Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Mike
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cleaning VCR - need help and a diagram

I'm going to clean my VCR and I need some help. I've done a Google
search for information on this but I'm still a bit confused. Some
people say to use a clean cloth or a Q-tip while other people say to
use only chamois swabs. Is using a cloth bad because I can't seem to
find any chamois swabs.

The second problem is that I'm obviously not an expert in VCR cleaning
and I'm not quite sure where the video head(s) are located. Is there a
picture or diagram someone could email me.

What type of cleaning solution is best to use? I've heard of all sorts
of things to use but some people say not to use them so I'm confused.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  #5   Report Post  
Mike
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Asimov" wrote in message . ..
"Mike" bravely wrote to "All" (13 Sep 04 22:46:40)
--- on the heady topic of "Cleaning VCR - need help and a diagram"

Mi From: (Mike)

Mi I'm going to clean my VCR and I need some help.
[,,,]
Mi Any help would be greatly appreciated.


All together now: READ THE F.A.Q.!!!

You're welcome,
A*s*i*m*o*v





I did read the FAQ before I posted but I still had questions. But I
think I'll ask my questions somplace else since people in this
newsgroup are going to be rude.


  #8   Report Post  
Asimov
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Mike" bravely wrote to "All" (14 Sep 04 23:38:27)
--- on the heady topic of " Cleaning VCR - need help and a diagram"

Mi From: (Mike)

Mi "Asimov" wrote in
Mi message . ..
Mi From:
(Mike)
Mi I'm going to clean my VCR and I need some help.
[,,,]
Mi Any help would be greatly appreciated.


All together now: READ THE F.A.Q.!!!

You're welcome,



Mi I did read the FAQ before I posted but I still had questions. But I
Mi think I'll ask my questions somplace else since people in this
Mi newsgroup are going to be rude.


You call THAT rude?!!! Perhaps, littleboyblu87, you first need a
little toughening up for usenet? You have no idea what a thorough
usenet flaming is like.

;-) ;-) ;-)

HOWEVER,

Just to prove you wrong I'm going to dump some archival info
starting with the VCR cleaning FAQ you claim to have read.
Really, you're welcome,

A*s*i*m*o*v



Date: 04 Aug 95 13:23:29

General Guide to VCR Cleaning and Rubber Parts Replacement:
----------------------------------------------------------

All the guideposts, wheels, and rubber parts of a VCR should be cleaned
periodically - how often depends on usage. Of course, no one really does it
unless something goes wrong.

Do not attempt to clean the video heads until you read the procedure
below, you can break them - very expensive lesson. In most cases, they
do not need attention anyhow.

Qtips and alcohol (91% medicinal is ok, pure isopropyl is better. Avoid
rubbing alcohol especially if it contains any additives) can be used
everywhere except the video heads. Just dry quickly to avoid leaving
residue behind.

Cleaning may get your machine going well enough to get by until any replacement
rubber parts arrive.

Things to clean:

1. Capstan and pinch roller. These collect a lot of crud mostly oxide which
flakes off of (old rental) tapes. Use as many Q-tips (wet but not dripping
with alcohol) as necessary to remove all foreign matter from the capstan
(the shiny shaft that pulls the tape through the VCR for play and record).
Just don't get impatient and use something sharp - the crud will come off
with the Qtips and maybe some help from a fingernail.

Clean the pinch roller (presses against the capstan in Play and Record)
and until no more black stuff comes off. Use as many Qtips as necessary.

If the pinch roller is still hard and/or shiny, it will probably need
replacement. Many are available for about $6 from the sources listed
below. It is sometimes possible to put the pinch roller in an electric
drill, drill press, or lathe, and carefully file off the hard shiny dried
out rubber surface layer, but only use a last resort - and this fix is
probably temporary at best.

2. Various guideposts including the roller guides (the white rollers on metal
posts which are near the video head drum when in play or record mode).
When in FF or REW, or with no tape present, these move on tracks to
a position toward the front of the VCR.

3. Idler tire (idler swings between reels and transfers motor power to
reels - clean until no more black stuff comes off. A dirty or worn idler
tire is probably the single most common VCR problem.

