Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old January 13th 18, 01:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,275
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On Friday, January 12, 2018 at 3:24:15 PM UTC-6, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

I have never used this jig, but when I did my usual Amazon assessment by
reading thr one-star reviews, then too-star, and so on.

Joe Gwinn


I am glad you pointed that out. When a product only has 3% one star reviews, and 3% 2 star reviews, I just glance a them.

After reading you post I went to them and read all the reviews. It seems that at least most want a hard use, professionally engineered, metal jig with hardened drill inserts and infinitely adjustable location controls made from metal to meet their standards. When WoodPeckers release their jigs to that standard (such as their doweling jig), they are in the $500 - $700 cost range, when available. For my buddy, I doubt he will do more than 6 doors on this project.

This is a $30 jig that includes the bit. Could there be improvements? Sure. Hit that price point? Doubtful. Will any jig make everyone happy? Nope. BTW, reading the 4 star reviews, on most reviews I wasn't sure why they gave it a 4 instead of a five as the reviewers seemed pleased. And one of the guys that gave it three stars said that the bit didn't hold up when using it in his router...!!

The salient points made by Leon and Mike are certainly the most pertinent. (Thanks, guys!)

I found that the cams have 1mm click stop movement. No reports of them not being adjustable enough to work well, except in one of the one star reviews where one cabinet maker declared that sometimes it all comes down to 1/2 millimeter for accuracy. From a plastic jig with a hand held drill? Yeah, right. If it comes down to 1/2 of one millimeter (0.019") to make your projects correct when using a hand held plastic jig, then you should be doing brain surgery, not making cabinets. So, I will check Leon's box.

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand, so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.

While I can't find anything I like better, my complaint would be different from both of those. It has a scales on it to enable you to measure every time for accuracy. For me, the key to a good jig is its repeatability. I don't like the fact that this jig requires a manual placement each time it is used to determine the offset from the top or bottom of the door. I think Kreg licensed this from someone that was making it as there are multiple producers of this jig. Many Chinese stores on Aliexpress have this jig and have had it for some time. The Chinese version looks almost exactly like the Kreg but it has stop pins on it to speed the indexing and placement and comes with the 1/16" drill bit. With two adjacent sides positively indexed, you should probably be able use just one clamp in operation, which isn't available on the Kreg.

If my buddy was a little more trusting of his skills, I would help him do what I did when these jigs were almost impossibly expensive and still didn't work. First, with a bunch pf doors to do, I used my bench drill press and a lucite marking jig from Woodcraft. Then, a 35mm bit and a stop collar. Done.

These days, if I had just a few to do I would make my jig out of 1x4, with indexes in where I wanted them, and using the 1x4 setup as a guide, drill down with a bit/stop collar setup. Yes, the jig would only be good for one size hinge from one manufacturer but would be quick to make and test. Sadly, he is still at the phase of his woodworking experience where he feels he needs exactly the right store bought tool for the job, so a two sided frame of 1x4 with a template centered in it would be too much for him to trust.

Thanks for the input!

Robert

  #12   Report Post  
Old January 13th 18, 02:37 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,611
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.


If my buddy was a little more trusting of his skills, I would help
him do what I did when these jigs were almost impossibly expensive
and still didn't work. First, with a bunch pf doors to do, I used
my bench drill press and a lucite marking jig from Woodcraft. Then,
a 35mm bit and a stop collar. Done.

These days, if I had just a few to do I would make my jig out of
1x4, with indexes in where I wanted them, and using the 1x4 setup as
a guide, drill down with a bit/stop collar setup. Yes, the jig would
only be good for one size hinge from one manufacturer but would be
quick to make and test. Sadly, he is still at the phase of his
woodworking experience where he feels he needs exactly the right
store bought tool for the job, so a two sided frame of 1x4 with a
template centered in it would be too much for him to trust.


If I had a woodworking school or taught it, after learning proper tool
use, I would spend the next sessions in teaching how to build 10 or 12
essential jigs. And I wouldn't show them any up front-- they'd have to
make their first attempts with their minds and intuition.

No building anything until they learned to build simple jigs.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com


  #13   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 03:21 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,704
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.


I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.

  #14   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 04:54 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,611
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/15/18 9:21 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.


I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.


Looking forward to the report.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com


  #15   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 07:05 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,275
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 9:21:15 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.


Like MIKE, I am too! Will be good to hear from a voice you can trust.

Robert


  #16   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 07:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,568
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:21:15 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.


I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.


Awaiting the report!

If possible, please include your opinion on longevity. I eventually will need
to install 40-ish hinges in doors made from 1 x poplar.

As Leon has mentioned, Kreg jigs typically look like a great idea, but don't
always live up to their (own) hype.
  #17   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 07:48 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,611
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/15/18 1:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:21:15 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.


