Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default Repairing A Variac

Got this nice 0-140 5 amp variac that started arcing. Iunplugged it immediately of course.

It had been repaired before. When I first got it the wire feeding from the AC input had pulled the turn of the winding off, soldering took care of that. There was a little catch right at that point but it wasn't bad. Months, maybe about a year ago that "catch" got worse and I reworked it, tightening up the winding and making sure it was smooth. It was fine.

Then about last week I was using it to boost voltage to a car battery charger to feed something a tad over its usual output, which was working fine. And no overload at all, the drain was about 2.5 amps at 16 volts or so, so that was well within spec for the variac. Later I turned it down because it was time to test the UUT with lower voltage. (this is an intermittent overheating problem in the DC/DC convertor of an AC/DC version of the Tek 422)

Then I noticed that at the end, above where the line goes in, it was arcing between the windings.

I don't have nor want to find the magnet wire to rewind or partially rewind this thing. Is there a chemical solution to this problem ? (pun intended)

Perhaps our resident thaumaturge Jeff Lieberman has some idea, or anyone. I don't use it enough to buy another one but when I need variable AC I need variable AC. I might have to add some boost/buck transformers to my newly kludged bohungus isolation transformer. It even has a fan.

http://usr.audioasylum.com/images/7/...badazzis01.jpg

As you can see there is plenty of room for a few smaller transformers, but I would need them to be able to handle the current of the main one, right ? Otherwise an overload could be a catastrophe, and I have had enough of those in my life.

But is there a way to fix the variac ? I'm thinking a solvent, then enamel, then filing it down for the wiper to contact and ??? Maybe. I don't know if I can find such chemicals, or if they even exist. And how would I keep the windings on place once they're stripped ?

Any ideas ?

Also, I am not all that worried about the boost end of it, ans I am not concerned with ground faults because I can just always run it off isolation. It will almost fit n that cabinet but not with the knob in front, and I don't want it on top. But then it might be ready for the dump anyway.

Thanks in advance.
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On Monday, 30 April 2018 13:50:53 UTC+1, wrote:
Got this nice 0-140 5 amp variac that started arcing. Iunplugged it immediately of course.

It had been repaired before. When I first got it the wire feeding from the AC input had pulled the turn of the winding off, soldering took care of that. There was a little catch right at that point but it wasn't bad. Months, maybe about a year ago that "catch" got worse and I reworked it, tightening up the winding and making sure it was smooth. It was fine.

Then about last week I was using it to boost voltage to a car battery charger to feed something a tad over its usual output, which was working fine. And no overload at all, the drain was about 2.5 amps at 16 volts or so, so that was well within spec for the variac. Later I turned it down because it was time to test the UUT with lower voltage. (this is an intermittent overheating problem in the DC/DC convertor of an AC/DC version of the Tek 422)

Then I noticed that at the end, above where the line goes in, it was arcing between the windings.

I don't have nor want to find the magnet wire to rewind or partially rewind this thing. Is there a chemical solution to this problem ? (pun intended)

Perhaps our resident thaumaturge Jeff Lieberman has some idea, or anyone. I don't use it enough to buy another one but when I need variable AC I need variable AC. I might have to add some boost/buck transformers to my newly kludged bohungus isolation transformer. It even has a fan.

http://usr.audioasylum.com/images/7/...badazzis01.jpg

As you can see there is plenty of room for a few smaller transformers, but I would need them to be able to handle the current of the main one, right ? Otherwise an overload could be a catastrophe, and I have had enough of those in my life.

But is there a way to fix the variac ? I'm thinking a solvent, then enamel, then filing it down for the wiper to contact and ??? Maybe. I don't know if I can find such chemicals, or if they even exist. And how would I keep the windings on place once they're stripped ?

Any ideas ?

Also, I am not all that worried about the boost end of it, ans I am not concerned with ground faults because I can just always run it off isolation. It will almost fit n that cabinet but not with the knob in front, and I don't want it on top. But then it might be ready for the dump anyway.

Thanks in advance.


