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wasps behind the cedar shingles



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 24th 04, 07:55 AM
bill
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Default wasps behind the cedar shingles

I have wood shingle siding. Instead of putting it up normally, the
builder has strips of wood (about 1/2 inch) under the butt end of the
shingle, so they stick out further than usual. Don't know if this was
an attemp to look like (more expensive) shakes or who knows what else.
(1953 house)

There are many, many gaps in these wood strips: maybe that is to allow
moisture to get out? Best I can tell, there is no wall insulation and
no sheething under the shingles. (From identical neighboring houses,
I've seen sort of a paper barrier. Maybe those strips are meant to be
nailers?

Anyway, the wasps have decided this year that they would go up through
the gaps in the strips and hang out under the shingles. Problem is,
there is no way to spray up in there. I've sprayed a bunch of times
but they're back around the next day.

I was thinking of using a hose connected to a funnel, which I could
put over a small charcoal fire (may 3 or 4 briquets). Then push the
hose a little way up one of the gaps in the strips. The big question
in my mind: is carbon monoxide heavier or lighter than air?

Any other ideas? I've managed to get rid of most of the other wasps
around, but this bunch has found themselves a good spot.

Thanks
Bill


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  #2  
Old August 24th 04, 09:30 AM
PaPaPeng
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 06:55:01 GMT, "bill"
wrote:

I was thinking of using a hose connected to a funnel, which I could
put over a small charcoal fire (may 3 or 4 briquets). Then push the
hose a little way up one of the gaps in the strips. The big question
in my mind: is carbon monoxide heavier or lighter than air?



Just last week a 16 year old boy in BC did a similar thing, use
fire/smoke near the eaves to drive out wasps, and burned down the
whole house.

But your idea has a precedent. Beekeepers use smoke pots to calm down
their bees. The smoke will likely drive them out but won't kill the
wasps. One innovation I read about years ago is to use spray net (by
women to hold down their hair if there is still such a product)
instead of insecticides. It grounds the insects where you can kill
them or let the ants do it.
  #3  
Old August 24th 04, 11:45 AM
Joseph Meehan
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Default

bill wrote:
I have wood shingle siding. Instead of putting it up normally, the
builder has strips of wood (about 1/2 inch) under the butt end of the
shingle, so they stick out further than usual. Don't know if this was
an attemp to look like (more expensive) shakes or who knows what else.
(1953 house)

There are many, many gaps in these wood strips: maybe that is to allow
moisture to get out? Best I can tell, there is no wall insulation and
no sheething under the shingles. (From identical neighboring houses,
I've seen sort of a paper barrier. Maybe those strips are meant to be
nailers?

Anyway, the wasps have decided this year that they would go up through
the gaps in the strips and hang out under the shingles. Problem is,
there is no way to spray up in there. I've sprayed a bunch of times
but they're back around the next day.

I was thinking of using a hose connected to a funnel, which I could
put over a small charcoal fire (may 3 or 4 briquets). Then push the
hose a little way up one of the gaps in the strips. The big question
in my mind: is carbon monoxide heavier or lighter than air?

Any other ideas? I've managed to get rid of most of the other wasps
around, but this bunch has found themselves a good spot.

Thanks
Bill



Yes CO is lighter than air. However I am not sure your idea will work
well.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math



  #4  
Old August 24th 04, 02:00 PM
Speedy Jim
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bill wrote:

I have wood shingle siding. Instead of putting it up normally, the
builder has strips of wood (about 1/2 inch) under the butt end of the
shingle, so they stick out further than usual. Don't know if this was
an attemp to look like (more expensive) shakes or who knows what else.
(1953 house)

There are many, many gaps in these wood strips: maybe that is to allow
moisture to get out? Best I can tell, there is no wall insulation and
no sheething under the shingles. (From identical neighboring houses,
I've seen sort of a paper barrier. Maybe those strips are meant to be
nailers?

Anyway, the wasps have decided this year that they would go up through
the gaps in the strips and hang out under the shingles. Problem is,
there is no way to spray up in there. I've sprayed a bunch of times
but they're back around the next day.


SNIP

My cedar shingle siding is tightly nailed with only some
small gaps between the shingles. The wasps manage to get
in there anyway.
I leave them alone. They're not a threat to anyone (at least
the variety we have here) and I understand they do a service in
catching small insects.
In any event, I don't think I want to impregnate the entire
shell of the house with insecticides (your CO idea is a different case).

Jim
 




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