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Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 8/6/2017 9:21 AM, Spalted Walt wrote:
-MIKE- wrote:

On 8/5/17 4:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/5/2017 3:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never
imagined something like that for dust.


50# will last a very long time. You just sprinkle a little and it all
works as you sweep along. It is sort of like oild sawdust.

I think I'll pick some up.
I wonder if it works on wood floors.


They seem to be contradicting themselves on their website.

http://www.zepcommercial.com/product/Sweeping-Compound

From the column on the right: "SDS & PRO TIPS"

Pro Tips
This product is safe for both hard and soft flooring.

---

From the column on the right: "Questions & Answers"
Questions And Answers
Can you use it on finished hardwood floors

Answers
Thank you for contacting us. We do not recommend applying this product to hardwood floors.

We hope this helps. If you have any additional questions, feel free to contact us.

Sincerely,

Zep Commercial | Consumer Relations Department
2 years, 6 months ago
ZepRepresentative


I'm surprised at that. I can show you a 20,000 sq ft warehouse where it
has been used for years with no ill effects. Unless they mean
unfinished wood. I can see that as it does have some sort of oil in it.


+1 - That's it.

http://www.zepcommercial.com/product/Sweeping-Compound

Questions And Answers

Can I use it on plywood floors

Answers
I wouldn't recommend using it on plywood because it's an oil-based formula.

It's recommended use is on: cement, concrete, marble and other floors in warehouses, factories, shop areas and garages.

Thank You,

Zep Commercial
3 years, 6 months ago
ZepRepresentative
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Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

In article ,
says...

On Sun, 06 Aug 2017 13:21:06 +0000, Spalted Walt
wrote:

-MIKE- wrote:

On 8/5/17 4:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/5/2017 3:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never
imagined something like that for dust.


50# will last a very long time. You just sprinkle a little and it all
works as you sweep along. It is sort of like oild sawdust.

I think I'll pick some up.
I wonder if it works on wood floors.


They seem to be contradicting themselves on their website.

http://www.zepcommercial.com/product/Sweeping-Compound

From the column on the right: "SDS & PRO TIPS"

Pro Tips
This product is safe for both hard and soft flooring.

---

From the column on the right: "Questions & Answers"
Questions And Answers
Can you use it on finished hardwood floors

Answers
Thank you for contacting us. We do not recommend applying this product to hardwood floors.

We hope this helps. If you have any additional questions, feel free to contact us.

Sincerely,

Zep Commercial | Consumer Relations Department
2 years, 6 months ago
ZepRepresentative

Interestingly enough, DustBane Corp, who first mareketted the stuff,
no longer even lists it as one of their products ---- I guess too many
imitators made it unprofitable for them???


There's oil-based and wax-based and it also comes sanded and non-sanded.
Not clear what Zep sells. For wood I believe you want non-sanded wax-
based.


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Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On 8/5/2017 6:50 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 12:27:21 -0500, Leon [email protected] wrote:

On 8/5/2017 11:23 AM,
wrote:
On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 10:58:11 -0500, Unquestionably Confused
wrote:

On 8/5/2017 10:46 AM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/4/17 10:12 PM, Doug Miller wrote:
wrote in
:


[snip]
so on. I'm wondering how well Roomba would do with the fine dust that
escapes my air filter
too, and settles out of the air hours later, or with the stuff that I
miss with the broom.


It would work great for that, if you didn't move stuff around a lot.
Unfortunately, they are easily confused.




How so, Mike? I don't own one but I always thought they cleaned in a
randomized pattern - just take off and go until they sense/touch and
object and then alter course until the next obstruction.

No, they learn the area.


That strictly depends on the particular Roomba model that you get. Only
the high end models have the mapping feature all others currently are
random.


That's what I was told buy the guy who used to design 'em. Perhaps
iRobot only designed the "smart" ones (the rest coming from China).



I am on my 3rd Roomba robot. The Roomba's learning and mapping the room
is a very recent development and still only offered on the top end
model. This feature was not available from iRobot until relatively
recently. Other brand robots did indeed map the rooms, Neato Vac's for
example.
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On 8/5/2017 3:33 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 03:12:54 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller
wrote:

wrote in :

On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 02:44:18 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller
wrote:

Any of you guys use a Roomba (or other robot vacuum cleaner) to keep your shop floor
clean? Just wondering if it works...

