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  #61   Report Post  
Old December 28th 18, 02:18 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,137
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On 12/27/2018 11:06 AM, wrote:
On Thu, 27 Dec 2018 09:06:18 -0500, Jack wrote:

On 12/23/2018 9:18 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 16:51:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, December 23, 2018 at 7:11:04 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 07:42:42 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 11:12:14 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 08:48:35 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 10:38:15 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 04:56:43 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 12:27:23 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 09:13:14 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.

+1

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.

Years back, one of our techs was required by industrial safety to add
a 3-prong cordset to a plastic wall clock. I asked what he did with
the green wire. "Connected it to the case, of course." The inspector
was happy.

That's what happens when they hire safety personnel with no actual safety knowledge just so
that they can check the "Hired Safety Personnel" box.

Or when people are told to follow the rules, rather than understand
the rules. BTW, this was in IBM.

I used to work at a huge manufacturing/chemical plant. "Safety First" posters
everywhere. Every department had a designated safety officer(s). Cash awards
were given if a someone pointed out a safety issue.

As an IT tech I used to go everywhere within the plant. I won numerous
cash awards for pointing out safety issues but only after I had to convince
the safety officer of that department that it was an issue. Sometimes I
had to escalate the issue because the safety officer just didn't get the
point. The lack of common sense was really scary.

That's another good one. They wouldn't pay engineers for safety, or
other suggestions but they would pay hourly staff. I'd just point out
problems to my technician and he'd collect the easy money. Often it
was stupid things like a sign blocking an Exit sign, and such. The
safety people would get ****ed-off because they were supposed to catch
such things.

This suggestion wasn't specifically a safety issue, but I got paid on it
through the corporate Suggestion System that paid for suggestions that resulted
in a money saving process change.

Same deal for "improvement" suggestions. Engineers needed not apply,
so I just gave the ideas to my technician(s). I wasn't going to get
paid for them so why not reward the guys doing my work for me. ;-)

My company was already in trouble for possible ground contamination in the
surrounding neighborhood - including the ground under the grade school
that was named for the company. One morning I was walking from the parking
to the security gate, a walk that took me down a public street along the
plant's fence. As I looked through the fence and down a road between 2
buildings, I saw foam bubbling up out of a sewer, breaking up into pieces
2-3 feet across and blowing down the road. Some of the bubble masses were
settling right up against the fence. Definitely not a good look for a company
already in trouble with the EPA.

Ouch! That's a real bad look, even if it was Lucy's washing machine.
We had loads of groundwater pollution (no matter what people thought,
electronics is a very dirty business), cost millions, but I never got
involved in that stuff.

I had a friend who was in management for that part of the plant so I called
him and asked him how I should report it. He told me that he would contact
the proper department. He then called me a few days later and told me to
put in a suggestion saying that the ABC department should be using anti-foaming
agent in the XYZ discharge system. He told me to route the suggestion through
his department. When I wrote up the suggestion, I added a few words about the
"bad look, especially at this time". About a month later I got a check for $3K.
That would be about $6.5K in today's dollars.

Apparently that "bad look" was worth preventing.

Very cool! I'd think so! I remember one suggestion (*not* mine) that
was turned down at least three times before paying out almost $100K
(in the '70s). Turns out the person who reviewed suggestions was the
person who was responsible for that particular area. He didn't want
to admit that he'd missed that sort of savings. These programs are
good ideas but it has to be run right or they turn into jokes.

The worst one I got hit with was a suggestion that was probably worth a $50K
award (mid-80's) To keep it simple, let's call it a software modification.

It would have saved an awful lot of money over time but the department said
that they couldn't afford the cost of the upgrade. (short term thinking, which
is what eventually put the company essentially out of business. Hint: Perhaps
you remember a time before we all took pictures with cell phones?) Anyway,
they thanked me for the suggestion but said they were not going to implement
it.

3 years later that same department did a major upgrade and when it was done
it looked exactly like what I had suggested. I contacted the suggestion
department and they said that they would re-open the suggestion and send it
back to the department to see if it warranted payment. The answer was "Yes,
we did basically implement what he suggested, but it wasn't done because of
his suggestion. An engineer within the department came up with the idea on
his own, as part of job his responsibilities.

So, I, an IT hardware technician who didn't even work for the department (they
were one of my "internal customers") made a suggestion 3 years before one of
their internal engineers (supposedly) came up with the same idea. At that time
they had the money, so they implemented his *free* suggestion, not mine.

I was not a happy camper for quite a while.

Yep, like many such programs, if they're not going to be faithful to
the intent of the program the incentive is often the opposite of what
is desired. That's why I don't bother with any of the morale
enhancement programs, wherever I've worked. They always end up doing
the opposite, eventually.

