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  #131   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 11:41 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 10:24:07 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 09:17:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 12-Sep-17 6:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...

Don't focus so tightly on the container as it is. Look at it as it could
be: Windows, doors, plumbing, electricity can ALL be installed. ...


And by the time you do that w/ a box not intended for the purpose might
as well just have a purpose-built prefab -- oh, FEMA already did that.


I think the idea is that these intermodal containers could be shipped
where they're needed using existing infrastructure and *stored* until
needed. The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


Where would you store them? Considering we now know where they are needed, where
would you have stored them prior to Harvey and Irma.

Would enough containers have been delivered to Barbuda prior to Irma? The Keys? The
coastal areas around Houston - e.g. the small towns and villages, etc.?

Do you load up California in anticipation of the Big One? If so, where? Everywhere?

How do you determine where the next disaster will strike? How do keep them ready for use
when they may sit fior decades?



There's an outfit around here using them as the basis for tornado
shelters and folks use them all over as storage and occasionally
repurpose for small barns, etc., and yes, rarely for dwelling space but
they're simply not particularly well-suited for the purpose at hand.


For permanent homes, no, I don't think anyone is proposing that
they're a good idea.



  #132   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 02:20 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On 9/13/2017 5:25 AM, William Ahern wrote:


There's an outfit around here using them as the basis for tornado
shelters and folks use them all over as storage and occasionally
repurpose for small barns, etc., and yes, rarely for dwelling space but
they're simply not particularly well-suited for the purpose at hand.


For permanent homes, no, I don't think anyone is proposing that
they're a good idea.


Many architects seem enamored of them. Here's an interesting point (among
many) made by an architect pushing back against the fad:

An empty 40' shipping container weighs 8380 pounds. A galvanized steel
stud weighs a pound per linear foot. These two containers, melted down and
rolled and formed, could have been upcycled into 2,095 8' long steel
studs. Framing the walls instead of using shipping containers would have
used about 144 of them. Using shipping containers as structural elements
for a one storey building is downcycling and wasting of a resource.


According to this guy the container can be better used making 2095
studs. What is the total impact once those studs are made into walls
with drywall, nails, energy for recycling, etc.? Doubt he did the right
research before commenting

  #133   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 02:30 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On 9/13/2017 6:41 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 10:24:07 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 09:17:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 12-Sep-17 6:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...

Don't focus so tightly on the container as it is. Look at it as it could
be: Windows, doors, plumbing, electricity can ALL be installed. ...

And by the time you do that w/ a box not intended for the purpose might
as well just have a purpose-built prefab -- oh, FEMA already did that.


I think the idea is that these intermodal containers could be shipped
where they're needed using existing infrastructure and *stored* until
needed. The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


Where would you store them? Considering we now know where they are needed, where
would you have stored them prior to Harvey and Irma.

Would enough containers have been delivered to Barbuda prior to Irma? The Keys? The
coastal areas around Houston - e.g. the small towns and villages, etc.?

Do you load up California in anticipation of the Big One? If so, where? Everywhere?

How do you determine where the next disaster will strike? How do keep them ready for use
when they may sit fior decades?




It can have benefits. They can be stored in much less space than a FEMA
trailer since containers stack well. You can transport 12,000 of them
on a single ship. Of course, then you need the supporting
infrastructure to handle the ship, the loading/unloading and the
tractors to move them to final location. Trains can move them too, but
you still need the right equipment on the rails.

It is not a single solution to all housing needs but I can see it as a
benefit is some areas. Just one piece of a well planed pie.
  #134   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 06:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 03:41:56 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 10:24:07 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 09:17:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 12-Sep-17 6:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...

Don't focus so tightly on the container as it is. Look at it as it could
be: Windows, doors, plumbing, electricity can ALL be installed. ...

And by the time you do that w/ a box not intended for the purpose might
as well just have a purpose-built prefab -- oh, FEMA already did that.


I think the idea is that these intermodal containers could be shipped
where they're needed using existing infrastructure and *stored* until
needed. The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


Where would you store them? Considering we now know where they are needed, where
would you have stored them prior to Harvey and Irma.


There are one or two army bases in Florida, Georgia, and even Texas.

Would enough containers have been delivered to Barbuda prior to Irma? The Keys? The
coastal areas around Houston - e.g. the small towns and villages, etc.?


Is FEMA responsible for "Barbuda"? Can FEMA build trailers and have
them pre-placed around the Keys, Houston, small towns and villages,
*before* the hurricane hits? Good grief. THINK! Guess what
"intermodal" means.