Only if the shop floor is clean - - -

OK, I guess maybe I should elaborate. I plan on using a broom to deal with the largest stuff, the
jointer shavings and the sawdust that escapes the dust collector, the handplane shavings, and
so on. I'm wondering how well Roomba would do with the fine dust that escapes my air filter
too, and settles out of the air hours later, or with the stuff that I miss with the broom.

From my experience (short term) with one in the house, I'd say you
will be dissapointed. It will plug the filter in no-time, as well as
fill the tiny dirt cup. Terribly ovepriced toys.


The early ones still had bugs. The first we bought was in 2008 and it
was the top of the lone Roomba, IIRC a 570 series.
I had a lot of trouble with it, especially with the gears in the brush
assembly. iRobot sent me 2 replacement gear boxes and brushes within
the first year. As they came out with newer models I learned that you
could buy the new model parts for the model I had and the unit became
quite useful. It lasted 5 years vacuuming our whole house 5 days a week.
When I replaced it I got a 700 series unit with a $100 discount from
iRobot. It was absolutely trouble free for 4 years. I picked it up to
clean it about 3 months ago and the handle broke. iRobot does not sell
a replacement handle and with a couple of e-mails back and forth they
sent me a brand new replacement. I only had to pay for shipping to
return the broken one.

My wife are extremely happy with the Roombas especially sense the first
two vacuumed our home more than 2,000 times in the past 9 years. And we
have never used our conventional vac, to vacuum the floors, since
getting the first Roomba. We keep it to vac our 9 ceiling fans.
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On 8/5/2017 11:14 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
"Leon" wrote in message
...

It will get that dust you are talking about. The upper end models have
Hepa filters although not Hepa certified. Ours sucks up enough dog
hair and
dust to build a new dog every couple of weeks.


In my case it would have to suck up the dog to stay ahead of the hair.
English Setter... his white hair forms "snow drifts" in a matter of
days... ;~)


We had that problem too, before the Great Dane it was the Choc Lab.
I'll tell you I have to empty the bin after each run and I do a thorough
cleaning of the robot on a weekly basis but I spend about 10-15 minutes
doing all of that every week. Beats the heck of doing the vacuuming my
self 5 times a week.


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On 8/5/2017 1:54 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/5/17 1:21 PM, John McGaw wrote:
On 8/4/2017 10:44 PM, Doug Miller wrote:
Any of you guys use a Roomba (or other robot vacuum cleaner) to
keep your shop floor clean? Just wondering if it works...



The best answer is "The company thought of that and made a product
for cleaning shops and it was a total bust so it was dropped."

https://www.amazon.com/iRobot-110-Di...ct_top?ie=UTF8




Shops are not meant to be _totally_ clean. If your shop is immaculate
then you aren't using it right.


I get what you're saying, John, and agree with the premise.
However, any time I do finishing, I sure wish my shop was "immaculate"
because it would save me a whole lot of time knocking the fuzz off
between coats.

There are air cleaners for the airborne stuff and I see a place for
something that would capture all that stuff on the floor before it gets
airborne.



FWIW I quit worrying about dust about 25 years ago when I switched to
using gel varnishes. Dust is not an issue.
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On 8/5/2017 2:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/5/17 2:12 PM, John McGaw wrote:
On 8/5/2017 2:54 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/5/17 1:21 PM, John McGaw wrote:
On 8/4/2017 10:44 PM, Doug Miller wrote:
Any of you guys use a Roomba (or other robot vacuum cleaner) to
keep your shop floor clean? Just wondering if it works...



The best answer is "The company thought of that and made a product
for cleaning shops and it was a total bust so it was dropped."

https://www.amazon.com/iRobot-110-Di...ct_top?ie=UTF8




Shops are not meant to be _totally_ clean. If your shop is immaculate
then you aren't using it right.