The HR department where I work now manages to do it right (wrong) out
of the chute. They have a "high-five" award, where you can give a
co-worker an award for helping you, or whatever. Build points and
exchange them for trinkets. I looked - nothing I want for anything
like what could be reasonably put together in a few years.

Then they screwed the pooch further by making it mandatory or *you*
get dinged on your performance.

They're also trying to motivate us to exercise, so give above points
for exercise, except that you have to link your smart watch (or
whatever) to their site. No thanks. They want groups to get together
to do a million steps. Hell, I do a million a month, myself, but I'm
not about to give them access to that information. I have had a bunch
of people ask me to join their groups, though. ;-)

Then there is the "How are we feeling today , children?", weekly
morale survey.

"Come on, people, this is a job and we get paid well to do what we do
and get treated pretty well in the mean time. Isn't that enough?"
Yeah, such BS really turns me off.

What turns me off is people too freakin' lazy (or dumb, or ignorant) to
trim 6 pages of non-relevant crap to get to their point.


What ****es me off a whiney asshole Usenet trolls.

--1

--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
http://jbstein.com

  #62   Report Post  
Old December 29th 18, 01:22 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2011
Posts: 11,282
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On 12/28/2018 7:17 AM, Jack wrote:
On 12/27/2018 10:55 AM, Leon wrote:
On 12/27/2018 8:06 AM, Jack wrote:


"Come on, people, this is a job and we get paid well to do what we do
and get treated pretty well in the mean time.* Isn't that enough?"
Yeah, such BS really turns me off.

What turns me off is people too freakin' lazy (or dumb, or ignorant)
to trim 6 pages of non-relevant crap to get to their point.


Took me 7 pages to get to your comment.* ;~)


Duh! Fight fire with fire!

I was tempted to simply quote 7 pages and simply add a ++1 or --1 which
I've seen done numerous times by lazy, inconsiderate morons.



;~) I got a kick out of your comment. I just had to say something. LOL.
  #63   Report Post  
Old December 29th 18, 05:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,723
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 08:18:05 -0500, Jack wrote:

On 12/27/2018 11:06 AM, wrote:
On Thu, 27 Dec 2018 09:06:18 -0500, Jack wrote:

On 12/23/2018 9:18 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 16:51:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, December 23, 2018 at 7:11:04 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 07:42:42 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 11:12:14 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 08:48:35 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 10:38:15 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 04:56:43 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 12:27:23 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 09:13:14 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.

+1

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.

Years back, one of our techs was required by industrial safety to add
a 3-prong cordset to a plastic wall clock. I asked what he did with
the green wire. "Connected it to the case, of course." The inspector
was happy.

That's what happens when they hire safety personnel with no actual safety knowledge just so
that they can check the "Hired Safety Personnel" box.

Or when people are told to follow the rules, rather than understand
the rules. BTW, this was in IBM.

I used to work at a huge manufacturing/chemical plant. "Safety First" posters
everywhere. Every department had a designated safety officer(s). Cash awards
were given if a someone pointed out a safety issue.

As an IT tech I used to go everywhere within the plant. I won numerous
cash awards for pointing out safety issues but only after I had to convince
the safety officer of that department that it was an issue. Sometimes I
had to escalate the issue because the safety officer just didn't get the
point. The lack of common sense was really scary.

That's another good one. They wouldn't pay engineers for safety, or
other suggestions but they would pay hourly staff. I'd just point out
problems to my technician and he'd collect the easy money. Often it
was stupid things like a sign blocking an Exit sign, and such. The
safety people would get ****ed-off because they were supposed to catch
such things.

This suggestion wasn't specifically a safety issue, but I got paid on it
through the corporate Suggestion System that paid for suggestions that resulted
in a money saving process change.

Same deal for "improvement" suggestions. Engineers needed not apply,
so I just gave the ideas to my technician(s). I wasn't going to get
paid for them so why not reward the guys doing my work for me. ;-)

My company was already in trouble for possible ground contamination in the
surrounding neighborhood - including the ground under the grade school
that was named for the company. One morning I was walking from the parking
to the security gate, a walk that took me down a public street along the
plant's fence. As I looked through the fence and down a road between 2
buildings, I saw foam bubbling up out of a sewer, breaking up into pieces
2-3 feet across and blowing down the road. Some of the bubble masses were
settling right up against the fence. Definitely not a good look for a company
already in trouble with the EPA.

Ouch! That's a real bad look, even if it was Lucy's washing machine.
We had loads of groundwater pollution (no matter what people thought,
electronics is a very dirty business), cost millions, but I never got
involved in that stuff.

I had a friend who was in management for that part of the plant so I called
him and asked him how I should report it. He told me that he would contact
the proper department. He then called me a few days later and told me to
put in a suggestion saying that the ABC department should be using anti-foaming
agent in the XYZ discharge system. He told me to route the suggestion through
his department. When I wrote up the suggestion, I added a few words about the
"bad look, especially at this time". About a month later I got a check for $3K.
That would be about $6.5K in today's dollars.