If the idler tire appears cracked, glazed, or dried out, it will need to be
replaced. About $.50-$1.00. As a temporary measure, you can usually
turn the tire inside-out and replace it. The protected inner (now outer)
surface will grip well enough to restore functionality until a replacement
tire arrives - and verify the diagnosis as to the cause of your problem.

Also, the idler assembly includes a slip clutch. If this weakens, the
idler may not have enough force to press on the reel table edges. When in
doubt, the entire idler assembly is often available as a replacement part.

4. Reel table edges - surface on the reel tables where the idler contacts.

5. Audio/control head (right side) and full erase head (if you have one, left
side). Q-tips and alcohol are ok for these.

6. Anything else that the tape contacts on its exciting journey through your
machine.

7. Rubber belts. Access to some of these will probably require the removal
of the bottom cover. After noting where each belt goes, remove them
individually (if possible) and clean with alcohol and Qtips or lint free
cloth. Dry quickly to avoid degrading the rubber from contact with the
alcohol. If a belt is trapped by some assembly and not easy to remove,
use the Qtip on the belt and/or pulley in place. However, if it is
stretched, flabby, or damaged, you will need to figure out how to free it.

Any belts that appear loose, flabby or do not return instantly to
their relaxed size when stretched by 25% or so will need to be replaced
and may be the cause of your problems. Belts cost about $.30-$2.00
and complete replacement belt kits are often available by model for $3.-$12.
Meanwhile, the belts will function better once they are cleaned, maybe
just enough to get by until your replacements arrive.

8. Video heads: READ CAREFULLY.

While VCRs should be cleaned periodically, the video heads themselves
usually do not need cleaning unless you have been playing old or defective
rental tapes which may leave oxide deposits on the tips of the delicate
ferrite head chips. Unless you are experiencing video snow, intermittent
color, or loss of or intermittent HiFi sound (HiFi VCRs only, the HiFi
heads are located on the video head drum) leave the video heads alone.

I have used wet type cleaning head cleaning tapes with some success.
Follow the directions but wait sufficient time for everything to dry out
or you will have a tangled mess - 15 minutes or so should do it..

To clean by hand, you will need what are called 'head cleaning sticks'.
These are covered by chamois and are safest. DO NOT USE QTIPS (COTTON
SWABS). These can catch on the ferrite cores and damage them or leave
fibers stuck in the heads. Qtips can be used for cleaning the other
parts like the rollers and audio/control head as described above but
not video heads.

To use the cleaning stick, moisten it with head cleaner or alcohol.
Pure isopropyl is best, however, the 91% medicinal stuff is ok as long
as you dry everything pretty quickly. Don't flood it as it will take
a long time to dry and you run the risk of any water in the alcohol
sitting on surfaces and resulting in rust (very unlikely, but don't
take the chance).

Gently hold the flat portion of the chamois against the upper cylinder
where it is joined to the lower (non-rotating) cylinder. Rotate the upper
cylinder be hand so that the heads brush up against the moist
chamois. DO NOT MOVE THE HEAD CLEANING STICK UP AND DOWN - you
will break the fragile ferrite of the heads - $$$$. Side
to side is ok as long as you are gentle.

Depending on how dirty your heads are, a couple of passes may
be enough. Let everything dry out for at least 1/2 hour. This
process can be repeated. However, one pass will usually do it.

The following are good sources for consumer electronics replacement parts,
especially for VCRs, TVs, and other audio and video equipment:

MCM Electronics (VCR parts, Japanese semiconductors,
1-800-543-4330. tools, test equipment, audio, consumer
electronics including microwave oven parts
and electric range elements, etc.)

Dalbani (Excellent Japanese semiconductor source,
1-800-325-2264. VCR parts, other consumer electronics,)

Premium Parts (Very complete VCR parts, some tools, adapter
1-800-558-9572. cables, other replacement parts.)

-eof-



Area: Doing your own repairs in electronics
Date: 15 Sep 01 10:59:42
From: "voltare"
Subj: VCR Head Clean [html]

How To Clean Your VCR Heads

A How-To on cleaning your VCR tape heads, head drum, and other parts inside
your VCR.

