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Default Another project completed and set up

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/
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On 4/7/2014 5:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Nicely engineered and flawlessly executed. I really like the job you did
on the top.

Well done, all 'round, by Bubba Da Vinci.

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Default Another project completed and set up

On 4/7/2014 6:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/

Nice, so I guess you had no problem then with the saw stop ... she's got
you beat on those two tiny machines.. Your big iron at least has some
mass... :-)

Nice work.

--
Jeff
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Default Another project completed and set up

On 4/7/14, 5:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and
the soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the
shorter 8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt
it best to make the top into two sections, split in half front to
back. The gap is hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom
and 5 Domino tenons, on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves
together and in registration to each other. The front and back
apron/bridges are attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts
threaded into eight threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the
right is a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/



Gorgeous as usual! Those sewing machines are a lot like woodworking
tools and musical instruments. You can *really* tell the difference in
quality and performance in the expensive ones.


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Default Another project completed and set up

On 4/7/2014 6:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Nice. I was able to peek without my wife seeing it. She only has one
Viking machine.



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woodchucker wrote:
On 4/7/2014 6:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/

Nice, so I guess you had no problem then with the saw stop ... she's got
you beat on those two tiny machines.. Your big iron at least has some mass... :-)

Nice work.



Thank you. On the opposite side of the room is her "long arm" machine. It
sits in the two similar cabinets that I built just before Christmas last
year, painted the same mint green color. That machine is worth more than
double the two machines pictured in today's pictures.
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-MIKE- wrote:
On 4/7/14, 5:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and
the soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the
shorter 8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt
it best to make the top into two sections, split in half front to
back. The gap is hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom
and 5 Domino tenons, on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves
together and in registration to each other. The front and back
apron/bridges are attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts
threaded into eight threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the
right is a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/



Gorgeous as usual! Those sewing machines are a lot like woodworking
tools and musical instruments. You can *really* tell the difference in
quality and performance in the expensive ones.



Thank you. Yeah they go and go and go and need little attention.
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Swingman wrote:
On 4/7/2014 5:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Nicely engineered and flawlessly executed. I really like the job you did on the top.

Well done, all 'round, by Bubba Da Vinci.



Thank you, thank you da' Bubba Brother!
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 4/7/2014 6:11 PM, Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Nice. I was able to peek without my wife seeing it. She only has one Viking machine.


Thank you Ed. Your wife only has one Now. :-). That will probably change.
LOL
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Quite a nice project, and well thought out.
john

"Leon" wrote in message
...

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/



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On 4/7/2014 8:43 PM, jloomis wrote:
Quite a nice project, and well thought out.
john


Thank you John, My wife agrees, the layout was her idea. ;~)




















"Leon" wrote in message
...

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

The desk top is approximately 97" x 30" total. Because of the shorter
8' ceilings and hair pin turn at the top of the stairs I felt it best to
make the top into two sections, split in half front to back. The gap is
hardly noticeable. Two draw latches on the bottom and 5 Domino tenons,
on the mating edges of the tops hold the halves together and in
registration to each other. The front and back apron/bridges are
attached to the end cabinets with 5/16" bolts threaded into eight
threaded inserts on the sides of both cabinets.


Empty

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/13703016725/


Left View with $5k worth of sewing machines, The one on the left is
simply a HD Viking Husqvarna sewing machine and the one on the right is
a Husqvarna Topaz embroidery machine.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


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"Leon" lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote in message

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it
is complete and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)


Nice job as always. Bet you are in like Flynn with ther missus, huh

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Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

Super Job! I know she is happy with it. What is the charge for all
that? Is she gonna make you a custom quilted cover for the SawStop?


--
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 If at first you do succeed, try not 
 to look astonished. 






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On 4/8/2014 4:56 AM, dadiOH wrote:
"Leon" lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote in message

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it
is complete and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)


Nice job as always. Bet you are in like Flynn with ther missus, huh



Thank you! Yeah I need to take advantage soon though. LOL
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On 4/8/2014 6:52 AM, G. Ross wrote:
Leon wrote:
3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

The only thing real fancy is the joinery, which you cannot see, and the
soft close 24" full extension soft close drawer slides.

