Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2016
Posts: 66
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

I would like to repair and reinforce a 1930's Lincoln double pedestal
office desk to use as a base for a metalworking lathe. The desk appears
to have been made by the Commercial Furniture Company of Chicago. It's
well-used but no wood is broken, however one mortise and tenon joint in
a leg has come apart.

It's not obvious to me how to disassemble it for repair, nor what adhesives
to use. Since it was mass-produced, I'm hopeful that somebody will know how
to get it apart without further damage. Web searches came up empty, so the
subject is obscure or I didn't use the right keywords.

One curious thing (to me) is that many of the plywood panels in drawer
bottoms and pedestal sides appear to be free-floating in their rabbets.
Seems that the desk would be much stronger if they were glued in place.
Did they just come loose over time?

The desk is nice enough that I don't want to butcher it, but since it was
sitting by the curb with a "free" tag on it it's unlikely to be a treasure
warranting museum treatment.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska





  #2   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 10,657
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

On 8/8/2017 8:25 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
I would like to repair and reinforce a 1930's Lincoln double pedestal
office desk to use as a base for a metalworking lathe.


The desk is nice enough that I don't want to butcher it, but since it was
sitting by the curb with a "free" tag on it it's unlikely to be a treasure
warranting museum treatment.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska


Why not post a couple of photos of it just in case? People have tossed
some real treasures due to lack of knowledge.

I don't think it would be my first choice for a lathe in any case.

  #3   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 04:11 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2016
Posts: 66
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Why not post a couple of photos of it just in case? People have tossed
some real treasures due to lack of knowledge.


Probably a good idea, it'll provide an opportunity to show the damage
as well. In the meantime I hope somebody chimes in with some guidance
on how it went together. It's rather surprising there isn't more info
on the Web, the Commercial Furniture Company was apparently a big deal
at one time.

I don't think it would be my first choice for a lathe in any case.

Mor is it mine, but it's an improvement over the existing bench.

Thanks for replying!

bob prohaska


  #4   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:07 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,358
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 7:30:07 PM UTC-5, bob prohaska wrote:

It's not obvious to me how to disassemble it for repair, nor what adhesives
to use.


The top should separate from the pedestals'assembly fairly easily. If there's not any fasteners readily visible on the exterior, then they are inside the carcass, inside the drawers. Probably metal fasteners, like "L" brackets.

Once the top is off, the two pedestals are held together by a spanning element (panel), between the two. Again, there is likely metal fasteners holding the spanning element to each pedestal.

If there is no visible fasteners, look closely for a screw site. The screw may be recessed, with a plug hiding the screw head. The spanning panel would likely have to be fairly thick, to have recessed screws, that way.

I think you would need to remove the top and probably the spanning panel, before you can properly access the damaged leg(s). I would think there is more than one M&T joint along each leg and, if one is disjointed, then the other has likely been compromised, as well.

The general design of almost every double pedestal desk is very similar. Rather than google Lincoln pedestal desk, try oak roll top desk. I highly suspect your desk is assembled, basically, the same way, in some similar fashion.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VpXtbgHXMg

Once your basic assembly is disassembled, then you can address the assembly (repair) of any individual part. If your desk is assembled differently, in some unique way, then maybe you have some special piece of furniture.

Yep, pics would definitely help.

Sonny
  #5   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:25 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,358
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

On Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 7:07:54 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 7:30:07 PM UTC-5, bob prohaska wrote:

It's not obvious to me how to disassemble it for repair, nor what adhesives
to use.


The top should separate from the pedestals'assembly fairly easily.


Maybe look for some top attachment as this assembly:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s18_azBhkP0

Sonny


  #6   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:42 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 188
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 7:30:07 PM UTC-5, bob prohaska wrote:
I would like to repair and reinforce a 1930's Lincoln double pedestal
office desk to use as a base for a metalworking lathe. The desk appears
to have been made by the Commercial Furniture Company of Chicago. It's
well-used but no wood is broken, however one mortise and tenon joint in
a leg has come apart.

It's not obvious to me how to disassemble it for repair, nor what adhesives
to use. Since it was mass-produced, I'm hopeful that somebody will know how
to get it apart without further damage. Web searches came up empty, so the
subject is obscure or I didn't use the right keywords.

One curious thing (to me) is that many of the plywood panels in drawer
bottoms and pedestal sides appear to be free-floating in their rabbets.
Seems that the desk would be much stronger if they were glued in place.
Did they just come loose over time?