Apparently that "bad look" was worth preventing.

Very cool! I'd think so! I remember one suggestion (*not* mine) that
was turned down at least three times before paying out almost $100K
(in the '70s). Turns out the person who reviewed suggestions was the
person who was responsible for that particular area. He didn't want
to admit that he'd missed that sort of savings. These programs are
good ideas but it has to be run right or they turn into jokes.

The worst one I got hit with was a suggestion that was probably worth a $50K
award (mid-80's) To keep it simple, let's call it a software modification.

It would have saved an awful lot of money over time but the department said
that they couldn't afford the cost of the upgrade. (short term thinking, which
is what eventually put the company essentially out of business. Hint: Perhaps
you remember a time before we all took pictures with cell phones?) Anyway,
they thanked me for the suggestion but said they were not going to implement
it.

3 years later that same department did a major upgrade and when it was done
it looked exactly like what I had suggested. I contacted the suggestion
department and they said that they would re-open the suggestion and send it
back to the department to see if it warranted payment. The answer was "Yes,
we did basically implement what he suggested, but it wasn't done because of
his suggestion. An engineer within the department came up with the idea on
his own, as part of job his responsibilities.

So, I, an IT hardware technician who didn't even work for the department (they
were one of my "internal customers") made a suggestion 3 years before one of
their internal engineers (supposedly) came up with the same idea. At that time
they had the money, so they implemented his *free* suggestion, not mine.

I was not a happy camper for quite a while.

Yep, like many such programs, if they're not going to be faithful to
the intent of the program the incentive is often the opposite of what
is desired. That's why I don't bother with any of the morale
enhancement programs, wherever I've worked. They always end up doing
the opposite, eventually.

The HR department where I work now manages to do it right (wrong) out
of the chute. They have a "high-five" award, where you can give a
co-worker an award for helping you, or whatever. Build points and
exchange them for trinkets. I looked - nothing I want for anything
like what could be reasonably put together in a few years.

Then they screwed the pooch further by making it mandatory or *you*
get dinged on your performance.

They're also trying to motivate us to exercise, so give above points
for exercise, except that you have to link your smart watch (or
whatever) to their site. No thanks. They want groups to get together
to do a million steps. Hell, I do a million a month, myself, but I'm
not about to give them access to that information. I have had a bunch
of people ask me to join their groups, though. ;-)

Then there is the "How are we feeling today , children?", weekly
morale survey.

"Come on, people, this is a job and we get paid well to do what we do
and get treated pretty well in the mean time. Isn't that enough?"
Yeah, such BS really turns me off.

What turns me off is people too freakin' lazy (or dumb, or ignorant) to
trim 6 pages of non-relevant crap to get to their point.


What ****es me off a whiney asshole Usenet trolls.

--1


-(-1) == +1

You're such a nice guy. Thank you!
  #64   Report Post  
Old December 30th 18, 03:26 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,137
Default Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

On 12/28/2018 11:55 PM, wrote:
On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 08:18:05 -0500, Jack wrote:

On 12/27/2018 11:06 AM,
wrote:
On Thu, 27 Dec 2018 09:06:18 -0500, Jack wrote:

On 12/23/2018 9:18 PM,
wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 16:51:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, December 23, 2018 at 7:11:04 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 23 Dec 2018 07:42:42 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 11:12:14 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 08:48:35 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 10:38:15 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 04:56:43 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 12:27:23 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 09:13:14 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:
On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote
(in ):

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace
the power cord on a circular saw.

If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector"
from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61e5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the
video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there
is space -- which looks questionable in this case.

In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the
stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages,
and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.

Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the
bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is
bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw
is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not
squeeze out from under the terminal screw.

One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the
copper wire to solidify the ring.

The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being
tightened.

.
I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic
handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.

I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but
this area is critical.

Joe Gwinn

BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the
ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't
hurt".

I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I don't
like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain manner
(e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.

+1

I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job site
if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.

Years back, one of our techs was required by industrial safety to add
a 3-prong cordset to a plastic wall clock. I asked what he did with
the green wire. "Connected it to the case, of course." The inspector
was happy.

That's what happens when they hire safety personnel with no actual safety knowledge just so
that they can check the "Hired Safety Personnel" box.

Or when people are told to follow the rules, rather than understand
the rules. BTW, this was in IBM.

I used to work at a huge manufacturing/chemical plant. "Safety First" posters
everywhere. Every department had a designated safety officer(s). Cash awards
were given if a someone pointed out a safety issue.

