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Old December 21st 18, 05:04 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 13,889
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the video,
but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.


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Old December 21st 18, 05:52 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,965
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.


The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

..
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

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Old December 21st 18, 06:06 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,889
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.


The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.


That was one of my issues also. In fact, on that model saw, the Torx screws
are also slotted. A narrow flat blade screw driver works just fine in the
deep handle hole.


I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.


The handle itself clamps the cord in 2 places.

1 - The hole formed by the 2 piece handle for the stress relief sleeve is
smaller than the sleeve itself.

2 - Interior from that, the handle pieces form another "hole" that has a
straight plastic bar across it. As long as you leave the outer insulation
on the cord, you basically need a clamp to close the handle before screwing
it back together. You could use the screws to pull it together but I don't
like putting that much stress on screws going into plastic.

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Old December 21st 18, 06:13 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,889
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.


The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn


BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.
  #5   Report Post  
Old December 21st 18, 07:24 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,965
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.


The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does
not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn


BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.


I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-tern fix was a green ground wite (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.


Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.

Joe Gwinn



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Old December 21st 18, 07:31 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 238
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does
not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn


BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.


I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-tern fix was a green ground wite (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.


Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.


The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin
with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.
  #7   Report Post  
Old December 21st 18, 07:56 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 1,784
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:31:34 -0500, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.


The "eylet" procedure he uses is not uncommon - but to do it ptoperly
he should solder the loop

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does
not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.


The full wire bent around the contact screw can often be too much - a
crimprd ting is best, the "split eye" soldered is next best.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.


WHich is what "I" prefer

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.


Correct - a bit of a "bodge"

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Correct. The original likely had an insulated netalclamp around the
cord. Or it was "bonded" into the strain releif (I've done it with
silicone sealer)
Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.


I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-tern fix was a green ground wite (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.



The green wire isn't an OSHA issue, per se, but that cap plug would
not pass. The saw came with a molded plug and most OSHA inspectors
won't pass a "repaired" cord of any type.

I know they don't like manually installed ends - male or female - on
extention cords. Used to repair damaged cords by making one cord into
2. Now I get those cords for home use because they are not allowed on
a job site. Lots of "good" cords are scrapped every year because they
cannot be "repaired"

Some inspectors may not be as "anal" as the ones around here -- -
Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.


The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin
with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.

  #8   Report Post  
Old December 21st 18, 10:48 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,965
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Dec 21, 2018, J. Clarke wrote
(in ):

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in t

e
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses



The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if
there is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. Thi


is bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and th


screw is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wi

e does
not squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that the terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, bu


this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I
don´t like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a ce

tain
manner (e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired diff

rently.

I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-term fix was a green ground wire (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job
site if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.


Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.


The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin
with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.


The fellow making the repair had made that repair some years earlier.

Joe Gwinn

  #9   Report Post  
Old December 21st 18, 10:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 238
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 16:48:36 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, J. Clarke wrote
(in ):

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in t

e
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses



The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if
there is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. Thi


is bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and th


screw is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wi

e does
not squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that the terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, bu


this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I
don´t like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a ce

tain
manner (e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired diff

rently.

I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-term fix was a green ground wire (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job
site if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.

Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.


The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin
with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.


The fellow making the repair had made that repair some years earlier.


Not the _plug_, the _cord_. He did not say that he had replaced the
_cord_ earlier, or if he did I missed it.
  #10   Report Post  
Old December 22nd 18, 03:06 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 1,784
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:56:57 -0500, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:31:34 -0500, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn
wrote:

On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to
replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring
connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.


The "eylet" procedure he uses is not uncommon - but to do it ptoperly
he should solder the loop

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in
ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does
not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.


The full wire bent around the contact screw can often be too much - a
crimprd ting is best, the "split eye" soldered is next best.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.


WHich is what "I" prefer

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while
being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the
plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.


Correct - a bit of a "bodge"

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Correct. The original likely had an insulated netalclamp around the
cord. Or it was "bonded" into the strain releif (I've done it with
silicone sealer)
Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.

I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But
double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.

My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to
leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The
short-tern fix was a green ground wite (with ring terminals at both ends)
from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I
discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.

But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy,
and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green
terminal for it.

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.


The green wire isn't an OSHA issue, per se, but that cap plug would
not pass. The saw came with a molded plug and most OSHA inspectors
won't pass a "repaired" cord of any type.

I know they don't like manually installed ends - male or female - on
extention cords. Used to repair damaged cords by making one cord into
2. Now I get those cords for home use because they are not allowed on
a job site. Lots of "good" cords are scrapped every year because they
cannot be "repaired"

Some inspectors may not be as "anal" as the ones around here -- -
Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today.
Double-insulated is still OK by UL.


The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin
with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.

Reading my reply I guess I should proofread my replies -fat finger
syndrome hit again


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