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  #31   Report Post  
Old July 18th 20, 07:00 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default What's your game changer?

On Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 12:35:18 PM UTC-5, Bob D wrote:
On Sunday, July 12, 2020 at 9:05:51 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
Bob D wrote in
:
This may be an old topic but I am too lazy to search for it.

Do you have an item that has been a game changer for you in pursuit of
woodworking excellence. It can be something you purchased or built or
found in the trash. It can cost anywhere from free to $1000's. Please
refrain from value judgement comments like "too expensive; not worth
it; etc". To someone its worth it. I am just looking for inspiration
and ideas. Please expand on how or what you accomplished that caused
you to say "Wow, this is a real game changer".

I will start it off with some game changers for me.

1. self centering drill bit - I was trying to mount a piano hinge and
each screw seemed to try to pull it out of alignment. I bought the bit
and re-drilled all the holes. the installation was perfectly aligned
and all the screws centered and flush. 2. Sawstop industrial saw - I
cannot even begin to express the magic of a great tablesaw. 3. Festool
RO sander with dust extractor - sanding without dust. I didn't even
know this was possible. Prompted by Leon "Bob, you gotta buy one of
these" 4. Veritas saddle square - easy transfer of marks around the
sides of a piece.

Bob

I have a grinder tool rest that clamps the tool in place then you can
slide it along the rest. This produces a very consistent hollow ground
edge. A few passes on a stone and you get an edge that's sharp and easy
to take care of.

The Work Sharp is very nice, but some good stones and the grinder tool
rest (and grinder, of course) is what I'd invest in if I was starting
over.

Puckdropper

I think I have one of those tool rests (made by Veritas). I used it with a hand turned grinder for sharpening and it worked well, but I got tired of turning the crank and manipulating the blade to be sharpened. I've thought about getting a Jet variable frequency control grinder. What kind of grinder are you using with your setup? My current 3600 RPM grinder is too fast for sharpening. I have a worksharp but its painstakingly slow for initial shaping of a blade.

Bob


I cut out and glued a 60 grit piece of sandpaper to a Work Sharp glass wheel. That works pretty quickly on a dull chisel.

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Old July 18th 20, 08:25 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default What's your game changer?

On 7/18/2020 12:23 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Sunday, July 12, 2020 at 4:19:27 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

....

Somewhat parallel, but since am older than most redwoods, the Powermatic
Model 66...every bit the saw of SS in mass, balance, etc., but w/o the
then 35 year in the future safety features.

....

I am in full agreement with your view of the PM66. The sawstop
industrial saw was the closest i could get to a pm66 with sawstop
safety features.


Be interesting if anybody else starts pushing the envelope on the
expiring patents over next few years...surprised weren't more efforts
than have been for workarounds...

Of course, everything else now off-shore w/ no margins for R&D doesn't
lend to more than minimal product evolution rather than real innovation.

I picked mine up at the factory in McMinnville, TN, back when were still
in full-swing production. Some of the piles of rough castings in the
back yard were 15-20 ft tall "seasoning" before final milling operations.

Now, last I looked, it's all bare, vacant industrial property; all the
buildings had been razed.

--



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Old July 18th 20, 10:30 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default What's your game changer?

On 7/18/2020 2:25 PM, dpb wrote:
On 7/18/2020 12:23 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Sunday, July 12, 2020 at 4:19:27 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

...

Somewhat parallel, but since am older than most redwoods, the Powermatic
Model 66...every bit the saw of SS in mass, balance, etc., but w/o the
then 35 year in the future safety features.

...

I am in full agreement with your view of the PM66.¬*¬* The sawstop
industrial saw was the closest i could get to a pm66 with sawstop
safety features.


Be interesting if anybody else starts pushing the envelope on the
expiring patents over next few years...surprised weren't more efforts
than have been for workarounds...


They would have to build a quality saw to compete with SS. I can see
Powermatic doing that but no other American brands.


Of course, everything else now off-shore w/ no margins for R&D doesn't
lend to more than minimal product evolution rather than real innovation.


LOL Well I responded above before reading this. Totally agree.



  #34   Report Post  
Old July 18th 20, 10:34 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default What's your game changer?