WARNING: Read this entire page and refer to additional references at the
bottom of the page before attempting this procedure.

Difficulty Level: Hard Time Required: 30 Minutes


Here's How:

a. Eject any Tape from VCR and Uplug it from wall current
b. Unplug any other cables from VCR (Cable, Antenna, Audio/Video Cables,
etc..).
c. Place VCR on flat surface such as a table covered with newspaper or
cloth to protect table surface.
d. With the appropriate screwdriver, remove VCR cover carefully.
e. You will see a shiny round drum--this is the Head Drum. Take an
isopropyl alcohol-dipped chamois tipped cleaning stick and place it on the
Head Drum with light pressure.
f. Manually rotate the Head drum with your free hand (it spins freely),
keeping the chamois stick stationary, allowing fluid to clean the drum
(never move the chamois stick in the vertical direction--you may snap off
the Head protrusions on the drum).
g. With fresh chamois tips and alcohol, now clean the Stationary audio
head, Capstans, Rollers, and Gears. Check for dust. Do not get excessive
fluid on any parts.
h. Clean Belts and Pulleys using fresh chamoise tips, once again, do not
use excessive fluid.
i. Clean dust off Circuit Boards using a mini-vacuum cleaner and/or
compressed air (use just enough force to remove the dust and dirt).
j. Let machine site a few minutes after finishing above process.
k. With the VCR still open, plug into wall and TV, turn on VCR and insert
a recorded tape. (do not touch any of the interior workings of the VCR or
interior metal cabinet during this process).
l. Press Play on VCR and confirm that everything is functioning correctly
and picture and sound is restored.
m. Repeat steps 1-10 if results are not satisfactory.
n. Eject Tape, Unplug VCR from wall, uplug all cables.
o. Screw VCR cover back on and place back in original location with
proper hookups.


Tips:

a. Do not perform the above procedure if your VCR is still covered by
Warranty or Extended Service Plan. Take unit to authorized technician
instead.
b. Make sure you have all the proper srewdriver(s), Chamois, cleaning
solution, etc... before starting Step One of this process. DO NOT USE
Q-TIPS.
c. Your Guide is not responsible for any damage to your VCR involving any
steps in this process. If you have doubts about your skill after opening the
cabinet, do not go forward. For more extensive information, check the
resources below.


Related Features:

a. Online Service Manual.
b. Tips For Extending The Life Of Your VCR
c. How A VCR Works (includes interior photos of VCR mechanisms)
d. VCR Repair: General VCR Cleaning Guide
e. VCR First Aid.

-!-



Area: sci.electronics.repair
Date: 30 Apr 95 15:28:05
From: (Tim Rudeseal)
Subj: Cleaning VCR Heads

Organization: Southern College of Technology
In article ,
(Gareth Blades) wrote:
lestat@seamonkey (lestat) wrote:

stuff deleted


I usually use a piece of plain paper, like a post-it note, and a
little IPA. I put it directly on each head and rotate back and forth
several times, repeat with another piece. I know when it is clean
when there is no longer any dirt on the paper.

-!-



Area: Doing your own repairs in electronics
Date: 13 Aug 98 16:18:24
From:
Subj: what do you use to clean VCRs ?

I'm going to catch some flak for this, but for the head chips, I use a
pencil eraser, and for the upper and lower drums, I use a Q-tip and a
solvent called Chloro-clean (a GC product). No, I don't inhale. ;-)

The pencil eraser "trick" came from a Sony Rep in the Beta days of the
late '70s. It will scour even the toughest clog and provides just
enough "give" to keep it from damaging the head chip (which I've never
done).

If the head or tape path is contaminated by sugar (soda pop), rubbing
alcohol does the initial cleanup for the tape path, then a follow up
with solvent.

Ray Carlsen
CARLSEN ELECTRONICS... a leader in trailing-edge technology.

