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Old April 3rd 12, 07:17 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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"Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net wrote in message
b.com...
I had a computer go down last week. Turns out that the power supply was
clogged with dust and needed to be replaced. It was probably under
powered too, which added to its demise. Talking to some friends, this has
happened to two more people in the last 3 months. All of them multi
monitor machines running some big apps. Regular computers did not seem to
suffer from the same type of problem.

The tech suggested regular cleaning of the interior of the case every two
months. Again, this is probably overkill for most machines, but we have
three examples here of where we probably could have prevented the problems
we had. He suggested a small compressor for this purpose. He had one in
his shop. I have no problem with getting a small compressor to make my
computers happy. It is just that my beloved and other folks working in
the offices would have extreme objections to a noisy, pancake compressor
starting up.

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air. I have a small
vacuum cleaner which will do an OK job cleaning. But I need some
compressed air to get everything really clean. I need something small,
quiet and not scary to tool phobic office workers (or wives). Any
suggestions?

I was thinking of the baby compressors that run artist's air brushes. But
did not think they were powerful enough. Maybe even a fireplace bellows
may work. I looked at a small compressor from Harbor Freight and was
assured that it was very noisy. So that won't work. Maybe I am asking
too much, inexpensive, quiet and effective. Any input from you guys would
be appreciated.


You cannot get away from the noise of most any kind of compressor. We run an
internet business with many computers, I also have a wood shop with a
compressor. To blow out a computer, we either carry it into the workshop and
use the compressor there, it also allows the dirt, fluff and whatever that
blows out to land in the sawdust. To work on a computer in the office, I
connect a couple of 50 foot hoses to the compressor to clear out the
computer. The noise stays in the workshop. You will have to vacuum up all
the crud that blows out so that it doesn't just get sucked back into the
computer.


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Old April 3rd 12, 07:19 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Off Topic: Compressors and Computers

I had a computer go down last week. Turns out that the power supply was
clogged with dust and needed to be replaced. It was probably under powered
too, which added to its demise. Talking to some friends, this has happened
to two more people in the last 3 months. All of them multi monitor machines
running some big apps. Regular computers did not seem to suffer from the
same type of problem.

The tech suggested regular cleaning of the interior of the case every two
months. Again, this is probably overkill for most machines, but we have
three examples here of where we probably could have prevented the problems
we had. He suggested a small compressor for this purpose. He had one in
his shop. I have no problem with getting a small compressor to make my
computers happy. It is just that my beloved and other folks working in the
offices would have extreme objections to a noisy, pancake compressor
starting up.

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air. I have a small vacuum
cleaner which will do an OK job cleaning. But I need some compressed air to
get everything really clean. I need something small, quiet and not scary to
tool phobic office workers (or wives). Any suggestions?

I was thinking of the baby compressors that run artist's air brushes. But
did not think they were powerful enough. Maybe even a fireplace bellows may
work. I looked at a small compressor from Harbor Freight and was assured
that it was very noisy. So that won't work. Maybe I am asking too much,
inexpensive, quiet and effective. Any input from you guys would be
appreciated.

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Old April 3rd 12, 07:42 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Off Topic: Compressors and Computers

In article m, "Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net wrote:
I had a computer go down last week. Turns out that the power supply was
clogged with dust and needed to be replaced.


Do you own a leafblower? It works very well on badly-encrusted computers.
Normally its easier than using an air compressor, as there's no waiting time
for the tank to fill.

Art
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Old April 3rd 12, 08:05 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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"Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net wrote in message
b.com...
I had a computer go down last week. Turns out that the power supply was
clogged with dust and needed to be replaced. It was probably under powered
too, which added to its demise. Talking to some friends, this has happened
to two more people in the last 3 months. All of them multi monitor
machines running some big apps. Regular computers did not seem to suffer
from the same type of problem.

The tech suggested regular cleaning of the interior of the case every two
months. Again, this is probably overkill for most machines, but we have
three examples here of where we probably could have prevented the problems
we had. He suggested a small compressor for this purpose. He had one in
his shop. I have no problem with getting a small compressor to make my
computers happy. It is just that my beloved and other folks working in
the offices would have extreme objections to a noisy, pancake compressor
starting up.

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air. I have a small
vacuum cleaner which will do an OK job cleaning. But I need some
compressed air to get everything really clean. I need something small,
quiet and not scary to tool phobic office workers (or wives). Any
suggestions?

I was thinking of the baby compressors that run artist's air brushes. But
did not think they were powerful enough. Maybe even a fireplace bellows
may work. I looked at a small compressor from Harbor Freight and was
assured that it was very noisy. So that won't work. Maybe I am asking
too much, inexpensive, quiet and effective. Any input from you guys would
be appreciated.