On 7/18/2020 12:35 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Sunday, July 12, 2020 at 9:05:51 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
Bob D wrote in
:
This may be an old topic but I am too lazy to search for it.

Do you have an item that has been a game changer for you in pursuit of
woodworking excellence. It can be something you purchased or built or
found in the trash. It can cost anywhere from free to $1000's. Please
refrain from value judgement comments like "too expensive; not worth
it; etc". To someone its worth it. I am just looking for inspiration
and ideas. Please expand on how or what you accomplished that caused
you to say "Wow, this is a real game changer".

I will start it off with some game changers for me.

1. self centering drill bit - I was trying to mount a piano hinge and
each screw seemed to try to pull it out of alignment. I bought the bit
and re-drilled all the holes. the installation was perfectly aligned
and all the screws centered and flush. 2. Sawstop industrial saw - I
cannot even begin to express the magic of a great tablesaw. 3. Festool
RO sander with dust extractor - sanding without dust. I didn't even
know this was possible. Prompted by Leon "Bob, you gotta buy one of
these" 4. Veritas saddle square - easy transfer of marks around the
sides of a piece.

Bob

I have a grinder tool rest that clamps the tool in place then you can
slide it along the rest. This produces a very consistent hollow ground
edge. A few passes on a stone and you get an edge that's sharp and easy
to take care of.

The Work Sharp is very nice, but some good stones and the grinder tool
rest (and grinder, of course) is what I'd invest in if I was starting
over.

Puckdropper

I think I have one of those tool rests (made by Veritas). I used it with a hand turned grinder for sharpening and it worked well, but I got tired of turning the crank and manipulating the blade to be sharpened. I've thought about getting a Jet variable frequency control grinder. What kind of grinder are you using with your setup? My current 3600 RPM grinder is too fast for sharpening. I have a worksharp but its painstakingly slow for initial shaping of a blade.

Bob

Bob you might want to change to new paper and or a more coarse grit. I
have the Work Sharp and it is pretty fast for me.

FWIW I also have the Ken Onion WorkSharp knife sharpener. That works
extremely well until the belt dulls. I did not realize my belt was
dull until it broke and I replaced it with same but new. WOW that cut
so much faster. LOL
  #35   Report Post  
Old July 19th 20, 01:05 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default What's your game changer?

On Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 4:34:27 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 7/18/2020 12:35 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Sunday, July 12, 2020 at 9:05:51 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
Bob D wrote in
:
This may be an old topic but I am too lazy to search for it.

Do you have an item that has been a game changer for you in pursuit of
woodworking excellence. It can be something you purchased or built or
found in the trash. It can cost anywhere from free to $1000's. Please
refrain from value judgement comments like "too expensive; not worth
it; etc". To someone its worth it. I am just looking for inspiration
and ideas. Please expand on how or what you accomplished that caused
you to say "Wow, this is a real game changer".

I will start it off with some game changers for me.

1. self centering drill bit - I was trying to mount a piano hinge and
each screw seemed to try to pull it out of alignment. I bought the bit
and re-drilled all the holes. the installation was perfectly aligned
and all the screws centered and flush. 2. Sawstop industrial saw - I
cannot even begin to express the magic of a great tablesaw. 3. Festool
RO sander with dust extractor - sanding without dust. I didn't even
know this was possible. Prompted by Leon "Bob, you gotta buy one of
these" 4. Veritas saddle square - easy transfer of marks around the
sides of a piece.

Bob
I have a grinder tool rest that clamps the tool in place then you can
slide it along the rest. This produces a very consistent hollow ground
edge. A few passes on a stone and you get an edge that's sharp and easy
to take care of.

The Work Sharp is very nice, but some good stones and the grinder tool
rest (and grinder, of course) is what I'd invest in if I was starting
over.

Puckdropper

I think I have one of those tool rests (made by Veritas). I used it with a hand turned grinder for sharpening and it worked well, but I got tired of turning the crank and manipulating the blade to be sharpened. I've thought about getting a Jet variable frequency control grinder. What kind of grinder are you using with your setup? My current 3600 RPM grinder is too fast for sharpening. I have a worksharp but its painstakingly slow for initial shaping of a blade.