Super Job! I know she is happy with it. What is the charge for all
that? Is she gonna make you a custom quilted cover for the SawStop?



Thank you. The quilt idea for the tools is not a bad idea. ;~)


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On Monday, 7 April 2014 23:11:39 UTC+1, Leon wrote:

Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/


Has that machine on the right got an ignition key?!

:-)
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On 4/8/2014 9:27 AM, wrote:
On Monday, 7 April 2014 23:11:39 UTC+1, Leon wrote:

Right View

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb112...n/photostream/

Has that machine on the right got an ignition key?!

:-)



LOL No, that is a dongle.
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On Tuesday, 8 April 2014 15:46:16 UTC+1, Leon wrote:

LOL No, that is a dongle.


Ha! I was gonna say...!
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wrote:
On Tuesday, 8 April 2014 15:46:16 UTC+1, Leon wrote:

LOL No, that is a dongle.


Ha! I was gonna say...!


Well, actually it almost acts like an ignition key. There are procedures
that you can't do unless it is plugged in.
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On Tue, 08 Apr 2014 09:46:16 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
Has that machine on the right got an ignition key?!


LOL No, that is a dongle.


A dongle that can connect to what? A computer, some other accessory or
maybe something else?


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On Wednesday, 9 April 2014 14:35:03 UTC+1, Leon wrote:

This particular machine is an embroidery machine. The dongle is used to
store embroidery patterns and to calculate stitches needed and where on
the x,y grid, and to calculate which stitches are what color.


That is very cool! :-)
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On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)


Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.

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On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)


Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.


Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets and
furniture.
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Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)


Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.


Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets
and furniture.


Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is
very attractive.


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Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)

Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.


Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets and furniture.


Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is very attractive.


No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult for a
right hander.
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Leon wrote:
Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:


Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is very attractive.


No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult for a
right hander.


Didn't stop Django.

http://www.openculture.com/2012/08/d...technique.html

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Leon wrote:
Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)
Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.

Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets and furniture.

Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is very attractive.

No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult for a
right hander.

I don't think that's true. Lighter strings would be easier to push down
too. What might be difficult is "finding the time".
The first couple of months can be slow going. So, it you are not going
to play guitar, at least don't blame it on your thumb.
I bet Swingman would be glad to help too. He might have you on stage in
a few weeks! : )

Bill

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On 4/10/2014 6:24 PM, Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)
Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.

Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets
and furniture.
Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is
very attractive.

No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult for a
right hander.

I don't think that's true. Lighter strings would be easier to push down
too. What might be difficult is "finding the time".
The first couple of months can be slow going. So, it you are not going
to play guitar, at least don't blame it on your thumb.
I bet Swingman would be glad to help too. He might have you on stage in
a few weeks! : )

Bill



IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings. At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar are
much stiffer than a Uke.
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Leon wrote:
On 4/10/2014 6:24 PM, Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is
complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)
Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.

Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets
and furniture.
Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is
very attractive.
No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half
of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult
for a
right hander.

I don't think that's true. Lighter strings would be easier to push down
too. What might be difficult is "finding the time".
The first couple of months can be slow going. So, it you are not going
to play guitar, at least don't blame it on your thumb.
I bet Swingman would be glad to help too. He might have you on stage in
a few weeks! : )

Bill



IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings.

To many, using the thumb that way is considered poor technique. So,
it's absolutely not required.
Strings on an electric guitar are probably easiest to push down.
Classical guitar strings may require
less force to hold them down, I'm not sure; I know they are strung under
much less tension.


At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar
are much stiffer than a Uke.




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On 4/10/2014 8:12 PM, Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/10/2014 6:24 PM, Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
Bill wrote:
Leon wrote:
On 4/9/2014 9:20 PM, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:11:39 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

3 weeks after buying the materials for the sewing desk it is
complete
and ready for my wife to clutter up. ;~)
Leon your your work is beyond fantastic!! Have you ever built fine
guitars? I'll bet you could be a world class luthier.

