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Old December 4th 04, 06:42 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default Rotten cedar boards, any way to protect them.


"Gino" wrote in message

I have access to cedar boards full 1"x6" that sat too long and rotted in
the
middle. Run through the planer they have a beautiful lacy look.
I love the way they look and they are still plenty strong on the edges.
But because they have started to rot they absorb water like a sponge.
I would like to use them as a garden fence but I doubt they would last
long.
Is there any reasonably priced UV sealer that might help these boards shed
water
instead of sponging it up.
I have used them in the soffit of my garden shed where they remain dry and
they
look terrific just oiled.


Rot is rot and it will continue. You can coat it, you can make it look
pretty, but you won't stop it unless you cut it out. The only question is
if the labor is worth the efforts on rotted wood to prolong in a few more
months, maybe a couple of years.



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Old December 4th 04, 08:57 PM
George
 
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Well, not really. If the boards are installed vertically, it's doubtful
they'll ever exceed the ~20% MC required for active fungal growth for any
length of time. "Pecky" cedar was a staple out on the left coast. Second
fence I put up at a house I owned - first went down in a helluva storm - was
still there twenty-five years later when I paid a visit..

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
. com...

"Gino" wrote in message

I have access to cedar boards full 1"x6" that sat too long and rotted in
the
middle. Run through the planer they have a beautiful lacy look.
I love the way they look and they are still plenty strong on the edges.
But because they have started to rot they absorb water like a sponge.
I would like to use them as a garden fence but I doubt they would last
long.
Is there any reasonably priced UV sealer that might help these boards

shed
water
instead of sponging it up.
I have used them in the soffit of my garden shed where they remain dry

and
they
look terrific just oiled.


Rot is rot and it will continue. You can coat it, you can make it look
pretty, but you won't stop it unless you cut it out. The only question is
if the labor is worth the efforts on rotted wood to prolong in a few more
months, maybe a couple of years.




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Old December 4th 04, 09:12 PM
Gino
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 4 Dec 2004 15:57:35 -0500, "George" [email protected] wrote:

Well, not really. If the boards are installed vertically, it's doubtful
they'll ever exceed the ~20% MC required for active fungal growth for any
length of time. "Pecky" cedar was a staple out on the left coast. Second
fence I put up at a house I owned - first went down in a helluva storm - was
still there twenty-five years later when I paid a visit..

Would a splash of UV protected Thompson Water seal help protect them and
maintain the color.
I can always unscrew them a run them back through the planer in a year or two.
I did this with another fence using old planer blades to just remove the grey
and it worked pretty good and took very little time (except the staple removal).
Made the old fence look like new. A few warped boards were a problem but most
were great.

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
.com...

"Gino" wrote in message

I have access to cedar boards full 1"x6" that sat too long and rotted in
the
middle. Run through the planer they have a beautiful lacy look.
I love the way they look and they are still plenty strong on the edges.
But because they have started to rot they absorb water like a sponge.
I would like to use them as a garden fence but I doubt they would last
long.
Is there any reasonably priced UV sealer that might help these boards

shed
water
instead of sponging it up.
I have used them in the soffit of my garden shed where they remain dry

and
they
look terrific just oiled.


Rot is rot and it will continue. You can coat it, you can make it look
pretty, but you won't stop it unless you cut it out. The only question is
if the labor is worth the efforts on rotted wood to prolong in a few more
months, maybe a couple of years.




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Old December 4th 04, 10:13 PM
George
 
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Default

Vibrating them through your planer will shake out a lot of interior
substance. My fence boards were bare, as they should be. I wouldn't waste
my time with anything else, if it were me.

"Gino" wrote in message
...
Would a splash of UV protected Thompson Water seal help protect them and
maintain the color.
I can always unscrew them a run them back through the planer in a year or

two.
I did this with another fence using old planer blades to just remove the

grey
and it worked pretty good and took very little time (except the staple

removal).
Made the old fence look like new. A few warped boards were a problem but

most
were great.





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