-!-



From: Jeff Grous
To: Achim Lohse
Date: 94-05-23 23:08:00
Subj: VCR cleaning procedure

AL Now, how about a short discourse on procedure for doing the cleaning
AL properly, and what materials to use, and which to avoid especially.
AL My knowledge is limited to Q-tips and isopropyl alcohol. However, I
AL _am_ vaguely aware that the alcohol tends to dry out the rubber
AL parts, promoting cracks, and the Q-tips shed fibres, possibly
AL gumming the works. I believe the swabs also come in cotton or rayo
AL form, but have no idea whether one is preferable.

Well, here's how I do it- I use medical-grade wood swabs with dual
cotton tips for all moving parts _except_ the drum itself. The cotton
stays on the swabs, and they're tough enough so that you can REALLY get
down and scrub those stubborn stains. bg As a solvent, I will
generally use denatured alcohol, since pure ethanol is not easily
obtainable. This won't hurt the rubber parts like isopropyl will.
In really tough places I will use acetone or what we call "Grean Death,"
A.K.A. GC Radio/TV service solvent. (This stuff is basically pure
Tolulene, and is NASTY. It used to be green, and hence the name. Now
it's clear, but the lable is still green. It works GREAT on rubber
parts and stubborn spots, but will DESTROY plastic much better than
acetone. It destroys _you_ much more effectively, too. grin) Clean
EVERYTHING the tape touches until: A) the swab picks up no more crud,
or, B) you can see that the surface you're cleaning is in fact clean.
If you cannot make the pinch roller look pristine with a matte finish,
it's toast. Replace it. You can also use the swab on the lower
(non-rotating part) drum. Be sure to especially scrub the spot on the
lower drum where the tape enters and exits, this is the area that gets
dirtiest. Also, be sure that you rotate the upper drum so that the head
chips are nowhere near that swab while you clean, or you run the risk of
snagging a chip and breaking it off. Now for the last part...

I use a very tightly knitted special cotton cloth called a Texwipe for
cleaning the upper drum. You CANNOT use an ordinary cloth. You fold
the cloth into quarters, soak it in solvent and press it against the
drun with your index finger. Rotating the drum with your other hand and
keeping the cloth still will get both the chips and the surface of the
drum. Be forewarned: THIS IS NOT FOR THE FAINTHEARTED OR PEOPLE WITH
10 THUMBS. There's a "feel" to this task, and if you get it completely
wrong, you'll break a chip. It's pretty forgiving, but if you're
uncomfortable, use a clean white business card folded in half soaked in
solvent instead of the Texwipe. You won't get the head as clean, but
you won't break a chip off, either.

I don't like those foam swabs or the chamois sticks, they grab head
chips too easily. If you can't get any Texwipes, drop me a note and
I'll send ya a couple.

Short? Well, guess not... good luck!

-Jeff

-!-



.... "Bother!" said Pooh, as he saw the sparks and smelled the smoke.

  #9   Report Post  
Asimov
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Mike" bravely wrote to "All" (14 Sep 04 23:38:27)
--- on the heady topic of " Cleaning VCR - need help and a diagram"

Mi From: (Mike)

Mi "Asimov" wrote in
Mi message . ..
Mi From:
(Mike)
Mi I'm going to clean my VCR and I need some help.
[,,,]
Mi Any help would be greatly appreciated.


All together now: READ THE F.A.Q.!!!

You're welcome,



Mi I did read the FAQ before I posted but I still had questions. But I
Mi think I'll ask my questions somplace else since people in this
Mi newsgroup are going to be rude.


You call THAT rude?!!! Perhaps, littleboyblu87, you first need a
little toughening up for usenet? You have no idea what a thorough
usenet flaming is like.

;-) ;-) ;-)

HOWEVER,

Just to prove you wrong I'm going to dump some archival info
starting with the VCR cleaning FAQ you claim to have read.
Really, you're welcome,

A*s*i*m*o*v



Date: 04 Aug 95 13:23:29

General Guide to VCR Cleaning and Rubber Parts Replacement:
----------------------------------------------------------

All the guideposts, wheels, and rubber parts of a VCR should be cleaned
periodically - how often depends on usage. Of course, no one really does it
unless something goes wrong.

Do not attempt to clean the video heads until you read the procedure
below, you can break them - very expensive lesson. In most cases, they
do not need attention anyhow.