Thank you Gary, No, I have not done much of anything except cabinets
and furniture.
Can you play a guitar, Leon? I can totally understand not wanted to
build a guitar I didn't want to play.
For a player, I think the concept of building your own instrument is
very attractive.
No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half
of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult
for a
right hander.
I don't think that's true. Lighter strings would be easier to push down
too. What might be difficult is "finding the time".
The first couple of months can be slow going. So, it you are not going
to play guitar, at least don't blame it on your thumb.
I bet Swingman would be glad to help too. He might have you on stage in
a few weeks! : )

Bill



IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings.

To many, using the thumb that way is considered poor technique. So,
it's absolutely not required.
Strings on an electric guitar are probably easiest to push down.
Classical guitar strings may require
less force to hold them down, I'm not sure; I know they are strung under
much less tension.


Ummm how do you tune the guitar correctly if under less tension? Do you
actually play a guitar?







At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar
are much stiffer than a Uke.



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IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings.

To many, using the thumb that way is considered poor technique. So,
it's absolutely not required.
Strings on an electric guitar are probably easiest to push down.
Classical guitar strings may require
less force to hold them down, I'm not sure; I know they are strung under
much less tension.


Ummm how do you tune the guitar correctly if under less tension? Do
you actually play a guitar?



Classical guitars have nylon strings, thus lower tension. In fact, if
you put steel strings on a classical, you'll probably break it (so I
hear), because they are not made for the same amount of tension. Yes, I
can play a guitar. I'm an amateur. Not a pro, like Swingman. I think
the invention of the Internet took away alot of the time I used to spend
at guitar. There are alot of different guitar playing styles. If you
could be content learning chords for some folk or country songs it
wouldn't take too long. I'm sure you can get all of the advise you
need here if you ask. The first thing you would need to decide is where
the "time" is going to come from. I think it's generally accepted that
1/2 hour per day will work, but it takes me half that long just to get
"warmed up".

"Angie.. Angie.. when will those clouds all disappear?
Angie, Angie, where will it lead us from here?
With no loving in our souls and no money in our coats
You can't say we're satisfied
But Angie, Angie, you can't say we never tried..



....867-5309... Jenny Jenny, who can I turn to?
(I learned my "barre chords" on that one... : ) )

Bill







At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar
are much stiffer than a Uke.




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Bill wrote:


IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings.
To many, using the thumb that way is considered poor technique. So,
it's absolutely not required.
Strings on an electric guitar are probably easiest to push down.
Classical guitar strings may require
less force to hold them down, I'm not sure; I know they are strung
under
much less tension.


Ummm how do you tune the guitar correctly if under less tension? Do
you actually play a guitar?



Classical guitars have nylon strings, thus lower tension. In fact, if
you put steel strings on a classical, you'll probably break it (so I
hear), because they are not made for the same amount of tension. Yes,
I can play a guitar. I'm an amateur. Not a pro, like Swingman. I
think the invention of the Internet took away alot of the time I used
to spend at guitar. There are alot of different guitar playing
styles. If you could be content learning chords for some folk or
country songs it wouldn't take too long. I'm sure you can get all of
the advise you need here if you ask. The first thing you would need
to decide is where the "time" is going to come from. I think it's
generally accepted that 1/2 hour per day will work, but it takes me
half that long just to get "warmed up".


This one sounds just like me! ; )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1_Do_fc

I remember walking down the street playing it A cappella








At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar
are much stiffer than a Uke.




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On Thu, 10 Apr 2014 06:16:23 -0500, Leon wrote:
No. I played a ukulele when I was a kid but having chopped of half of my
left thumb would probably make learning to play a guitar difficult for a
right hander.


Well, you could learn to play with your teeth. Note: He is not using
any thumbs to do much.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrL5APQHMxY
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Bill wrote:

IIRC some of the chords require a thumb to wrap around and press the
string/strings.
To many, using the thumb that way is considered poor technique. So,
it's absolutely not required.
Strings on an electric guitar are probably easiest to push down.
Classical guitar strings may require
less force to hold them down, I'm not sure; I know they are strung under
much less tension.


Ummm how do you tune the guitar correctly if under less tension? Do
you actually play a guitar?



Classical guitars have nylon strings, thus lower tension.


Actually they have steel string too.


In fact, if you put steel strings on a classical, you'll probably break
it (so I hear), because they are not made for the same amount of tension.

