A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Home Repair
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old June 18th 06, 03:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??

The good news is I got 9 older aluminum frame double-hung windows to go
in the barn I just built (garage, workshop etc).... Free!

The Bad News is that they were lying outside, flat on their backs, for
a year, and most have water INSIDE the thermopane windows. Many have
dripping, moving water, a couple are just fogged.

Has anyone tackled windows this bad???

These are the type that have an obvious gasket around the edges, and
aluminum spacers about 1/4 inch thick.

I know I'll have to force dry air thru them somehow... So there seems
to be 2 questions:

1. How to access the inside area:
-- Drill thru side space after removing from frame (or thru frame??)
???
-- Drill thru the GLASS with appropriate drill.

I saw some Miracle System that has (is looking for) dealers etc, that
appears to put a patch of some kind in the corner of the window, I
assume ?? they drill holes....

2. Getting dry air:
-- Buy tank of dry nitrogen or argon ?? Regulator etc.... Maybe I
wanted a MIG welder??
-- Make a container for Silica Gel, and recycle it occasionally.
-- Make a air dryer with an old refrigerator?? Hey, Shop Beer goes
there too...

There's (almost) always an upside to every dumb thing that happens....

Any pointers, advice appreciated...

Regards, Terry King ...On The Mediterranean in Carthage
(Back ...In The Barn In Vermont for the Summer)

Ads
  #2  
Old June 18th 06, 04:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??

wrote:
The good news is I got 9 older aluminum frame double-hung windows to
go in the barn I just built (garage, workshop etc).... Free!

The Bad News is that they were lying outside, flat on their backs, for
a year, and most have water INSIDE the thermopane windows. Many have
dripping, moving water, a couple are just fogged.

Has anyone tackled windows this bad???

These are the type that have an obvious gasket around the edges, and
aluminum spacers about 1/4 inch thick.

I know I'll have to force dry air thru them somehow... So there seems
to be 2 questions:

1. How to access the inside area:
-- Drill thru side space after removing from frame (or thru frame??)
???
-- Drill thru the GLASS with appropriate drill.

I saw some Miracle System that has (is looking for) dealers etc, that
appears to put a patch of some kind in the corner of the window, I
assume ?? they drill holes....

2. Getting dry air:
-- Buy tank of dry nitrogen or argon ?? Regulator etc.... Maybe I
wanted a MIG welder??
-- Make a container for Silica Gel, and recycle it occasionally.
-- Make a air dryer with an old refrigerator?? Hey, Shop Beer goes
there too...

There's (almost) always an upside to every dumb thing that happens....

Any pointers, advice appreciated...

Regards, Terry King ...On The Mediterranean in Carthage
(Back ...In The Barn In Vermont for the Summer)


I don't believe there is any reasonable way to salvage theromopane
windows once the seal have been broken. I suggest new glass.

BTW your storage methods need to be improved. :-)

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


  #3  
Old June 18th 06, 11:42 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??


wrote in message
ups.com...
The good news is I got 9 older aluminum frame double-hung windows to go
in the barn I just built (garage, workshop etc).... Free!

The Bad News is that they were lying outside, flat on their backs, for
a year, and most have water INSIDE the thermopane windows. Many have
dripping, moving water, a couple are just fogged.

Well, that is probably why they were free. Replacement glass panels will
likely cost almost as much as new thermopane windows, unless they are a
stock size.

Seeing as how this is a barn, do you really care if they are full
double-pane insulating quality, or if they are a little foggy? You could
lean them upright someplace in direct sun, and drill through the seal on the
low end to drain the water. In a few days they would probably look okay
enough for barn use. Double panes will provide some extra insulation, albeit
not as much as 'dry air' filled ones. If you don't mind the fog in damp
weather, good enough.

Now if you want them pretty, yes, you are looking at getting fresh glass.
Usually best to take the frames into the glass shop and have them change
them- even experts screw up the installs at times, and if you haven't done
it before, you will likely hose up a couple doing it yourself.

aem sends...


  #4  
Old June 19th 06, 12:26 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??

ameijers wrote:
wrote in message
ups.com...
The good news is I got 9 older aluminum frame double-hung windows to
go in the barn I just built (garage, workshop etc).... Free!

The Bad News is that they were lying outside, flat on their backs,
for a year, and most have water INSIDE the thermopane windows. Many
have dripping, moving water, a couple are just fogged.

Well, that is probably why they were free. Replacement glass panels
will likely cost almost as much as new thermopane windows, unless
they are a stock size.


I don't know about where you are, but my local supplier does custom work
very reasonably.


--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


  #5  
Old June 19th 06, 01:09 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??

ameijers wrote:

If the fogging is a problem in the barn for you, pull the
glass sandwich from the frames. Cut the panes apart with a
razor knife and scrape off all the old sealant. Some
desiccants, silica gel, can be regenerated by either nuking
them in a microwave oven or oven placed on self clean.
Others need a vacuum to be dried out. In either event, dump
the old desiccant and try to regenerate it. If you can't,
then go to a hobby store and buy a pound or two of new
silica gel. It's used for drying flowers, for instance.

Refill the channels separating the glass sheets after you
very thoroughly clean the glass. Silicone sealer will work
for several years, but my own little "trick" is to cut
aluminum foil to 2" wide and place it over the silicone
sealer while it's still uncured. That is a REAL vapor
barrier, IMHO. Pros use a 2-part polysulfide, but unless
you can get a glass company to sell you some, along with a
gun, you're out of luck there.

An alternative is to take the panes to a glass supply house
and get a quote for cleaning and resealing by a pro.

Nonnymus
  #6  
Old June 19th 06, 07:28 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Water, not just fogging, in Thermopane Windows. What2Do??

Nonnymus wrote:

If the fogging is a problem in the barn for you, pull the
glass sandwich from the frames. Cut the panes apart with a
razor knife and scrape off all the old sealant. Some
desiccants, silica gel, can be regenerated by either nuking
them in a microwave oven or oven placed on self clean.
Others need a vacuum to be dried out.


A vacuum sounds more convenient, with a small stiff hose to a hole in
the spacers between the panes that gets plugged up later? We might
connect the other end of the hose to the top of a pressure cooker,
after boiling a little water inside.

Nick

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hot Water Recirculator Comfort Valve Inefficiencies Cost More Then An Outlet Install [email protected] Home Repair 0 April 21st 06 01:13 AM
Salt content of softened water Steve B Home Repair 26 January 25th 06 05:06 AM
Windows [email protected] Home Repair 7 January 21st 06 02:06 PM
The #1 rated home water filter in America Aquasana AQ-4000 nitin Home Ownership 0 December 13th 05 09:44 AM
Brown's gas?? T.Alan Kraus Metalworking 16 December 9th 05 08:36 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.