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Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

.... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino
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On 03/19/2012 06:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


Nice Greg.

Only a preference, but I think I'd have done vertical grain on the
cabinet sides, but since it's ply, it doesn't affect strength or anything.

- Doug


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gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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Doug Winterburn wrote in
eb.com:

On 03/19/2012 06:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as
relatively simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...-7215762775179
0027/lightbox/


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


Nice Greg.

Only a preference, but I think I'd have done vertical grain on the
cabinet sides, but since it's ply, it doesn't affect strength or
anything.

- Doug


It looks great to me!

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Best regards
Han
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On 3/19/2012 7:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Simplicity is often its own reward in functionality. You did mighty
fine. Execution is excellent.

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Last update: 4/15/2010
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
...
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec" denizens,
I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively simple as
this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


It looks great, but one thing. Could you please take another picture, and
adjust the camera for the lighting? Apparently, you got the settings for
either fluorescent or incandescent mixed up, hence the gold tone. An
accurate camera setting would give us a better shot at the color tone.

Steve




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On 3/19/2012 1:28 PM, Steve B wrote:
"Greg wrote in message
...
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec" denizens,
I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively simple as
this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


It looks great, but one thing. Could you please take another picture, and
adjust the camera for the lighting? Apparently, you got the settings for
either fluorescent or incandescent mixed up, hence the gold tone. An
accurate camera setting would give us a better shot at the color tone.

Steve


It's actually a little more complicated. There were two different kinds
of light on the desk. None of the WB setting seemed correct, so I left
the camera on Auto WB. I knew the color was off, but didn't want to take
the time to fix it. I may set up a sheet of white paper and do a custom
white balance if I get the time. In the meantime, here's a somewhat more
realistic rendition I took in the Garage.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


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On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.
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Looks great to me.

Judging yourself too harshly! It may be just another "thing", now,
but it's the trip that got you (and it) there.

Sonny
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 09:54:34 -0400, Greg Guarino
wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Hey, a hearty Well Done, Greg. Kudos on your accomplisment. That's a
far larger and more complicated project than most of us started with.

So, how do you like Waterlox now that you've used it? Other than the
smell (and it smells far, far better than Watco, lemme tell ya) I
simply adore it.

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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On Mar 19, 6:42*pm, Larry Jaques
wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 09:54:34 -0400, Greg Guarino
wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Hey, a hearty Well Done, Greg. *Kudos on your accomplisment. *That's a
far larger and more complicated project than most of us started with.


Well, it's not the very first thing I've done. In fact, I made the
cabinet boxes (sans doors) fifteen years ago. I cut them down about 6
inches for this project. I've also built and finished a couple of
wall-hung cubbyhole shelf units. And I've had a fair amount of
experience in home repair. It's a different pew, to be sure, but a
related denomination of church, at worst. The techniques may not
always be similar, but both require a problem-solving mindset.

That said, the desk is certainly the largest project so far, with the
most time-consuming finishing. And the panel doors were probably the
biggest challenge I've taken on yet. But as so often happens, I'm sure
I could build another set now in a fraction of the time and with fewer
errors. Except, of course, for the finishing.

The whole experience has given me more ideas than I have time for, but
I intend to keep at it when I can.

So, how do you like Waterlox now that you've used it? *Other than the
smell (and it smells far, far better than Watco, lemme tell ya) I
simply adore it.


I'll tell you some things I've learned for the next project. The most
important lesson seems to be wood selection. The waterlox on the oak
rails and stiles is probably the nicest finish I have yet
accomplished; smooth with a little gloss, but with no plastic-y
thickness. I used some garden-variety birch ply for the panels. The
contrast in color is nice, but the panel surface didn't give nearly as
nice a finish as the oak.


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On Mar 19, 9:54*am, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


I've asked a bunch of questions here and have gleaned quite a bit of
useful info from the 15 or so most prolific regulars. But my Flickr
(photo) account tells me that about 110 people viewed the photo linked
above today. Interesting.

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Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.