Variacs are never ready for the dump.
If you can get all traces of the carbon out from the gap, you're most of the way there. If not, and I expect you won't, I'd cut the wire and unwind half a turn each side. Put a turn of new wire on & solder its ends to the old ends where they're not in the way. With 2 half turns out the way it should be easier to remove any carbon.


NT
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http://www.directindustry.com/prod/e...tm_campaign=CA

Used its equivalent - it works.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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On 30/04/2018 13:50, wrote:
Got this nice 0-140 5 amp variac that started arcing. Iunplugged it immediately of course.

It had been repaired before. When I first got it the wire feeding from the AC input had pulled the turn of the winding off, soldering took care of that. There was a little catch right at that point but it wasn't bad. Months, maybe about a year ago that "catch" got worse and I reworked it, tightening up the winding and making sure it was smooth. It was fine.

Then about last week I was using it to boost voltage to a car battery charger to feed something a tad over its usual output, which was working fine. And no overload at all, the drain was about 2.5 amps at 16 volts or so, so that was well within spec for the variac. Later I turned it down because it was time to test the UUT with lower voltage. (this is an intermittent overheating problem in the DC/DC convertor of an AC/DC version of the Tek 422)

Then I noticed that at the end, above where the line goes in, it was arcing between the windings.

I don't have nor want to find the magnet wire to rewind or partially rewind this thing. Is there a chemical solution to this problem ? (pun intended)

Perhaps our resident thaumaturge Jeff Lieberman has some idea, or anyone. I don't use it enough to buy another one but when I need variable AC I need variable AC. I might have to add some boost/buck transformers to my newly kludged bohungus isolation transformer. It even has a fan.

http://usr.audioasylum.com/images/7/...badazzis01.jpg

As you can see there is plenty of room for a few smaller transformers, but I would need them to be able to handle the current of the main one, right ? Otherwise an overload could be a catastrophe, and I have had enough of those in my life.

But is there a way to fix the variac ? I'm thinking a solvent, then enamel, then filing it down for the wiper to contact and ??? Maybe. I don't know if I can find such chemicals, or if they even exist. And how would I keep the windings on place once they're stripped ?

Any ideas ?

Also, I am not all that worried about the boost end of it, ans I am not concerned with ground faults because I can just always run it off isolation. It will almost fit n that cabinet but not with the knob in front, and I don't want it on top. But then it might be ready for the dump anyway.

Thanks in advance.


Does it have the correct width of brush? it must not be able to contact
more than 2 turns at any time. The proper ones look suspiciously unmanly
for the job.
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On 2018/04/30 6:17 AM, wrote:
http://www.directindustry.com/prod/e...tm_campaign=CA

Used its equivalent - it works.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Peter, does that have a suitable breakdown voltage for 130 - 150VAC? I
didn't bother sending the manufacturer my email address so they would
send me the docs to verify. However the ad says it is suitable for LEDs
and circuit boards, doesn't mention higher voltage applications.

For the OP be really sure to clean between the windings where the arcing
occurred, you want to remove any sharp edges or points on the wire or
any carbon residue. There are dialectic varnishes designed for higher
voltages such as MG Chemicals Corona Dope:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products...rona-dope-4226


John :-#)#


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On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 8:50:53 AM UTC-4, wrote:
Got this nice 0-140 5 amp variac that started arcing. Iunplugged it immediately of course.

It had been repaired before. When I first got it the wire feeding from the AC input had pulled the turn of the winding off, soldering took care of that. There was a little catch right at that point but it wasn't bad. Months, maybe about a year ago that "catch" got worse and I reworked it, tightening up the winding and making sure it was smooth. It was fine.

Then about last week I was using it to boost voltage to a car battery charger to feed something a tad over its usual output, which was working fine. And no overload at all, the drain was about 2.5 amps at 16 volts or so, so that was well within spec for the variac. Later I turned it down because it was time to test the UUT with lower voltage. (this is an intermittent overheating problem in the DC/DC convertor of an AC/DC version of the Tek 422)

Then I noticed that at the end, above where the line goes in, it was arcing between the windings.