Do you load up California in anticipation of the Big One? If so, where? Everywhere?


Hell, no. Store them in Antarctica where they'll be out of sight!
sheesh

How do you determine where the next disaster will strike? How do keep them ready for use
when they may sit fior decades?


That's why the steel shell makes sense. Drywall and termite barf that
FEMA used makes no sense at all.

It's not decades between emergencies, BTW.

There's an outfit around here using them as the basis for tornado
shelters and folks use them all over as storage and occasionally
repurpose for small barns, etc., and yes, rarely for dwelling space but
they're simply not particularly well-suited for the purpose at hand.


For permanent homes, no, I don't think anyone is proposing that
they're a good idea.

  #135   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 06:17 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 09:30:29 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 9/13/2017 6:41 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 10:24:07 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 09:17:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 12-Sep-17 6:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...

Don't focus so tightly on the container as it is. Look at it as it could
be: Windows, doors, plumbing, electricity can ALL be installed. ...

And by the time you do that w/ a box not intended for the purpose might
as well just have a purpose-built prefab -- oh, FEMA already did that.

I think the idea is that these intermodal containers could be shipped
where they're needed using existing infrastructure and *stored* until
needed. The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


Where would you store them? Considering we now know where they are needed, where
would you have stored them prior to Harvey and Irma.

Would enough containers have been delivered to Barbuda prior to Irma? The Keys? The
coastal areas around Houston - e.g. the small towns and villages, etc.?

Do you load up California in anticipation of the Big One? If so, where? Everywhere?

How do you determine where the next disaster will strike? How do keep them ready for use
when they may sit fior decades?




It can have benefits. They can be stored in much less space than a FEMA
trailer since containers stack well. You can transport 12,000 of them
on a single ship. Of course, then you need the supporting
infrastructure to handle the ship, the loading/unloading and the
tractors to move them to final location. Trains can move them too, but
you still need the right equipment on the rails.

It is not a single solution to all housing needs but I can see it as a
benefit is some areas. Just one piece of a well planed pie.


Exactly. Something that can be done _before_ it's needed.


  #136   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 06:30 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2015
Posts: 119
Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

They can stored in Guam, in such a way to either counterbalance the military masses, or just to balance their own weight so as to prevent the island from capsizing

On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 1:17:08 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 09:30:29 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 9/13/2017 6:41 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 10:24:07 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 09:17:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 12-Sep-17 6:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
...

Don't focus so tightly on the container as it is. Look at it as it could
be: Windows, doors, plumbing, electricity can ALL be installed. ...

And by the time you do that w/ a box not intended for the purpose might
as well just have a purpose-built prefab -- oh, FEMA already did that.

I think the idea is that these intermodal containers could be shipped
where they're needed using existing infrastructure and *stored* until
needed. The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.

Where would you store them? Considering we now know where they are needed, where
would you have stored them prior to Harvey and Irma.

Would enough containers have been delivered to Barbuda prior to Irma? The Keys? The
coastal areas around Houston - e.g. the small towns and villages, etc.?

Do you load up California in anticipation of the Big One? If so, where? Everywhere?

How do you determine where the next disaster will strike? How do keep them ready for use
when they may sit fior decades?




It can have benefits. They can be stored in much less space than a FEMA
trailer since containers stack well. You can transport 12,000 of them
on a single ship. Of course, then you need the supporting
infrastructure to handle the ship, the loading/unloading and the
tractors to move them to final location. Trains can move them too, but
you still need the right equipment on the rails.

It is not a single solution to all housing needs but I can see it as a
benefit is some areas. Just one piece of a well planed pie.


Exactly. Something that can be done _before_ it's needed.


  #137   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 08:08 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 734
Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 22:24:02 -0400, wrote:

The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


The people in Indiana who built most of them might disagree, the
stories of bad trailers are likely the one that got the most press. It
did pump money into Indiana to people who needed it.
  #140   Report Post  
Old September 14th 17, 11:58 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 36
Default The Houston Gang An update 8/30

wrote:
On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:08:53 -0500, Markem
wrote:

On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 22:24:02 -0400,
wrote:

The FEMA trailers made during Katrina weren't much good the
first time around.


The people in Indiana who built most of them might disagree, the
stories of bad trailers are likely the one that got the most press. It
did pump money into Indiana to people who needed it.


Broken windows are great for the economy. Too bad we don't have more
cat-4 hurricanes.

Downed trees are good for the local economy. All the bearded
backwoodsmen are swarming around in their pickups with a chainsaw and
a trailer. Let them make a little money off the storm, I say.

--
GW Ross









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