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Old April 19th 12, 05:28 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default dent repair

I want to fix some superficial dents in the rails on a pool table.
Most of these are shallow and did not break the surface (they look
like they came from impact with billiard balls). Any thoughts on
using burn in sticks vs drop filling with lacquer? I assume the
finish is some kind of lacquer.

Thanks.

Charles

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Old April 19th 12, 07:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default dent repair

On Apr 19, 1:49*pm, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:
wrote:
I want to fix some superficial dents in the rails on a pool table.
Most of these are shallow and did not break the surface (they look
like they came from impact with billiard balls). *Any thoughts on
using burn in sticks vs drop filling with lacquer? *I assume the
finish is some kind of lacquer.


So - why do you assume some kind of lacquer? *It may be, but I'm wondering
why you arrive at that assumption. *If it is, my earlier post could work
well for you, as steaming can indeed bring things back. *But...

As for "burn in sticks" and/or "drop filling with lacquer" - I would
recommend against any such ideas. *You will always see that repair, or they
will always be weak areas.

It's really hard to say without seeing the damaged areas, but my first
attempt (based on your description) would be the steam raising that I
suggested in my previous post.

--

-Mike-


I have steamed out dents before very successfully on unfinished wood,
but have read that the steam would likely damage a finished surface
and also didn't know if it would effectively penetrate through the
finish anyway. As far as why I assume lacquer, it's because I think
(but am not sure) that the finish seemed to get a little softer with
lacquer thinner in an inconspicous area.

Charles


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Old April 20th 12, 02:35 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default dent repair

On Apr 19, 8:10*pm, wrote:


Steam them out???


Yep - It takes some care and that is why Mike suggested Googling. The
process usually involves putting a damp cloth over the dent and VERY
CAREFULLY applying heat with a hot iron (or similar source). This
forces small amounts of steam into the wood fibers, expanding the
wood. On finished wood, that hasn't been marred, you might have to
introduce a few small needle pricks to allow the seam past the
finish. I have pulled dents mostly out of table tops without filling.

Now - I have said too much. The OP needs to follow the original
suggestion and Google for some YouTube or other direction. If you
screw up you can stain the wood.

RonB
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Old April 20th 12, 03:43 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default dent repair

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 18:35:03 -0700 (PDT), RonB
wrote:

On Apr 19, 8:10*pm, wrote:


Steam them out???


Yep - It takes some care and that is why Mike suggested Googling. The
process usually involves putting a damp cloth over the dent and VERY
CAREFULLY applying heat with a hot iron (or similar source). This
forces small amounts of steam into the wood fibers, expanding the
wood. On finished wood, that hasn't been marred, you might have to
introduce a few small needle pricks to allow the seam past the
finish. I have pulled dents mostly out of table tops without filling.

Now - I have said too much. The OP needs to follow the original
suggestion and Google for some YouTube or other direction. If you
screw up you can stain the wood.

RonB

I wasn't questioning steaming it out. It was a suggestion - as in
"have you thought to steam it out?"
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Old April 20th 12, 04:00 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,134
Default dent repair

On Apr 19, 9:43*pm, wrote:
On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 18:35:03 -0700 (PDT), RonB
wrote:









On Apr 19, 8:10*pm, wrote:


Steam them out???


Yep - It takes some care and that is why Mike suggested Googling. *The
process usually involves putting a damp cloth over the dent and VERY
CAREFULLY applying heat with a hot iron (or similar source). *This
forces small amounts of steam into the wood fibers, expanding the
wood. *On finished wood, that hasn't been marred, you might have to
introduce a few small needle pricks to allow the seam past the
finish. *I have pulled dents mostly out of table tops without filling.


Now - I have said too much. *The OP needs to follow the original
suggestion and Google for some YouTube or other direction. *If you
screw up you can stain the wood.


RonB


*I wasn't questioning steaming it out. It was a suggestion - as in
"have you thought to steam it out?"


Oh. Sorry about that. Mike suggested steaming about two responses
down. I misunderstood.

RonB


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