I don't have nor want to find the magnet wire to rewind or partially rewind this thing. Is there a chemical solution to this problem ? (pun intended)

Perhaps our resident thaumaturge Jeff Lieberman has some idea, or anyone. I don't use it enough to buy another one but when I need variable AC I need variable AC. I might have to add some boost/buck transformers to my newly kludged bohungus isolation transformer. It even has a fan.

http://usr.audioasylum.com/images/7/...badazzis01.jpg

As you can see there is plenty of room for a few smaller transformers, but I would need them to be able to handle the current of the main one, right ? Otherwise an overload could be a catastrophe, and I have had enough of those in my life.

But is there a way to fix the variac ? I'm thinking a solvent, then enamel, then filing it down for the wiper to contact and ??? Maybe. I don't know if I can find such chemicals, or if they even exist. And how would I keep the windings on place once they're stripped ?

Any ideas ?

Also, I am not all that worried about the boost end of it, ans I am not concerned with ground faults because I can just always run it off isolation. It will almost fit n that cabinet but not with the knob in front, and I don't want it on top. But then it might be ready for the dump anyway.

Thanks in advance.


Remember the Mitsubishi deflection yokes that used to arc over on the PTVs? Back in the old days, I'd just kind of gently pick apart the area where the arcing occurred, clean as best I could, and dose it with several layers of thin cyanoacrylate. That stuff penetrates almost like Kroil. Of course, those windings were much thinner and easier to move around. Not advice really, just reminiscing.
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On Monday, 30 April 2018 18:57:01 UTC+1, John Robertson wrote:
On 2018/04/30 6:17 AM, wrote:
http://www.directindustry.com/prod/e...tm_campaign=CA

Used its equivalent - it works.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


Peter, does that have a suitable breakdown voltage for 130 - 150VAC? I
didn't bother sending the manufacturer my email address so they would
send me the docs to verify. However the ad says it is suitable for LEDs
and circuit boards, doesn't mention higher voltage applications.

For the OP be really sure to clean between the windings where the arcing
occurred, you want to remove any sharp edges or points on the wire or
any carbon residue. There are dialectic varnishes designed for higher
voltages such as MG Chemicals Corona Dope:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products...rona-dope-4226


John :-#)#


removing every little trace of carbon is vital IME


NT
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On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 1:57:01 PM UTC-4, John Robertson wrote:

Peter, does that have a suitable breakdown voltage for 130 - 150VAC? I
didn't bother sending the manufacturer my email address so they would
send me the docs to verify. However the ad says it is suitable for LEDs
and circuit boards, doesn't mention higher voltage applications.


John:

I must admit I am not sure. I used its functional equivalent on a Hot Tub control board switching 240 VAC heater and 120 VAC pump circuits without any problems - but for the heater on one just failed this weekend. Not the board, the heater itself. I suspect that the material you linked might be more suitable given its brush applicator and specific prescribed uses.

For the OP be really sure to clean between the windings where the arcing
occurred, you want to remove any sharp edges or points on the wire or
any carbon residue. There are dialectic varnishes designed for higher
voltages such as MG Chemicals Corona Dope:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products...rona-dope-4226


The 'thing' about AC arcing is that once an arc is struck, the plasma generated helps sustain it. Hard to strike, but once struck not hard to maintain if there is a source for the plasma. Just a few weeks ago, a large Norway maple tree behind us started rubbing against a 13,200 primary. Those arcs made 6-8 inches until sufficient of the tree was eroded that the distance eventually was too much. PECO took nearly a week to get to it as the heavy snow and wind that caused the condition in the first place did far more damage elsewhere. 90 houses around us were without power for 4 days. We were exceedingly lucky not to.

When PECO did come, they worked from our back yard, and I got 'the dope' on arcing from their engineer on-site.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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On 2018/04/30 11:39 AM, wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 1:57:01 PM UTC-4, John Robertson wrote:

Peter, does that have a suitable breakdown voltage for 130 - 150VAC? I
didn't bother sending the manufacturer my email address so they would
send me the docs to verify. However the ad says it is suitable for LEDs
and circuit boards, doesn't mention higher voltage applications.