Qtips and alcohol (91% medicinal is ok, pure isopropyl is better. Avoid
rubbing alcohol especially if it contains any additives) can be used
everywhere except the video heads. Just dry quickly to avoid leaving
residue behind.

Cleaning may get your machine going well enough to get by until any replacement
rubber parts arrive.

Things to clean:

1. Capstan and pinch roller. These collect a lot of crud mostly oxide which
flakes off of (old rental) tapes. Use as many Q-tips (wet but not dripping
with alcohol) as necessary to remove all foreign matter from the capstan
(the shiny shaft that pulls the tape through the VCR for play and record).
Just don't get impatient and use something sharp - the crud will come off
with the Qtips and maybe some help from a fingernail.

Clean the pinch roller (presses against the capstan in Play and Record)
and until no more black stuff comes off. Use as many Qtips as necessary.

If the pinch roller is still hard and/or shiny, it will probably need
replacement. Many are available for about $6 from the sources listed
below. It is sometimes possible to put the pinch roller in an electric
drill, drill press, or lathe, and carefully file off the hard shiny dried
out rubber surface layer, but only use a last resort - and this fix is
probably temporary at best.

2. Various guideposts including the roller guides (the white rollers on metal
posts which are near the video head drum when in play or record mode).
When in FF or REW, or with no tape present, these move on tracks to
a position toward the front of the VCR.

3. Idler tire (idler swings between reels and transfers motor power to
reels - clean until no more black stuff comes off. A dirty or worn idler
tire is probably the single most common VCR problem.

If the idler tire appears cracked, glazed, or dried out, it will need to be
replaced. About $.50-$1.00. As a temporary measure, you can usually
turn the tire inside-out and replace it. The protected inner (now outer)
surface will grip well enough to restore functionality until a replacement
tire arrives - and verify the diagnosis as to the cause of your problem.

Also, the idler assembly includes a slip clutch. If this weakens, the
idler may not have enough force to press on the reel table edges. When in
doubt, the entire idler assembly is often available as a replacement part.

4. Reel table edges - surface on the reel tables where the idler contacts.

5. Audio/control head (right side) and full erase head (if you have one, left
side). Q-tips and alcohol are ok for these.

6. Anything else that the tape contacts on its exciting journey through your
machine.

7. Rubber belts. Access to some of these will probably require the removal
of the bottom cover. After noting where each belt goes, remove them
individually (if possible) and clean with alcohol and Qtips or lint free
cloth. Dry quickly to avoid degrading the rubber from contact with the
alcohol. If a belt is trapped by some assembly and not easy to remove,
use the Qtip on the belt and/or pulley in place. However, if it is
stretched, flabby, or damaged, you will need to figure out how to free it.

Any belts that appear loose, flabby or do not return instantly to
their relaxed size when stretched by 25% or so will need to be replaced
and may be the cause of your problems. Belts cost about $.30-$2.00
and complete replacement belt kits are often available by model for $3.-$12.
Meanwhile, the belts will function better once they are cleaned, maybe
just enough to get by until your replacements arrive.

8. Video heads: READ CAREFULLY.

While VCRs should be cleaned periodically, the video heads themselves
usually do not need cleaning unless you have been playing old or defective
rental tapes which may leave oxide deposits on the tips of the delicate
ferrite head chips. Unless you are experiencing video snow, intermittent
color, or loss of or intermittent HiFi sound (HiFi VCRs only, the HiFi
heads are located on the video head drum) leave the video heads alone.

I have used wet type cleaning head cleaning tapes with some success.
Follow the directions but wait sufficient time for everything to dry out
or you will have a tangled mess - 15 minutes or so should do it..

To clean by hand, you will need what are called 'head cleaning sticks'.
These are covered by chamois and are safest. DO NOT USE QTIPS (COTTON
SWABS). These can catch on the ferrite cores and damage them or leave
fibers stuck in the heads. Qtips can be used for cleaning the other
parts like the rollers and audio/control head as described above but
not video heads.

To use the cleaning stick, moisten it with head cleaner or alcohol.
Pure isopropyl is best, however, the 91% medicinal stuff is ok as long
as you dry everything pretty quickly. Don't flood it as it will take
a long time to dry and you run the risk of any water in the alcohol
sitting on surfaces and resulting in rust (very unlikely, but don't
take the chance).