2. Your case sides grain are going the wrong way. Your grain should go
vertical. It looks weird going horizontal.

3. prefinish your panels before glue up so that the unfinished area
doesn't show during the winter when panels shrink. Yours are ply so not
really a problem. Also glue / flux brushes are not finish brushes.



On 3/19/2012 9:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino

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Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as
relatively simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


Don't ever feel that way Greg. There are (and have been in the past...)
some killer woodworkers here. Then, there have been some hacks (present
company included...) that can produce an occassional decent piece of work.
All though share a common interest in this activity and that's what it's
about. Some of us do some other things that aren't really even woodworking
related, but can sometimes offer insights - in the end, it's all just a
boy's club that's all about the fun of it. Well - except for Robert - he
has been showing some peculiar interests of late, so I'd advise you to watch
out for him...

--

-Mike-



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On 3/19/2012 9:36 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:
On Mar 19, 9:54 am, Greg wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


I've asked a bunch of questions here and have gleaned quite a bit of
useful info from the 15 or so most prolific regulars. But my Flickr
(photo) account tells me that about 110 people viewed the photo linked
above today. Interesting.


I suspect that is a small percentage of the people actually view these
post. Sometime I go for weeks with out posting then someone will post
something that catches my eye and I will follow the thread, posting when
appropriated.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
...

On Mar 19, 9:54 am, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


I've asked a bunch of questions here and have gleaned quite a bit of
useful info from the 15 or so most prolific regulars. But my Flickr
(photo) account tells me that about 110 people viewed the photo linked
above today. Interesting.
================================================== ===================================

I never read this group. As a matter of fact, I'm not here now.



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On Mar 19, 10:20*pm, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:
Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as
relatively simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Greg Guarino


Don't ever feel that way Greg. *There are (and have been in the past...)
some killer woodworkers here. *Then, there have been some hacks (present
company included...) that can produce an occassional decent piece of work..
All though share a common interest in this activity and that's what it's
about. *Some of us do some other things that aren't really even woodworking
related, but can sometimes offer insights - in the end, it's all just a
boy's club that's all about the fun of it. *Well - except for Robert - he
has been showing some peculiar interests of late, so I'd advise you to watch
out for him...


Don't worry. I am terribly proud of myself, and not just for the
result, but also for puzzling out solutions for each of the problems
that came up during the project. I think I have a pretty realistic
assessment of my skill level, and what I need to improve on. I've
learned a good bit recently, and I intend to use that learning to make
better mistakes in the future.

Thanks for the encouragement.

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tiredofspam wrote:


1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Please espline! Which picture reveals the splines you mentioned?


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On Mar 19, 10:16*pm, tiredofspam nospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines *grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.

2. Your case sides grain are going the wrong way. Your grain should go
vertical. It looks weird going horizontal.


I built that part a while back. Had I been doing it now I might have
chosen other wood entirely, but the horizontal grain itself doesn't
bother me.

3. prefinish your panels before glue up so that the unfinished area
doesn't show during the winter when panels shrink. Yours are ply so not
really a problem.


Yes indeed. That realization dawned on me as I was finishing the
doors. It was damn near impossible to get an even finish in the
corners. I will certainly follow that advice next time.

Also glue / flux brushes are not finish brushes.


I thank you for taking the time to delve that deeply into the photo
set.


On 3/19/2012 9:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:







Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Greg Guarino


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On Mar 19, 2:24*pm, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Nice attention to details! *I build lots of doors that way.


Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.
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On Mar 19, 4:22*pm, Sonny wrote:
Looks great to me.

Judging yourself too harshly! *It may be just another "thing", now,
but it's the trip that got you (and it) there.

Sonny


My Dad always said, "everything is easy once you know how". I try to
teach my daughter that too.


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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 18:33:29 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 6:42*pm, Larry Jaques
wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 09:54:34 -0400, Greg Guarino
wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Hey, a hearty Well Done, Greg. *Kudos on your accomplisment. *That's a
far larger and more complicated project than most of us started with.