John:

I must admit I am not sure. I used its functional equivalent on a Hot Tub control board switching 240 VAC heater and 120 VAC pump circuits without any problems - but for the heater on one just failed this weekend. Not the board, the heater itself. I suspect that the material you linked might be more suitable given its brush applicator and specific prescribed uses.

For the OP be really sure to clean between the windings where the arcing
occurred, you want to remove any sharp edges or points on the wire or
any carbon residue. There are dialectic varnishes designed for higher
voltages such as MG Chemicals Corona Dope:

https://www.mgchemicals.com/products...rona-dope-4226

The 'thing' about AC arcing is that once an arc is struck, the plasma generated helps sustain it. Hard to strike, but once struck not hard to maintain if there is a source for the plasma. Just a few weeks ago, a large Norway maple tree behind us started rubbing against a 13,200 primary. Those arcs made 6-8 inches until sufficient of the tree was eroded that the distance eventually was too much. PECO took nearly a week to get to it as the heavy snow and wind that caused the condition in the first place did far more damage elsewhere. 90 houses around us were without power for 4 days. We were exceedingly lucky not to.

When PECO did come, they worked from our back yard, and I got 'the dope' on arcing from their engineer on-site.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


A Jacob's Ladder is an excellent example of how an AC or DC arc plasma,
once started, can more than double its initial width as the plasma
climbs up the wires...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ioHlYCmu_A

https://www.popsci.com/how-to-build-jacobs-ladder

I had one in my parents home where I had a fat 5KV Neon sign Xformer -
which made nice fat arcs, but that was way back in the 60s...

John :-#)#
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Thanks folks, I'll look into these options and try it.
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 15:45:19 -0500, Fox's Mercantile
wrote:

don't worry about carbon tracks, if you ppur this stuff
https://www.ebay.com/itm/152789446463
over the part that's arcing, the carbon will be encapsulated.


I don't know how it's possible to arc between windings with only
117/220VAC. My guess(tm) is that there's arcing between the contact
brush and the windings caused by a layer of filth on the windings or
contact brush.

No way am I going to pay $18 for 2 oz of Q-Dope.
Q-Dope is polystyrene disolved in MEK.
http://www.gcelectronics.com/order/msds/101.pdf
Make your own from packing peanuts and MEK:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANn6hti35Zc

Maybe some anti-corona goo will provide some better arcing protection:
https://www.mgchemicals.com/products/insulating-coatings/super-corona-dope-4226
https://www.amazon.com/MG-Chemicals-Corona-Liquid-Applicator/dp/B008OA7CAE

Variac cleaning videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vKHOSpynM8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPdIrzw2kko
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbbght6HIxM
etc...

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http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 18:43:11 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:
(...)

This kinda sounds like the arcing problem as described. The arcing is
from the winding to the carbon brush wiper:

Variac Repair using DeOxit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRTKHNoiRQI

However, I'm not sure that's such a great idea. It looks like he
managed to burn up the Variac:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po5Xxl_Syxg


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http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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"This kinda sounds like the arcing problem as described. The arcing is from the winding to the carbon brush wiper: "

No, the wiper was nowhere near it. It is either between the windings or from the windings to the core.

From what I see there are probably 100 turns, if not there must be at least 50. That means only a couple volts between each turn. This is not hopeful.

Since it all seems to be at the boost end, maybe I can eliminate that part and just have something that will cut the line voltage. It beats nothing.

There is another possibility, I could put the rectifiers back in the "isolation transformer" cabinet and use the DC supplies which are + - 90 volts to power a class D amp. I know they can get hairy to design like for high fidelity audio but for these lower frequencies it should not be all that difficult. Or I could tap off an existing class D amp before the output filter (except for certain Crowns et. al.)and use that to drive bigger transistors, set up a feedback attenuator to match the level and make a bigger output filter. It would be easier than designing from scratch. It would also automatically be isolated.