Gently hold the flat portion of the chamois against the upper cylinder
where it is joined to the lower (non-rotating) cylinder. Rotate the upper
cylinder be hand so that the heads brush up against the moist
chamois. DO NOT MOVE THE HEAD CLEANING STICK UP AND DOWN - you
will break the fragile ferrite of the heads - $$$$. Side
to side is ok as long as you are gentle.

Depending on how dirty your heads are, a couple of passes may
be enough. Let everything dry out for at least 1/2 hour. This
process can be repeated. However, one pass will usually do it.

The following are good sources for consumer electronics replacement parts,
especially for VCRs, TVs, and other audio and video equipment:

MCM Electronics (VCR parts, Japanese semiconductors,
1-800-543-4330. tools, test equipment, audio, consumer
electronics including microwave oven parts
and electric range elements, etc.)

Dalbani (Excellent Japanese semiconductor source,
1-800-325-2264. VCR parts, other consumer electronics,)

Premium Parts (Very complete VCR parts, some tools, adapter
1-800-558-9572. cables, other replacement parts.)

-eof-



Area: Doing your own repairs in electronics
Date: 15 Sep 01 10:59:42
From: "voltare"
Subj: VCR Head Clean [html]

How To Clean Your VCR Heads

A How-To on cleaning your VCR tape heads, head drum, and other parts inside
your VCR.

WARNING: Read this entire page and refer to additional references at the
bottom of the page before attempting this procedure.

Difficulty Level: Hard Time Required: 30 Minutes


Here's How:

a. Eject any Tape from VCR and Uplug it from wall current
b. Unplug any other cables from VCR (Cable, Antenna, Audio/Video Cables,
etc..).
c. Place VCR on flat surface such as a table covered with newspaper or
cloth to protect table surface.
d. With the appropriate screwdriver, remove VCR cover carefully.
e. You will see a shiny round drum--this is the Head Drum. Take an
isopropyl alcohol-dipped chamois tipped cleaning stick and place it on the
Head Drum with light pressure.
f. Manually rotate the Head drum with your free hand (it spins freely),
keeping the chamois stick stationary, allowing fluid to clean the drum
(never move the chamois stick in the vertical direction--you may snap off
the Head protrusions on the drum).
g. With fresh chamois tips and alcohol, now clean the Stationary audio
head, Capstans, Rollers, and Gears. Check for dust. Do not get excessive
fluid on any parts.
h. Clean Belts and Pulleys using fresh chamoise tips, once again, do not
use excessive fluid.
i. Clean dust off Circuit Boards using a mini-vacuum cleaner and/or
compressed air (use just enough force to remove the dust and dirt).
j. Let machine site a few minutes after finishing above process.
k. With the VCR still open, plug into wall and TV, turn on VCR and insert
a recorded tape. (do not touch any of the interior workings of the VCR or
interior metal cabinet during this process).
l. Press Play on VCR and confirm that everything is functioning correctly
and picture and sound is restored.
m. Repeat steps 1-10 if results are not satisfactory.
n. Eject Tape, Unplug VCR from wall, uplug all cables.
o. Screw VCR cover back on and place back in original location with
proper hookups.


Tips:

a. Do not perform the above procedure if your VCR is still covered by
Warranty or Extended Service Plan. Take unit to authorized technician
instead.
b. Make sure you have all the proper srewdriver(s), Chamois, cleaning
solution, etc... before starting Step One of this process. DO NOT USE
Q-TIPS.
c. Your Guide is not responsible for any damage to your VCR involving any
steps in this process. If you have doubts about your skill after opening the
cabinet, do not go forward. For more extensive information, check the
resources below.


Related Features:

a. Online Service Manual.
b. Tips For Extending The Life Of Your VCR
c. How A VCR Works (includes interior photos of VCR mechanisms)
d. VCR Repair: General VCR Cleaning Guide
e. VCR First Aid.