I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.


Awaiting the report!

If possible, please include your opinion on longevity. I eventually will need
to install 40-ish hinges in doors made from 1 x poplar.

As Leon has mentioned, Kreg jigs typically look like a great idea, but don't
always live up to their (own) hype.


Do you have a drill press?
It goes pretty fast with a press and vac hose attached.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com


  #18   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 07:55 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,568
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 2:48:14 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
On 1/15/18 1:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:21:15 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.

I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.


Awaiting the report!

If possible, please include your opinion on longevity. I eventually will need
to install 40-ish hinges in doors made from 1 x poplar.

As Leon has mentioned, Kreg jigs typically look like a great idea, but don't
always live up to their (own) hype.


Do you have a drill press?
It goes pretty fast with a press and vac hose attached.



Yes, a bench-top DP, for which I made a 18" deep x 24" wide table for.

I'm sure it will work with a couple of stops attached, but I'm still
interested in the jig - as apparently are you. ;-)

  #19   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 08:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,611
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/15/18 1:55 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 2:48:14 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
On 1/15/18 1:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:21:15 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.

I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.

Awaiting the report!

If possible, please include your opinion on longevity. I eventually will need
to install 40-ish hinges in doors made from 1 x poplar.

As Leon has mentioned, Kreg jigs typically look like a great idea, but don't
always live up to their (own) hype.


Do you have a drill press?
It goes pretty fast with a press and vac hose attached.



Yes, a bench-top DP, for which I made a 18" deep x 24" wide table for.

I'm sure it will work with a couple of stops attached, but I'm still
interested in the jig - as apparently are you. ;-)


It would be nice to have in a toolbox in the van for just such an
occasion.
IF it's all it's cracked up to be.
I don't like jigs that make the job slower than I could do it without
the jig. :-)


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
www.mikedrums.com


  #20   Report Post  
Old January 15th 18, 08:46 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2011
Posts: 11,181
Default Anyone try the Kreg hinge jig?

On 1/15/2018 1:55 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 2:48:14 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:
On 1/15/18 1:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:21:15 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
-MIKE- writes:
On 1/12/18 7:25 PM, wrote:

So Mike, your observation seems to have some merit as a few folks
thought the forstner bits weren't sharp. This could be something, it
could be nothing. Forstner bits weren't meant to be used by hand,
so it's hard to get a good take on this one. On one hand I would
doubt that the home woodworker would know that drilling hard white
oak with this contraption by hand would be a bad idea, but on the
other Kreg doesn't provide any warning about drilling really hard
woods, small knots, or anything else. It also doesn't warn against
running your drill at high speed. I think I will meet with him to
check out the bit before he uses it if he gets the jig at WoodCraft.


I suspected that the bit might not be the best, but surly the thing can
cut 12 holes.
I just made a test cut in some rock maple with the bit I got from
Woodcraft.
The holes edges, cut by the pointed wings, were pristine. When it got
to the flat cutting edges for hogging, it slowed down a lot and stalled.
Of course, I may be going too fast. But also, all the edges on this
bit can be hand sharpened.

I have a couple of cabinet doors that need hinges, so I ordered the
Kreg jig, it arrived yesterday. I'll give it a try this
afternoon and report back. First impressions were that it
was definitely worth the price - the forstner bit looks well
made with nickers and full carbide cutters.

Awaiting the report!

If possible, please include your opinion on longevity. I eventually will need
to install 40-ish hinges in doors made from 1 x poplar.

As Leon has mentioned, Kreg jigs typically look like a great idea, but don't
always live up to their (own) hype.


Do you have a drill press?
It goes pretty fast with a press and vac hose attached.



Yes, a bench-top DP, for which I made a 18" deep x 24" wide table for.

I'm sure it will work with a couple of stops attached, but I'm still
interested in the jig - as apparently are you. ;-)



Just attach a fence to the DP and mark where the center of the hole will
be on the fence. Then align the mark on the door to the mark on the
fence and that is plenty good enough. No stops needed. I have cut
several hundred hinge holes this way.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kreg Jig Jig II: The pictorial definition of "Jury Rig" Greg Guarino[_2_] Woodworking 13 February 25th 13 07:58 PM
Field Expedient: Kreg Jig Jig Greg Guarino[_2_] Woodworking 11 February 20th 13 03:58 PM
FA: Kreg Jig # K2, Pocket Hole Jig, w/ 200 Face Frame Screws [email protected] Woodworking 0 January 3rd 06 01:31 AM
First day with Kreg Rocket Jig Pocket Hole System Mac Cool Woodworking 8 July 1st 04 02:29 PM
face frame...dowels or Kreg jig? Ted Woodworking 35 October 24th 03 10:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017