But honestly that is a pipe dream. Maybe I should just think about eliminating that part of the winding and hope the rest is alright. Seems like that would be the hottest part of the winding and would fail first, no ? For the amount of time I use it...

Soon, I'll take the cover off and have a closer look at this arcing. But I am sure it is not to the wiper.
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On Tuesday, 1 May 2018 04:26:18 UTC+1, wrote:

"This kinda sounds like the arcing problem as described. The arcing is from the winding to the carbon brush wiper: "


No, the wiper was nowhere near it. It is either between the windings or from the windings to the core.

From what I see there are probably 100 turns, if not there must be at least 50. That means only a couple volts between each turn. This is not hopeful.

Since it all seems to be at the boost end, maybe I can eliminate that part and just have something that will cut the line voltage. It beats nothing.

There is another possibility, I could put the rectifiers back in the "isolation transformer" cabinet and use the DC supplies which are + - 90 volts to power a class D amp. I know they can get hairy to design like for high fidelity audio but for these lower frequencies it should not be all that difficult. Or I could tap off an existing class D amp before the output filter (except for certain Crowns et. al.)and use that to drive bigger transistors, set up a feedback attenuator to match the level and make a bigger output filter. It would be easier than designing from scratch. It would also automatically be isolated.

But honestly that is a pipe dream. Maybe I should just think about eliminating that part of the winding and hope the rest is alright. Seems like that would be the hottest part of the winding and would fail first, no ? For the amount of time I use it...

Soon, I'll take the cover off and have a closer look at this arcing. But I am sure it is not to the wiper.


if it's a small section of winding, how hard is it to rewind that bit?


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On 2018/04/30 8:26 PM, wrote:
"This kinda sounds like the arcing problem as described. The arcing is from the winding to the carbon brush wiper:"


No, the wiper was nowhere near it. It is either between the windings or from the windings to the core.

From what I see there are probably 100 turns, if not there must be at least 50. That means only a couple volts between each turn. This is not hopeful.

Since it all seems to be at the boost end, maybe I can eliminate that part and just have something that will cut the line voltage. It beats nothing.

There is another possibility, I could put the rectifiers back in the "isolation transformer" cabinet and use the DC supplies which are + - 90 volts to power a class D amp. I know they can get hairy to design like for high fidelity audio but for these lower frequencies it should not be all that difficult. Or I could tap off an existing class D amp before the output filter (except for certain Crowns et. al.)and use that to drive bigger transistors, set up a feedback attenuator to match the level and make a bigger output filter. It would be easier than designing from scratch. It would also automatically be isolated.

But honestly that is a pipe dream. Maybe I should just think about eliminating that part of the winding and hope the rest is alright. Seems like that would be the hottest part of the winding and would fail first, no ? For the amount of time I use it...

Soon, I'll take the cover off and have a closer look at this arcing. But I am sure it is not to the wiper.


I trust the variac is grounded, so this may be an arc to the case...or
failing insulation on the power cord. How OLD is this variac anyway?

John :-#(#

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On 4/30/18 11:14 PM, John Robertson wrote:
I trust the variac is grounded, so this may be an arc to
the case...or failing insulation on the power cord. How
OLD is this variac anyway?


Since it's on the "hgh" (boost) of the variac, He's got
between 120=135 vac to gound at that point.

And knowing Jurb, it's probably something he fished out of
a dumpster 30 years ago.
He's already admitted to "fixing" it twice already.
I doubt he did a good job either time.


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On Tuesday, 1 May 2018 05:55:01 UTC+1, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 4/30/18 11:14 PM, John Robertson wrote:


I trust the variac is grounded, so this may be an arc to
the case...or failing insulation on the power cord. How
OLD is this variac anyway?


Since it's on the "hgh" (boost) of the variac, He's got
between 120=135 vac to gound at that point.

And knowing Jurb, it's probably something he fished out of
a dumpster 30 years ago.
He's already admitted to "fixing" it twice already.
I doubt he did a good job either time.