-!-



Area: sci.electronics.repair
Date: 30 Apr 95 15:28:05
From: (Tim Rudeseal)
Subj: Cleaning VCR Heads

Organization: Southern College of Technology
In article ,
(Gareth Blades) wrote:
lestat@seamonkey (lestat) wrote:

stuff deleted


I usually use a piece of plain paper, like a post-it note, and a
little IPA. I put it directly on each head and rotate back and forth
several times, repeat with another piece. I know when it is clean
when there is no longer any dirt on the paper.

-!-



Area: Doing your own repairs in electronics
Date: 13 Aug 98 16:18:24
From:
Subj: what do you use to clean VCRs ?

I'm going to catch some flak for this, but for the head chips, I use a
pencil eraser, and for the upper and lower drums, I use a Q-tip and a
solvent called Chloro-clean (a GC product). No, I don't inhale. ;-)

The pencil eraser "trick" came from a Sony Rep in the Beta days of the
late '70s. It will scour even the toughest clog and provides just
enough "give" to keep it from damaging the head chip (which I've never
done).

If the head or tape path is contaminated by sugar (soda pop), rubbing
alcohol does the initial cleanup for the tape path, then a follow up
with solvent.

Ray Carlsen
CARLSEN ELECTRONICS... a leader in trailing-edge technology.

-!-



From: Jeff Grous
To: Achim Lohse
Date: 94-05-23 23:08:00
Subj: VCR cleaning procedure

AL Now, how about a short discourse on procedure for doing the cleaning
AL properly, and what materials to use, and which to avoid especially.
AL My knowledge is limited to Q-tips and isopropyl alcohol. However, I
AL _am_ vaguely aware that the alcohol tends to dry out the rubber
AL parts, promoting cracks, and the Q-tips shed fibres, possibly
AL gumming the works. I believe the swabs also come in cotton or rayo
AL form, but have no idea whether one is preferable.

Well, here's how I do it- I use medical-grade wood swabs with dual
cotton tips for all moving parts _except_ the drum itself. The cotton
stays on the swabs, and they're tough enough so that you can REALLY get
down and scrub those stubborn stains. bg As a solvent, I will
generally use denatured alcohol, since pure ethanol is not easily
obtainable. This won't hurt the rubber parts like isopropyl will.
In really tough places I will use acetone or what we call "Grean Death,"
A.K.A. GC Radio/TV service solvent. (This stuff is basically pure
Tolulene, and is NASTY. It used to be green, and hence the name. Now
it's clear, but the lable is still green. It works GREAT on rubber
parts and stubborn spots, but will DESTROY plastic much better than
acetone. It destroys _you_ much more effectively, too. grin) Clean
EVERYTHING the tape touches until: A) the swab picks up no more crud,
or, B) you can see that the surface you're cleaning is in fact clean.
If you cannot make the pinch roller look pristine with a matte finish,
it's toast. Replace it. You can also use the swab on the lower
(non-rotating part) drum. Be sure to especially scrub the spot on the
lower drum where the tape enters and exits, this is the area that gets
dirtiest. Also, be sure that you rotate the upper drum so that the head
chips are nowhere near that swab while you clean, or you run the risk of
snagging a chip and breaking it off. Now for the last part...

I use a very tightly knitted special cotton cloth called a Texwipe for
cleaning the upper drum. You CANNOT use an ordinary cloth. You fold
the cloth into quarters, soak it in solvent and press it against the
drun with your index finger. Rotating the drum with your other hand and
keeping the cloth still will get both the chips and the surface of the
drum. Be forewarned: THIS IS NOT FOR THE FAINTHEARTED OR PEOPLE WITH
10 THUMBS. There's a "feel" to this task, and if you get it completely
wrong, you'll break a chip. It's pretty forgiving, but if you're
uncomfortable, use a clean white business card folded in half soaked in
solvent instead of the Texwipe. You won't get the head as clean, but
you won't break a chip off, either.

I don't like those foam swabs or the chamois sticks, they grab head
chips too easily. If you can't get any Texwipes, drop me a note and
I'll send ya a couple.

Short? Well, guess not... good luck!

-Jeff

-!-



.... "Bother!" said Pooh, as he saw the sparks and smelled the smoke.

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