I think you might be in a bit over your head here Bill, I certainly am, but
do know you are doing a lot of guessing. :-(

Take a look here, this is the brand guitar that Linda Lowe owns. Scroll
down to the close up of the strings.

http://artisanguitars.com/collings-o...-appointments/

Regardless, Most of what I build I never use, I would not have a problem
with building a guitar and not using it.. I would have a problem with
building something that resembled a guitar and sounded terrible. I highly
suspect that knowing how to play a guitar would be instrumental in building
one that might be at least a cut above average.


Yes, I can play a guitar. I'm an amateur. Not a pro, like Swingman. I
think the invention of the Internet took away alot of the time I used to
spend at guitar. There are alot of different guitar playing styles. If you
could be content learning chords for some folk or country songs it wouldn't
take too long. I'm sure you can get all of the advise you need here if
you ask. The first thing you would need to decide is where the "time" is
going to come from. I think it's generally accepted that 1/2 hour per day
will work, but it takes me half that long just to get "warmed up".

"Angie.. Angie.. when will those clouds all disappear?
Angie, Angie, where will it lead us from here?
With no loving in our souls and no money in our coats
You can't say we're satisfied
But Angie, Angie, you can't say we never tried..



...867-5309... Jenny Jenny, who can I turn to?
(I learned my "barre chords" on that one... : ) )

Bill







At least I did with my Uke.

I did try the guitar when I was a teenager, the strings on a guitar
are much stiffer than a Uke.




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On 4/11/2014 4:07 AM, Bill wrote:
Yes, I can play a guitar. I'm an amateur. Not a pro, like Swingman.


Bzzzt ... I can guarantee you, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you play
better guitar than I do.

Never more than a mediocre guitar player at best, at one time 'fair to
middlin' with Travis style and Blues finger picking; good enough on
rhythm to not embarrass myself onstage (mainly because I loved chords
and learned a bunch so I could play what we called "sock" guitar,
backing up fiddle players when I was younger), and always absolutely
terrible at playing leads.

Actually played much better 5 string banjo than guitar, but my chops are
long gone on both guitar and banjo these days. (noticed that guitars are
now smart enough to turn red with embarrassment, in their stands, when
they see me coming these days).

Mostly a bass player by trade, playing both upright and electric bass
.... I do love tickling your wives and girlfriend's bottom ends, and
making them move.

BTW, Mike Marlow is a good guitar player and songwriter, if you didn't
know that.

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On 4/11/2014 7:52 AM, Leon wrote:
Take a look here, this is the brand guitar that Linda Lowe owns. Scroll
down to the close up of the strings.

http://artisanguitars.com/collings-o...-appointments/



Here's Linda's actual 1977 Collings guitar, featured in a "Serious
Guitars" ad in 'Guitar Player' magazine a few years back:

https://picasaweb.google.com/1113554...76929962179 4

She does let me fondle it on occasion, but not as much as when we were
younger and playing together a lot.

--
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Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
https://www.google.com/+eWoodShop
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On 4/11/14, 8:15 AM, Swingman wrote:
Mostly a bass player by trade, playing both upright and electric bass
... I do love tickling your wives and girlfriend's bottom ends, and
making them move.


Bass players are always such pervs. :-p


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
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---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply

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On 04/10/2014 07:48 PM, Leon wrote:

Ummm how do you tune the guitar correctly if under less tension? Do you
actually play a guitar?


Some years back, Richy Furey did a concert here. He tuned his guitar a
half step low (maybe to match his vocal range?), and would just capo up
if he needed to.

One can also, of course, use light gauge strings instead of medium or
heavy gauge...

....Kevin
--
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Juneau, Alaska
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb
"In the history of the world, no one has ever washed a rented car."
- Lawrence Summers
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On 4/11/2014 10:03 AM, -MIKE- wrote:
On 4/11/14, 8:15 AM, Swingman wrote:
Mostly a bass player by trade, playing both upright and electric bass
... I do love tickling your wives and girlfriend's bottom ends, and
making them move.


Bass players are always such pervs. :-p


Bofus have to be ... drummers and bass players only get to see the chick
singers from behind.

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