Variacs are all (or almost all) many decades old.


NT
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https://www.circuitspecialists.com/variac-tdgc2-2.html

There was a discussion on another group that discovered that 100% of these particular units from one particular run had the Hot and Neutral wires reversed by color. When repaired, 30% of them overheated. When returned, the company refused to refund stating that the repair (reversing the wires) voided the warranty. In a word, China.

http://www.iseincstore.com/3pn1010bv...chandfuse.aspx

You get what you pay for in electrical equipment. Shoddy/defective goods can kill. And sometimes do.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA



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"if it's a small section of winding, how hard is it to rewind that bit? "

Probably not that bad, but I have to get the exact size magnet wire, and then file it down to be flat for the wiper to contact. The fact that I almost always use it in cut not boost makes just eliminating that part of the winding a viable option.
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"I trust the variac is grounded, so this may be an arc to the case...or failing insulation on the power cord. How OLD is this variac anyway? "

It is not grounded at all. So it must be arcing to the core but there must be another arc somewhere where it is at a lower voltage. It's not looking good. I wonder if it is even worth doing anything with.

And age ? It is old enough not to be grounded. I mean it does not have a 3 prong plug, and neither the cord or the outlet are even polarized.

It is not a spring chicken.
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"And knowing Jurb, it's probably something he fished out of
a dumpster 30 years ago. "

First of all, while it was given to me it did not come from a dumpster. And you don't know me, don't assume you do. To do so shows willful ignorance and bad attitude. And of course the immaturity not to realize it, accept it and change for the better. You want to be an asshole so what. Unless I care what you say means jack ****.

"He's already admitted to "fixing" it twice already. "


Admit ? So there's something wrong with fixing things ? I think there is something wrong with YOU. This is sci.electronics.REPAIR, where the **** do you think you are ?

"I doubt he did a good job either time. "


Have you ever even seen my work at all ? Do you have cameras on me ? Did you have cameras at my bench when I was making $ 34 an hour, setting my own hours and was pretty much second in command at work ? How can you say anything ? What you do it called talking out your ass around here.

And the FACT that you talk about things you obviously know absolutely nothing about brings into question your credibility on everything. But then you're not known for constructive advice, you only bitch. bitch about thinks you don't even know. what does that make you ?

If you don't like me, don't respond. That is unless you do just to hear yourself bitch, which is starting to look like what it is with you.

You might just end up like Slowman, talking to yourself.
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"Variacs are all (or almost all) many decades old. "

I would say almost and that is because they are not as useful these days. Most brownwares today won't turn on at too low a voltage, even though their power supply would regulate. Even audio amps, on which the use of a variac was common, they also won't fire up at too low a voltage. You have to jump out relays n **** like that. Computers will start but the PS is practically considered replace only, except in case of the **** ones with the proprietary wimpy PSes which are smaller and also fan the processor so you can't use a standard form factor. And this **** is getting more common because businesses want a PC that screws right to the back of the monitor, like in hospitals these days. Fixing those PSes might make a comeback as people get sick of paying 4 or more times as much for an inferior product. But again, I think in some cases even though they would run on the lower voltage, the might not start.

So it's not surprising not to find them all over the place.


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"Not all are decades old: "

For 100 bucks it is worth a crack at fixing. Even if it is cut only.
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OK - from 20,000 feet, and with over 45 years around electricity, some of it with a license, if I were to attempt to fix this beast, I would make sure it met *ALL* the proper life-safety requirements. If windings are shorting internally, then the insulation below them is compromised. Fish Paper comes to mind, then dielectric varnish.

If there are any doubts, the device goes off to the salvage yard forthwith. Perhaps I am OK with messing about with unsafe stuff, but I may not be the end-of-the-line.

As Kutztown is at the end of next week, there will be good Variacs a-plenty from an amp or two up to 20 amp monsters, most of them selling for less than their salvage value. These things are neither scarce nor expensive if one knows where to look.