Bob

Bob you might want to change to new paper and or a more coarse grit. I
have the Work Sharp and it is pretty fast for me.

FWIW I also have the Ken Onion WorkSharp knife sharpener. That works
extremely well until the belt dulls. I did not realize my belt was
dull until it broke and I replaced it with same but new. WOW that cut
so much faster. LOL


I bought the coarse grit kit for the worksharp. It was better. It still is awfully slow for something like changing angle from 30 deg to 25 deg.

Changing shapes is something that doesn't happen often. There is also the need to repair a blade if you happen to run into a hidden nail. I find a lot of my tools just languish because I don't want to spend a couple of hours reshaping blades. I guess if I had a sharpening station set up full time, it would be easier.

Maybe I'll break out that old hand cranked grinder.


  #36   Report Post  
Old July 19th 20, 03:38 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 871
Default What's your game changer?

Bob D wrote in
:


I think I have one of those tool rests (made by Veritas). I used it
with a hand turned grinder for sharpening and it worked well, but I
got tired of turning the crank and manipulating the blade to be
sharpened. I've thought about getting a Jet variable frequency
control grinder. What kind of grinder are you using with your setup?
My current 3600 RPM grinder is too fast for sharpening. I have a
worksharp but its painstakingly slow for initial shaping of a blade.

Bob


I'm using a Performax 6". It's a 3600 RPM grinder. I put on Norton 3x
wheels that help it cut a little cooler. I also dip the tool frequently in
water, and try to do it before the tool gets hot. I dress the wheel any
time it feels like the cutting slows down.

If you're really trying to hog off metal, you'll want a belt grinder like
they use on Forged in Fire. The Harbor Freight 1x30 is ok, but remember
how much you paid for it...

Puckdropper
  #37   Report Post  
Old July 22nd 20, 01:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 735
Default What's your game changer?

"Eli the Bearded" wrote in message ...

I read _Craeft_ (Cræft) by Alexander Langlands last year. He attributes
the death / dying of true craft to the availability of power tools (not
just electron power, but anything more than human hand). Power removes
the connection between human and the material. He doesn't deny that
things can be made faster or well with power tools, but he does argue
that there is a loss of understanding of material that comes from the
mediating effect of just being able to apply more force faster.


I got thinking about this a bit and I'd have to say that discovering the
utility of the the card scraper is way up on the list of game changers for
me. Card scrapers are amazing tools... not only for smoothing difficult
grain but for tweaking surfaces at flush joints, removing finish, tweaking
the fitting of tool handles to heads, tweaking the faces of tenons, tweaking
surfaces that were created with spoke shaves, smoothing finishes, etc.... A
very simple tool that has a lot of utility.

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Old July 30th 20, 01:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 12
Default What's your game changer?

"Bob D" wrote in message
...

This may be an old topic but I am too lazy to search for it.

Do you have an item that has been a game changer for you in
pursuit of woodworking excellence. It can be something you
purchased or built or found in the trash. It can cost
anywhere from free to $1000's. Please refrain from value
judgement comments like "too expensive; not worth it; etc".
To someone its worth it. I am just looking for inspiration
and ideas. Please expand on how or what you accomplished
that caused you to say "Wow, this is a real game changer".

I will start it off with some game changers for me.

1. self centering drill bit - I was trying to mount a piano
hinge and each screw seemed to try to pull it out of
alignment. I bought the bit and re-drilled all the holes.
the installation was perfectly aligned and all the screws
centered and flush.
2. Sawstop industrial saw - I cannot even begin to express
the magic of a great tablesaw.
3. Festool RO sander with dust extractor - sanding without
dust. I didn't even know this was possible. Prompted by
Leon "Bob, you gotta buy one of these"
4. Veritas saddle square - easy transfer of marks around the
sides of a piece.

Bob

Sand-O-Flex. Now that I'm more of a woodturner than a
woodworker, I've often said I wouldn't turn most of what I
do if I didn't own one. Probably the only way to sand bark,
bark inclusions, voids, etc. I've had one since I used to
sell them in a hardware store I worked at in the 70's-80's.
I used it to debur routed edges when I did flat work, but
only rarely. Now I use one nearly every day.

Phil



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