As an IT tech I used to go everywhere within the plant. I won numerous
cash awards for pointing out safety issues but only after I had to convince
the safety officer of that department that it was an issue. Sometimes I
had to escalate the issue because the safety officer just didn't get the
point. The lack of common sense was really scary.

That's another good one. They wouldn't pay engineers for safety, or
other suggestions but they would pay hourly staff. I'd just point out
problems to my technician and he'd collect the easy money. Often it
was stupid things like a sign blocking an Exit sign, and such. The
safety people would get ****ed-off because they were supposed to catch
such things.

This suggestion wasn't specifically a safety issue, but I got paid on it
through the corporate Suggestion System that paid for suggestions that resulted
in a money saving process change.

Same deal for "improvement" suggestions. Engineers needed not apply,
so I just gave the ideas to my technician(s). I wasn't going to get
paid for them so why not reward the guys doing my work for me. ;-)

My company was already in trouble for possible ground contamination in the
surrounding neighborhood - including the ground under the grade school
that was named for the company. One morning I was walking from the parking
to the security gate, a walk that took me down a public street along the
plant's fence. As I looked through the fence and down a road between 2
buildings, I saw foam bubbling up out of a sewer, breaking up into pieces
2-3 feet across and blowing down the road. Some of the bubble masses were
settling right up against the fence. Definitely not a good look for a company
already in trouble with the EPA.

Ouch! That's a real bad look, even if it was Lucy's washing machine.
We had loads of groundwater pollution (no matter what people thought,
electronics is a very dirty business), cost millions, but I never got
involved in that stuff.

I had a friend who was in management for that part of the plant so I called
him and asked him how I should report it. He told me that he would contact
the proper department. He then called me a few days later and told me to
put in a suggestion saying that the ABC department should be using anti-foaming
agent in the XYZ discharge system. He told me to route the suggestion through
his department. When I wrote up the suggestion, I added a few words about the
"bad look, especially at this time". About a month later I got a check for $3K.
That would be about $6.5K in today's dollars.

Apparently that "bad look" was worth preventing.

Very cool! I'd think so! I remember one suggestion (*not* mine) that
was turned down at least three times before paying out almost $100K
(in the '70s). Turns out the person who reviewed suggestions was the
person who was responsible for that particular area. He didn't want
to admit that he'd missed that sort of savings. These programs are
good ideas but it has to be run right or they turn into jokes.

The worst one I got hit with was a suggestion that was probably worth a $50K
award (mid-80's) To keep it simple, let's call it a software modification.

It would have saved an awful lot of money over time but the department said
that they couldn't afford the cost of the upgrade. (short term thinking, which
is what eventually put the company essentially out of business. Hint: Perhaps
you remember a time before we all took pictures with cell phones?) Anyway,
they thanked me for the suggestion but said they were not going to implement
it.

3 years later that same department did a major upgrade and when it was done
it looked exactly like what I had suggested. I contacted the suggestion
department and they said that they would re-open the suggestion and send it
back to the department to see if it warranted payment. The answer was "Yes,
we did basically implement what he suggested, but it wasn't done because of
his suggestion. An engineer within the department came up with the idea on
his own, as part of job his responsibilities.

So, I, an IT hardware technician who didn't even work for the department (they
were one of my "internal customers") made a suggestion 3 years before one of
their internal engineers (supposedly) came up with the same idea. At that time
they had the money, so they implemented his *free* suggestion, not mine.

I was not a happy camper for quite a while.

Yep, like many such programs, if they're not going to be faithful to
the intent of the program the incentive is often the opposite of what
is desired. That's why I don't bother with any of the morale
enhancement programs, wherever I've worked. They always end up doing
the opposite, eventually.

The HR department where I work now manages to do it right (wrong) out
of the chute. They have a "high-five" award, where you can give a
co-worker an award for helping you, or whatever. Build points and
exchange them for trinkets. I looked - nothing I want for anything
like what could be reasonably put together in a few years.

Then they screwed the pooch further by making it mandatory or *you*
get dinged on your performance.

They're also trying to motivate us to exercise, so give above points
for exercise, except that you have to link your smart watch (or
whatever) to their site. No thanks. They want groups to get together
to do a million steps. Hell, I do a million a month, myself, but I'm
not about to give them access to that information. I have had a bunch
of people ask me to join their groups, though. ;-)

Then there is the "How are we feeling today , children?", weekly
morale survey.

"Come on, people, this is a job and we get paid well to do what we do
and get treated pretty well in the mean time. Isn't that enough?"
Yeah, such BS really turns me off.

What turns me off is people too freakin' lazy (or dumb, or ignorant) to
trim 6 pages of non-relevant crap to get to their point.

What ****es me off a whiney asshole Usenet trolls.

--1


-(-1) == +1

You're such a nice guy. Thank you!

Yer welcome

--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
http://jbstein.com


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