I get what you're saying, John, and agree with the premise.
However, any time I do finishing, I sure wish my shop was "immaculate"
because it would save me a whole lot of time knocking the fuzz off
between coats.

There are air cleaners for the airborne stuff and I see a place for
something that would capture all that stuff on the floor before it gets
airborne.


Something along these lines works beautifully in removing fine dust
from floors. I always find that, if you don't have a dedicated
finishing area, cleaning up as best you can, waiting a couple of
hours, and then proceeding carefully so as not to raise any remaining
dust works best. This also means turning off any 'dust filters', fans,
heaters, or air conditioners since each of these will sabotage your
efforts to get dust out of the air. That can make things pretty
uncomfortable for a while depending on season and your shop.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never imagined
something like that for dust.



When I was kid the grocery store in the small town that my grandmother
lived in used a similar product on their wooden floors. It was red in
color and had an oily feel when fresh. The oil attracts the dust much
like a dust mop does.
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On 8/5/2017 9:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/5/17 4:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/5/2017 3:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never
imagined something like that for dust.


50# will last a very long time. You just sprinkle a little and it all
works as you sweep along. It is sort of like oild sawdust.


I think I'll pick some up.
I wonder if it works on wood floors.



Absolutely. See my previous post about the old grocery store. ;~)
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On Sun, 6 Aug 2017 13:02:52 -0400, "J. Clarke"
wrote:

In article ,
says...

On Sun, 06 Aug 2017 13:21:06 +0000, Spalted Walt
wrote:

-MIKE- wrote:

On 8/5/17 4:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/5/2017 3:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never
imagined something like that for dust.


50# will last a very long time. You just sprinkle a little and it all
works as you sweep along. It is sort of like oild sawdust.

I think I'll pick some up.
I wonder if it works on wood floors.

They seem to be contradicting themselves on their website.

http://www.zepcommercial.com/product/Sweeping-Compound

From the column on the right: "SDS & PRO TIPS"

Pro Tips
This product is safe for both hard and soft flooring.

---

From the column on the right: "Questions & Answers"
Questions And Answers
Can you use it on finished hardwood floors

Answers
Thank you for contacting us. We do not recommend applying this product to hardwood floors.

We hope this helps. If you have any additional questions, feel free to contact us.

Sincerely,

Zep Commercial | Consumer Relations Department
2 years, 6 months ago
ZepRepresentative

Interestingly enough, DustBane Corp, who first mareketted the stuff,
no longer even lists it as one of their products ---- I guess too many
imitators made it unprofitable for them???


There's oil-based and wax-based and it also comes sanded and non-sanded.
Not clear what Zep sells. For wood I believe you want non-sanded wax-
based.

The latest is vegatable based - I believe it contains canola meal
(which still has some canola oil in it)
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On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 21:53:00 -0500, -MIKE-
wrote:

On 8/5/17 9:36 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:
On 8/5/2017 9:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 8/5/17 4:23 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/5/2017 3:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-50-lb...EP50/202056504


Wow, that's a new one on me! I never knew such a thing existed.
I've used similar things for oil and spilled paint, but I never
imagined something like that for dust.


50# will last a very long time. You just sprinkle a little and it
all works as you sweep along. It is sort of like oild sawdust.

I think I'll pick some up.
I wonder if it works on wood floors.


Works on any floor type, Mike. Most that I've seen has a red dye in it
so you can see it on the floor. As others have said, a little goes a
long way. Not only does the oily consistency (not enough to smear) pick
up the dust, it prevents it from becoming airborne. Others have
attested to its vintage. I first recall seeing my father using it in
our basement ca 1953 and he was hardly an innovator. ;-)



I'm getting some, that settles it. :-)


That's it's purpose, evidently. I'm going to try it too. My garage
is a disaster (though one side being full of Hardi-Plank isn't going
to make it any easier to clean).


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Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3 years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to dump the bin so often.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...op-810240-.htm

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Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3 years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to dump the bin so often.

If I had $600+ to throw around I would probably hire my part time yard
guy To vacuum the shop. He charges $15/hr. I vacuum it for free.

--
G Ross
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On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.


We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.
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On Mon, 7 Jun 2021 12:51:24 -0500, Leon [email protected] wrote:

On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.


