires is inside a sheet of mylar-like material and the "cotton"
insulation is used to press the sheet tight against the top of the hotplate.



It is NOT asbestos. It is a form of fiberglass or mineral wool and
can take high temperatures. It also serves a purpose so it should be
put back. The wrong material or no material can cause overheating and
damage.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DryLok over Asbestos Tile? (or how to waterproof over asbestos tile) Dan Home Repair 4 May 21st 17 03:01 AM
polystyrene vs fiberglass cece e. Home Repair 6 July 14th 06 03:32 PM
PAINT A FIBERGLASS TUB? April Inyard Home Repair 5 April 21st 06 03:42 PM
Tuff-R instead of fiberglass...... [email protected] Home Repair 11 April 16th 06 01:56 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:33 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017