I keep two Heathkit IP 5220 Iso-Variacs A small write-up with pictures is attached below (not mine).

http://www.byan-roper.org/steve/stev...-variable.html

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


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"http://www.iseincstore.com/3pn1010bvariabletransformer120vacsinglephaseinput0-140vacoutput10acasedmodelwithcordplugreceptaclelig htedswitchandfuse.aspx

You get what you pay for in electrical equipment. Shoddy/defective goods can kill. And sometimes do. "

YIKES ! 455 bucks ? Maybe I'll spend more than 5 minutes on it. In fact maybe I'll count the turns and put a micrometer on the wire, see if It can get me some.

If I do all that I will probably upgrade it a bit with a grounded cord and outlet. Maybe get one of those small DVM modules...
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"As Kutztown is at the end of next week..."

Kutztown ? Do they have like a mini hamfest type of thing there ?
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On 5/1/2018 7:01 AM, wrote:
https://www.circuitspecialists.com/variac-tdgc2-2.html

There was a discussion on another group that discovered that 100% of these particular units from one particular run had the Hot and Neutral wires reversed by color. When repaired, 30% of them overheated. When returned, the company refused to refund stating that the repair (reversing the wires) voided the warranty. In a word, China.

http://www.iseincstore.com/3pn1010bv...chandfuse.aspx

You get what you pay for in electrical equipment. Shoddy/defective goods can kill. And sometimes do.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA



Damn, I sold a couple to cheap!
Mikek

But, I didn't have to haul them home!


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On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 10:25:24 AM UTC-4, wrote:
"As Kutztown is at the end of next week..."


Kutztown ? Do they have like a mini hamfest type of thing there ?


http://www.dvhrc.com/kutztown.html

Not so mini. A few hundred dealers, 2.5 days, a pretty good auction, fireworks, food, fun and so forth. Twice per year, this will be Kutztown XXXVIII.

I run a vintage radio clinic at the Club Table - diagnosis and basic repairs - for those who wish to learn.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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"[ usual chest beating drivel..."

That's the best you can do bitch ?
You're alot of fun, know that ? It's like teasing some **** with a piece of candy. No wait, it is nowhere near that challenging.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Nice to have time on my hands. Now lesse, that court case you mentioned. If it is not total bull**** then you should be findable. No court order or anything. Box of envelopes, some stamps, LASER printer.

When did you stop beating your Wife ? Doing crack ? Molesting little boys ? Ascared to answer ?

Be patient, I might have to break into my stash and buy some toner and paper.

Hmmm, Motorola, I know it is in my history. But then maybe it was a figment of someone's imagination, like their maturity, their competence, their common sense not to say **** they obviously know absolutely nothing about. We'll see.

BTW, expert witness on what ? Fellatio ?
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Typical Murphy's law. Got it all apart, fired it up and no sign of arcing.

Do I run it apart forever or paste a picture of myself inside ? (I know the latter might be a scary thought but sometimes more severe measures are required)
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"It worked, it got you all wound up in a knot. "

No it didn't, I just put you in your place nice and calm like.

Was it goood for you baby ?
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Equus mortuus.
Non remanebit mortuum.
Continua percussione, non obstantibus quibuscumque.
Fiat ei requiem.

"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results."

Einstein

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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On Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at 2:52:24 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Equus mortuus.
Non remanebit mortuum.
Continua percussione, non obstantibus quibuscumque.
Fiat ei requiem.

"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results."

Einstein

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


ipse puer possit
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On Tue, 1 May 2018 12:52:21 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

Equus mortuus.
Non remanebit mortuum.
Continua percussione, non obstantibus quibuscumque.
Fiat ei requiem.


https://www.google.com/search?q=translate%3A+Equus+mortuus.++Non+remanebi t+mortuum.+Continua+percussione%2C+non+obstantibus +quibuscumque.+Fiat+ei+requiem.
The horse is dead. It will remain dead. The stroke of the connected
activities, and in spite of whatever kind. Let it rest.

"The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results."
Einstein


Therefore, the definition of sanity must be doing different things on
each attempt, which sounds much like trial and error.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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