We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


Don't feed the trolls.
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Leon [email protected] wrote in
:


We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


My biggest complaint about the Roomba is that it will "effectively"
rearrange the room. You'll keep the room in the way the Roomba wants so it
can run, clean, and get back to base.

Small price to pay, though, for not having to run that noisy distuned
wrist-twister vacuum. (Feins are better, but they still suck.)

Puckdropper


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On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.
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On 6/7/2021 2:42 PM, Puckdropper wrote:
Leon [email protected] wrote in
:


We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


My biggest complaint about the Roomba is that it will "effectively"
rearrange the room. You'll keep the room in the way the Roomba wants so it
can run, clean, and get back to base.


Build heavier furniture. We have an i7 so it does not move much
furniture, except for a certain step stool. ;~)




Small price to pay, though, for not having to run that noisy distuned
wrist-twister vacuum. (Feins are better, but they still suck.)


Exactly!



Puckdropper


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On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.


You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.

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On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.


We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.


I think that your final statement is key.

I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.

While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.

As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.
  #60   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 12,155
Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On 6/8/2021 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.

We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.


I think that your final statement is key.


There is that. but if you think a regular vacuum/Kirby, Ricar, what ever
brand, will get all the dirt out, that is not going to happen.



I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.


The regular vacuum cleaner is only going to remove the dirt in the
carpet. They do not remove dirt that has made it to the padding and or
past the padding. While an upright may do a better job as a robot vac,
it is not going to get all the dirt.

And something else to consider. Our robot vac runs 5 days a week. It
may very well do a better job than a regular vac that is only run
weekly. The robot vac can get dirt before it gets under the carpet.

One other thing, because we run our robot vac 5 days a week we see a
significant reduction in over all dust that settles on everything.

Before our robot vac we dusted our ceiling fans almost monthly. Now 3~4
times a year.

Food for thought.



While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.




As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.




  #61   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 14,845
Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 3:04:21 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.

We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.


I think that your final statement is key.

There is that. but if you think a regular vacuum/Kirby, Ricar, what ever
brand, will get all the dirt out, that is not going to happen.


Never said - or even thought - that.


I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.

The regular vacuum cleaner is only going to remove the dirt in the
carpet. They do not remove dirt that has made it to the padding and or
past the padding. While an upright may do a better job as a robot vac,
it is not going to get all the dirt.


I used the words "base of the carpet fibers" meaning the area at the
primary backing. I certainly don't expect any consumer level vacuum
to suck dirt from below the primary or secondary backing (or unitary
backing, if that is how the carpet was constructed).

I'm not even expecting a consumer vacuum to get *all* of the dirt out,
just a lot more than any robot vacuum. The more that can be removed,
the less abrasion of the fibers that will occur. I'm as concerned about
my carpet looking good, not just clean, for as long as possible.


And something else to consider. Our robot vac runs 5 days a week. It
may very well do a better job than a regular vac that is only run
weekly. The robot vac can get dirt before it gets under the carpet.


Said the guy that doesn't have any carpets. ;-)

I would imagine that it doesn't take long for dirt and sand to get to the
base of the fibers. Gravity sucks, you know. While a daily maintenance
run of the robot will certainly help, I'll wager that you'd be hard pressed
to find a robot vacuum listed as a "recommended vacuum" by any of
the major carpet manufacturers - some of which even hint at a daily
vacuuming in certain situations.

In fact, the Carpet and Rug Institute has certified only one robotic vacuum
(out of 314 certifications) and it's not going to work in the average living
room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jFcI9c6sNI



One other thing, because we run our robot vac 5 days a week we see a
significant reduction in over all dust that settles on everything.

Before our robot vac we dusted our ceiling fans almost monthly. Now 3~4
times a year.


No doubt.


Food for thought.


My thoughts haven't changed:

When it come to carpets, robotic vacuums have their place as an appearance
maintainer but not as an overall replacement for a quality upright or power-brush
canister/whole-house system. Not if you want your carpet to last as long as
possible.


While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.




As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.

  #62   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,155
Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On 6/8/2021 5:52 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 3:04:21 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.