The desk is nice enough that I don't want to butcher it, but since it was
sitting by the curb with a "free" tag on it it's unlikely to be a treasure
warranting museum treatment.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska


UNLESS you are intending to mount a mini-lathe forget it. On the joint, you will have to completely remove that stile, which means opening up the other joints. Given the age, a heat gun may well soften the glue in the joints enough to allow you to get the stile off. Depending on the condition of the original, offending, joint, you might want to consider two part epoxy for reassembly.
  #7   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:48 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,358
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 7:30:07 PM UTC-5, bob prohaska wrote:
I would like to repair and reinforce a 1930's Lincoln double pedestal
office desk to use as a base for a metalworking lathe.


A friend asked me to repair her oak roll top desk.... it's still in my shop.. One castor collapsed, so the support board had broken, detached. The whole desk is in horrible shape, not only after obviously having been racked, because of the broken castor unit, but the rest of the desk is filthy-dirty and the roll top (canvas attachment is dry-rotted, crumbling) is falling apart, completely. Initially, I was to repair the castor issue, only, but once I told her of other issues, she wanted me to do, what amounted to, a complete restoration. I told her "No way. Get a dedicated restorer to do it."

Considering how double pedestal desks are constructed, if your desk has a M&T joint issue, there may very likely be other issues with the desk. How might your desk have become damaged, that way (only one M&T joint?), as it has? I can't imagine it has only that one damage issue. There may very well likely be other issues with your desk. You better inspect it carefully, if you will use it for a metal lathe support.... or any lathe support.

Sonny
  #8   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 01:59 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,612
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

bob prohaska writes:

One curious thing (to me) is that many of the plywood panels in drawer
bottoms and pedestal sides appear to be free-floating in their rabbets.
Seems that the desk would be much stronger if they were glued in place.
Did they just come loose over time?


The panels are supposed to float because they expand and contract
with changes in humidity. If they were glued in place, they'd crack
or blow out the cope&stick mortices. Now generally, that only
applies to solid wood panels, but it doesn't hurt to leave plywood
panels floating.
  #9   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 05:38 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2016
Posts: 66
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk

Sonny wrote:

Yep, pics would definitely help.


Ok, I've put a few pictures at

http://www.zefox.net/~bob/lincolndesk/

There are metal clips, each with a single screw, under the edge of
the top at the juncture with the legs, plus two in the middle of the
ends. Evidently I should start by removing the screws to see if the
top will then lift off.

The damaged M&T joint is at the occupant's far right. I'd imagine it
was whacked on something while being moved. No other damage is apparent.

The lathe is an old South Bend 10K, about 300 lbs, with 48" bed. It
will span the pedestals nicely. The reinforcement plan is to mount
a false top, possibly a laminate countertop section, with the lathe
bolted to that. I'm also contemplating bolting/screwing a sheet of
plywood to the bottom of the desk, covering the foot-hole, to make
a box structure. I believe that will offer considerable reinforcement.

Thanks to all for reading, looking and guiding!

bob prohaska

  #10   Report Post  
Old August 9th 17, 06:09 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2016
Posts: 371
Default Repair/reinforcement of double pedestal desk


"bob prohaska" wrote in message
news
Sonny wrote:

Yep, pics would definitely help.


Ok, I've put a few pictures at

http://www.zefox.net/~bob/lincolndesk/

There are metal clips, each with a single screw, under the edge of
the top at the juncture with the legs, plus two in the middle of the
ends. Evidently I should start by removing the screws to see if the
top will then lift off.

The damaged M&T joint is at the occupant's far right. I'd imagine it
was whacked on something while being moved. No other damage is apparent.

The lathe is an old South Bend 10K, about 300 lbs, with 48" bed. It
will span the pedestals nicely. The reinforcement plan is to mount
a false top, possibly a laminate countertop section, with the lathe
bolted to that. I'm also contemplating bolting/screwing a sheet of
plywood to the bottom of the desk, covering the foot-hole, to make
a box structure. I believe that will offer considerable reinforcement.


I looked at your pix. If it were me I'd wipe some thickened epoxy on the
loosened tenon and whack it home. If you are a worrier, pin the tenon by
drilling through from the outside and inserting a dowel or two. You could
dowel the joints that aren't separated too.

You aren't planning on putting much of a load on it and the load will all be
downward. That should have no effect on the pedestal structures
separating. I am sure many will say, "No, no, you need to disassemble all,
clean and reassemble so the thing has the approximate strength of a
battleship". That is their opinion, not mine. Why do you think it needs
reinforcement?




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Desk pedestal joinery choices... DJ Delorie Woodworking 15 September 24th 09 07:18 PM
double pedestal desk in walnut mike hide Woodworking Plans and Photos 5 October 1st 07 01:28 AM
Steel reinforcement in concrete ? Don UK diy 4 November 29th 05 09:51 AM
CLAWFOOT CAST IRON TUB- FLOOR REINFORCEMENT DaddyMonkey Home Repair 1 August 7th 04 07:33 PM
Molding around Pedestal Desk base Steve Woodworking 4 October 24th 03 04:13 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:03 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017