Could you not use a small, noisy compressor after folks have departed for
the day? Or give them a few quid to enjoy an extended lunch on a sunny
afternoon and then do the job whilst they are not present? Hey, take your
time guys. It's a beautiful day, go and enjoy yourselves, I'll look after
the shop whilst your gone. Bit of kudos for you to boot.

When using compressed air it is worth jamming all fans (PSU/CPU/Case etc) as
the high rotational speeds can knacker (sorry, an olde English term) these
fans. I know this to my cost.

HTH

Nick.
England.


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Old April 3rd 12, 08:17 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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"Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net wrote in message
b.com...
I had a computer go down last week. Turns out that the power supply was
clogged with dust and needed to be replaced. It was probably under powered
too, which added to its demise. Talking to some friends, this has happened
to two more people in the last 3 months. All of them multi monitor
machines running some big apps. Regular computers did not seem to suffer
from the same type of problem.

Snip


Any suggestions?

I was thinking of the baby compressors that run artist's air brushes. But
did not think they were powerful enough. Maybe even a fireplace bellows
may work. I looked at a small compressor from Harbor Freight and was
assured that it was very noisy. So that won't work. Maybe I am asking
too much, inexpensive, quiet and effective. Any input from you guys would
be appreciated.


I hope you take the computer out side to do this, not in the office blowing
all the stuff in the air to be drawn back into other computers. A tank
vacuum works. Put hose on output of tank. Large volume of air but low enough
pressure so as not to cause damage. WW




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Old April 3rd 12, 08:24 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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"Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net wrote in
b.com:

*snip*

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air. I have a small
vacuum cleaner which will do an OK job cleaning. But I need some
compressed air to get everything really clean. I need something
small, quiet and not scary to tool phobic office workers (or wives).
Any suggestions?

I was thinking of the baby compressors that run artist's air brushes.
But did not think they were powerful enough. Maybe even a fireplace
bellows may work. I looked at a small compressor from Harbor Freight
and was assured that it was very noisy. So that won't work. Maybe I
am asking too much, inexpensive, quiet and effective. Any input from
you guys would be appreciated.


I have an air brush compressor, and while it doesn't put out much air it
is quiet and would probably keep the computers clean enough if used on a
regular basis.

If the systems collect that much dust, though, would some sort of filter
be worthwhile? You'd probably have to add another fan or two, but
changing the filter on a regular basis might be easier than lugging a
compressor around.

One more idea... Put a regulator on a compressed air tank. Set it for
something reasonable (20-30 psi?) and pressurize the tank to 90-100 psi.
You can fill the tank in the shop and take it where needed.

Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.
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Old April 3rd 12, 08:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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"Lee Michaels" leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net writes:

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air.


Indeed. If your computer is in an environment where blowing it out
more than every 6 months is necessary, move the computer or clean up
the environment.

Compressor is way overkill.

A computer vacuum is nice, particularly for the keyboard.

scott
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Old April 3rd 12, 08:54 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On 4/3/2012 2:36 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
"Lee Michaels"leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net writes:

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air.


Indeed. If your computer is in an environment where blowing it out
more than every 6 months is necessary, move the computer or clean up
the environment.

Compressor is way overkill.


Disagree. I've used canned air several times on computers with marginal
results, then took a 40 PSI blow gun from a compressor to the very same
computer and blew out all kinds of residual crap that the canned air couldn't
touch.

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Old April 3rd 12, 09:09 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air. I have a small
vacuum cleaner which will do an OK job cleaning. But I need some
compressed air to get everything really clean. I need something small,
quiet and not scary to tool phobic office workers (or wives). Any
suggestions?


I think the can of compressed air is the standard solution, but I'm
allergic to it. I paid about $43 for a hand held 110v substitute which
works very well, but it louder than a hair dryer. I'm quite delighted
with the electric solution. I will find a link if anyone is interested
in the product.

Bill
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Old April 3rd 12, 09:12 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Steve Turner wrote:
On 4/3/2012 2:36 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
"Lee Michaels"leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net writes:

I could probably get by with a can of compressed air.


Indeed. If your computer is in an environment where blowing it out
more than every 6 months is necessary, move the computer or clean up
the environment.

Compressor is way overkill.


Disagree. I've used canned air several times on computers with marginal
results, then took a 40 PSI blow gun from a compressor to the very same
computer and blew out all kinds of residual crap that the canned air
couldn't touch.


There's a point at which you'll start blowing components off the boards.
I'm not sure where that point is and am not sure I'd want to find out
the hard way.


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