We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.

I think that your final statement is key.

There is that. but if you think a regular vacuum/Kirby, Ricar, what ever
brand, will get all the dirt out, that is not going to happen.


Never said - or even thought - that.


I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.

The regular vacuum cleaner is only going to remove the dirt in the
carpet. They do not remove dirt that has made it to the padding and or
past the padding. While an upright may do a better job as a robot vac,
it is not going to get all the dirt.


I used the words "base of the carpet fibers" meaning the area at the
primary backing. I certainly don't expect any consumer level vacuum
to suck dirt from below the primary or secondary backing (or unitary
backing, if that is how the carpet was constructed).

I'm not even expecting a consumer vacuum to get *all* of the dirt out,
just a lot more than any robot vacuum. The more that can be removed,
the less abrasion of the fibers that will occur. I'm as concerned about
my carpet looking good, not just clean, for as long as possible.


And something else to consider. Our robot vac runs 5 days a week. It
may very well do a better job than a regular vac that is only run
weekly. The robot vac can get dirt before it gets under the carpet.


Said the guy that doesn't have any carpets. ;-)

I would imagine that it doesn't take long for dirt and sand to get to the
base of the fibers. Gravity sucks, you know. While a daily maintenance
run of the robot will certainly help, I'll wager that you'd be hard pressed
to find a robot vacuum listed as a "recommended vacuum" by any of
the major carpet manufacturers - some of which even hint at a daily
vacuuming in certain situations.

In fact, the Carpet and Rug Institute has certified only one robotic vacuum
(out of 314 certifications) and it's not going to work in the average living
room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jFcI9c6sNI



One other thing, because we run our robot vac 5 days a week we see a
significant reduction in over all dust that settles on everything.

Before our robot vac we dusted our ceiling fans almost monthly. Now 3~4
times a year.


No doubt.


Food for thought.


My thoughts haven't changed:

When it come to carpets, robotic vacuums have their place as an appearance
maintainer but not as an overall replacement for a quality upright or power-brush
canister/whole-house system. Not if you want your carpet to last as long as
possible.


While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.




As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.


Just a few more thoughts. I agree with a lot of what you say. And
because flooring experts indicate that a carpet is not a long term
flooring choice, it is an alternative to more expensive hard surface
flooring. AND carpet is probably preferred in colder climates and or
those that want something soft under their feet. Slightly getting off
subject here but....
I have not yet seen a carpet that looks good for an extended period of
time. We had carpet up until about 20 years ago and went all tile.
We got an average of 10 years out of a carpet and we vacuumed regularly.

Where am I going with this? I have to believe that the regular vacuums,
with a "beater bar" does damage also. It is after all beating the
fibers as the dirt passes through.

I do not think that a robot vac will pull more dirt out unless it is
used daily, before the dirt has a chance to sink deeper down into the
fibers.

  #63   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,845
Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 8:04:45 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 5:52 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 3:04:21 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.

We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.

I think that your final statement is key.
There is that. but if you think a regular vacuum/Kirby, Ricar, what ever
brand, will get all the dirt out, that is not going to happen.


Never said - or even thought - that.


I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.
The regular vacuum cleaner is only going to remove the dirt in the
carpet. They do not remove dirt that has made it to the padding and or
past the padding. While an upright may do a better job as a robot vac,
it is not going to get all the dirt.


I used the words "base of the carpet fibers" meaning the area at the
primary backing. I certainly don't expect any consumer level vacuum
to suck dirt from below the primary or secondary backing (or unitary
backing, if that is how the carpet was constructed).

I'm not even expecting a consumer vacuum to get *all* of the dirt out,
just a lot more than any robot vacuum. The more that can be removed,
the less abrasion of the fibers that will occur. I'm as concerned about
my carpet looking good, not just clean, for as long as possible.


And something else to consider. Our robot vac runs 5 days a week. It
may very well do a better job than a regular vac that is only run
weekly. The robot vac can get dirt before it gets under the carpet.


Said the guy that doesn't have any carpets. ;-)

I would imagine that it doesn't take long for dirt and sand to get to the
base of the fibers. Gravity sucks, you know. While a daily maintenance
run of the robot will certainly help, I'll wager that you'd be hard pressed
to find a robot vacuum listed as a "recommended vacuum" by any of
the major carpet manufacturers - some of which even hint at a daily
vacuuming in certain situations.

In fact, the Carpet and Rug Institute has certified only one robotic vacuum
(out of 314 certifications) and it's not going to work in the average living
room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jFcI9c6sNI



One other thing, because we run our robot vac 5 days a week we see a
significant reduction in over all dust that settles on everything.

Before our robot vac we dusted our ceiling fans almost monthly. Now 3~4
times a year.


No doubt.


Food for thought.


My thoughts haven't changed:

When it come to carpets, robotic vacuums have their place as an appearance
maintainer but not as an overall replacement for a quality upright or power-brush
canister/whole-house system. Not if you want your carpet to last as long as
possible.


While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.



As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.

Just a few more thoughts. I agree with a lot of what you say. And
because flooring experts indicate that a carpet is not a long term
flooring choice, it is an alternative to more expensive hard surface
flooring. AND carpet is probably preferred in colder climates and or
those that want something soft under their feet. Slightly getting off
subject here but....


All of that is true and in my case both the colder climate and soft surface
are the reasons I prefer carpet. I have hardwood under my carpets. I choose
to cover it with something soft.

BTW...you left out the noise muffling that carpet provides.

I have not yet seen a carpet that looks good for an extended period of
time. We had carpet up until about 20 years ago and went all tile.
We got an average of 10 years out of a carpet and we vacuumed regularly.


It's all relative. "Extended period of time" is an ambiguous phrase. There are
different grades of the same carpet and the higher you go, the longer it will
last under the same conditions. Besides the basic quality of any specific brand
and model, most quality carpets come in 3 face weights, sometimes referred to
as Good-Better-Best to keep it simple for the consumer.

When we replaced our carpet a couple of years ago we wanted the highest weight
available in the high quality carpet we chose. We had to have an installer come
out and test our stairs to see if it would work. We wanted a Hollywood style
installation where the carpet wraps around the bullnose and then goes straight
down the riser as opposed to Waterfall where the carpet just cascades over the
edge and down at an angle to the back of the tread. Certain carpets, especially
high face weight carpets, can be hard to wrap around the bullnose. Luckily the
installer knew what he was doing and said "No problem. It'll look great." He was
right. wRec relate: We tested it with a sample of the carpet and a couple of bar
clamps to bend it tightly around the bullnose. ;-)

The higher weight, high quality carpet will give us an "extended period" when
compared to the lower weight, lower quality options.


Where am I going with this? I have to believe that the regular vacuums,
with a "beater bar" does damage also. It is after all beating the
fibers as the dirt passes through.


That is a consideration, although a properly adjusted, quality vacuum can
limit the damage and therefore extend the life of the carpet. Different types
of carpets need to be vacuumed differently to ensure the longest life possible.
Speed and direction matter. One of the most important adjustments is the
bristle height to avoid matting, fuzzing and loss of tip definition. Some carpets,
such as certain berbers, shouldn't be vacuumed with a bristle brush.

If you are interested, the CRI has a pretty stringent procedure for certifying
vacuums:

Lots of info he

https://carpet-rug.org/testing/seal-...ogram/vacuums/

Full test procedure he

https://carpet-rug.org/downloads/cri-test-method-114/


I do not think that a robot vac will pull more dirt out unless it is
used daily, before the dirt has a chance to sink deeper down into the
fibers.

  #64   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,155
Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On 6/9/2021 10:41 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 8:04:45 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 5:52 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 3:04:21 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/8/2021 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 12:44:37 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
On 6/7/2021 5:53 PM, Bob D wrote:
On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 12:51:32 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
On 6/5/2021 4:01 PM, Patrick Denker wrote:
Zombie post, but I was Googling this subject out of curiosity. The
answer is yes, absolutely. I've been using a Roomba 960 as my
overworked, much-abused and utterly stalwart shop-sawdust helper for 3
years. It fills up fast and sometimes chokes on nails and wood scraps
but keeps on chugging. I use it in combo with a large shop vac connected
to table saw dust port + overhead shop air filter. Roomba can't clean up
huge piles of sawdust but is always scurrying around my feet keeping it
under control. Emptying bin now and then way easier than shop-vaccing
whole floor. Plus you can set schedule so it cleans dust every day as it
settles. Recommend the newer self-emptying models so you don't have to
dump the bin so often.

We have had a Roomba since 2008. And we will likely always have one.

If I ran a Roomba in my shop I would not get anything done between
emptying the bin and waiting on it to get out of the way.

With that said, self cleaning to empty the bin may work but not as
quickly as simply sweeping or blowing the dust out.

We got our first roomba about a month ago, a model 8+ from Costco. It has the built-in vaccuum in the base that automatically cleans the Roomba bin when it docks. It's working well. I am still figuring out the mapping and setting up the clean zones and barrier zones. I think we will be happy with it, but I am not getting rid of our Kirby Vacuum cleaner. It does the industrial clean. The Roomba is a maintainer.

You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the
shop/garage and clean it weekly. I pull the sweepers, rotating ball
wheel, side 3 prong sweeper, and dust bin out. I blow the vacuumm and
the dust bin out and then witrh a damp microfiber towel wipe the entire
under side and front bumpers. ALSO wipe the 3 prong brush clean.

Especially wipe the front bumper and the 3 prong brush. If left dirty
they will leave/transfer dirt lines on your base boards.

I have been doing this for the past 13 years and seems to keep things
cleaner.

We still have our pro vac too, but it pretty much only gets used with
the hose and wand to do the ceiling fan blades.

And we only have hard floors, no carpet or rugs.

I think that your final statement is key.
There is that. but if you think a regular vacuum/Kirby, Ricar, what ever
brand, will get all the dirt out, that is not going to happen.

Never said - or even thought - that.


I can't imagine that even the best made autonomous robotic vacuum
cleaner could clean a carpet as well as it needs to be cleaned. Only a
quality upright has the weight, power and brush configuration to remove
the dirt at base of the carpet fibers.
The regular vacuum cleaner is only going to remove the dirt in the
carpet. They do not remove dirt that has made it to the padding and or
past the padding. While an upright may do a better job as a robot vac,
it is not going to get all the dirt.

I used the words "base of the carpet fibers" meaning the area at the
primary backing. I certainly don't expect any consumer level vacuum
to suck dirt from below the primary or secondary backing (or unitary
backing, if that is how the carpet was constructed).

I'm not even expecting a consumer vacuum to get *all* of the dirt out,
just a lot more than any robot vacuum. The more that can be removed,
the less abrasion of the fibers that will occur. I'm as concerned about
my carpet looking good, not just clean, for as long as possible.


And something else to consider. Our robot vac runs 5 days a week. It
may very well do a better job than a regular vac that is only run
weekly. The robot vac can get dirt before it gets under the carpet.

Said the guy that doesn't have any carpets. ;-)

I would imagine that it doesn't take long for dirt and sand to get to the
base of the fibers. Gravity sucks, you know. While a daily maintenance
run of the robot will certainly help, I'll wager that you'd be hard pressed
to find a robot vacuum listed as a "recommended vacuum" by any of
the major carpet manufacturers - some of which even hint at a daily
vacuuming in certain situations.

In fact, the Carpet and Rug Institute has certified only one robotic vacuum
(out of 314 certifications) and it's not going to work in the average living
room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jFcI9c6sNI



One other thing, because we run our robot vac 5 days a week we see a
significant reduction in over all dust that settles on everything.

Before our robot vac we dusted our ceiling fans almost monthly. Now 3~4
times a year.

No doubt.


Food for thought.

My thoughts haven't changed:

When it come to carpets, robotic vacuums have their place as an appearance
maintainer but not as an overall replacement for a quality upright or power-brush
canister/whole-house system. Not if you want your carpet to last as long as
possible.


While the *surface* of the carpet might look clean after using a robotic
vacuum, the sand and dirt particles are still doing their damage. When
the abrasive dirt - especially sand - settles into the pile and then gets
walked on, it abrades the fibers. Eventually the carpet begins to look thin,
dull and flat. Carpet doesn't just wear directly because people walk on it,
it also wears - thins out - because the base of the fibers are being cut by
embedded dirt.



As Bob D said: "The Roomba is a maintainer." Tossing your quality, yet
unwieldy upright is a really bad idea. Depending on how much traffic a
carpet sees and how dirty the overall environment is, a deep vacuuming
should be done at least once a week if you want your carpets to last - not
just *look* clean.

Just a few more thoughts. I agree with a lot of what you say. And
because flooring experts indicate that a carpet is not a long term
flooring choice, it is an alternative to more expensive hard surface
flooring. AND carpet is probably preferred in colder climates and or
those that want something soft under their feet. Slightly getting off
subject here but....


All of that is true and in my case both the colder climate and soft surface
are the reasons I prefer carpet. I have hardwood under my carpets. I choose
to cover it with something soft.

BTW...you left out the noise muffling that carpet provides.


I suppose, when we bought and did the walk through our, current home
with tile floors, it was echo'y.

After we moved the furniture in, we do not notice.

Carpet does not enough sound deadening to be of any advantage to "us".



I have not yet seen a carpet that looks good for an extended period of
time. We had carpet up until about 20 years ago and went all tile.
We got an average of 10 years out of a carpet and we vacuumed regularly.


It's all relative. "Extended period of time" is an ambiguous phrase. There are
different grades of the same carpet and the higher you go, the longer it will
last under the same conditions. Besides the basic quality of any specific brand
and model, most quality carpets come in 3 face weights, sometimes referred to
as Good-Better-Best to keep it simple for the consumer.

When we replaced our carpet a couple of years ago we wanted the highest weight
available in the high quality carpet we chose. We had to have an installer come
out and test our stairs to see if it would work. We wanted a Hollywood style
installation where the carpet wraps around the bullnose and then goes straight
down the riser as opposed to Waterfall where the carpet just cascades over the
edge and down at an angle to the back of the tread. Certain carpets, especially
high face weight carpets, can be hard to wrap around the bullnose. Luckily the
installer knew what he was doing and said "No problem. It'll look great." He was
right. wRec relate: We tested it with a sample of the carpet and a couple of bar
clamps to bend it tightly around the bullnose. ;-)


Hollywood huh? I did know that there was a nome for that. 99% of new
homes being built, down here, have carpeted stairs and everything is
covered. Only the spindles and hand rails are not covered with carpet.
;~) Builders claim a slipping liability and rarely will allow wood as
an option on the stairs.

We had that for about 4 years and upgraded to all wood steps and risers.
Risers being painted.



The higher weight, high quality carpet will give us an "extended period" when
compared to the lower weight, lower quality options.


No doubt, our second carpet outlasted our first carpet on our first home.


Where am I going with this? I have to believe that the regular vacuums,
with a "beater bar" does damage also. It is after all beating the
fibers as the dirt passes through.


That is a consideration, although a properly adjusted, quality vacuum can
limit the damage and therefore extend the life of the carpet. Different types
of carpets need to be vacuumed differently to ensure the longest life possible.
Speed and direction matter. One of the most important adjustments is the
bristle height to avoid matting, fuzzing and loss of tip definition. Some carpets,
such as certain berbers, shouldn't be vacuumed with a bristle brush.

If you are interested, the CRI has a pretty stringent procedure for certifying
vacuums:

Lots of info he

https://carpet-rug.org/testing/seal-...ogram/vacuums/

Full test procedure he

https://carpet-rug.org/downloads/cri-test-method-114/


Well thanks but no, we are done with carpet, it tends to be a too high
of maintenance item, with pets, it stinks. And it does no last as long
a hard surface. Do do have small throw rugs in places but that is not
an issue.




I do not think that a robot vac will pull more dirt out unless it is
used daily, before the dirt has a chance to sink deeper down into the
fibers.


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Default Anybody use a Roomba in the workshop?

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 11:44:37 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
You being new with the Roomba, I would advise that you take it to the

shop/garage and clean it weekly.

Great advise, Leon.

Thanks,
Bob
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