Well, it's not the very first thing I've done. In fact, I made the
cabinet boxes (sans doors) fifteen years ago. I cut them down about 6
inches for this project. I've also built and finished a couple of
wall-hung cubbyhole shelf units. And I've had a fair amount of
experience in home repair. It's a different pew, to be sure, but a
related denomination of church, at worst. The techniques may not
always be similar, but both require a problem-solving mindset.


Pew? You can't say those common home-repair words in any church I've
been in.


That said, the desk is certainly the largest project so far, with the
most time-consuming finishing. And the panel doors were probably the
biggest challenge I've taken on yet. But as so often happens, I'm sure
I could build another set now in a fraction of the time and with fewer
errors. Except, of course, for the finishing.


Familiarity breeds content. (sorry for the pun)


The whole experience has given me more ideas than I have time for, but
I intend to keep at it when I can.


Grok that.


So, how do you like Waterlox now that you've used it? *Other than the
smell (and it smells far, far better than Watco, lemme tell ya) I
simply adore it.


I'll tell you some things I've learned for the next project. The most
important lesson seems to be wood selection. The waterlox on the oak
rails and stiles is probably the nicest finish I have yet
accomplished; smooth with a little gloss, but with no plastic-y
thickness. I used some garden-variety birch ply for the panels. The
contrast in color is nice, but the panel surface didn't give nearly as
nice a finish as the oak.


It's probably because of the lack of color to begin with. Several
more coats might impart a bit of amber to it. Practice on a spare
piece about 6" square. Save your wiping rag in a plastic baggie and
it'll last for a couple weeks. Leave the bag on the concrete (oily rag
hazard) and do a coat the first thing every morning or evening.

Did you remember to remove the air on top of the Waterlox so it
doesn't set hard on you? If not, do it RIGHT NOW! It might not be too
late... I lost half a quart can that way, but not the gallon!

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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CW wrote:


I never read this group. As a matter of fact, I'm not here now.


Phew! I don't see you and I was getting worried...

At least now I'm reassured - you're not here and I'm not seeing you. Or
something like that... Time for bed I think...

--

-Mike-



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Greg Guarino wrote:


Don't worry. I am terribly proud of myself, and not just for the
result, but also for puzzling out solutions for each of the problems
that came up during the project. I think I have a pretty realistic
assessment of my skill level, and what I need to improve on. I've
learned a good bit recently, and I intend to use that learning to make
better mistakes in the future.


Heh, heh, heh... "Better mistakes in the future...". This boy's got
promise! Pull up a chair Greg - I'll get someone to buy a beer for you.


Thanks for the encouragement.


Sure - it's a boy's club after all. We all need it. Well except for
Swingman...

--

-Mike-



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Greg Guarino wrote:
On Mar 19, 9:54 am, Greg Guarino wrote:
Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as
relatively simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Greg Guarino


I've asked a bunch of questions here and have gleaned quite a bit of
useful info from the 15 or so most prolific regulars. But my Flickr
(photo) account tells me that about 110 people viewed the photo
linked
above today. Interesting.


in most groups it's been my exprience there are just as many lurkers as
posters,sometimes more.
Depending on the friendliness of the groupg


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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:10:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 2:24*pm, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Nice attention to details! *I build lots of doors that way.


Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.


Explain how you did it, Greg. What's the config for holding the panel
in and allowing for expansion. Why the small gap between the rails
and stiles?

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg


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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:12:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 4:22*pm, Sonny wrote:
Looks great to me.

Judging yourself too harshly! *It may be just another "thing", now,
but it's the trip that got you (and it) there.


My Dad always said, "everything is easy once you know how". I try to
teach my daughter that too.


Precisely! Dad taught me that a scientific curiosity was my friend
and I started learning how -everything- worked from the get-go. It is
one of the most pleasurable aspects of my life.

Kudos on teaching that to your kids.

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:07:10 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 10:16*pm, tiredofspam nospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines *grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.


I -thought- I saw a 'wrong' spline there. If the grain direction is
the same as that of the stile (which I thought I saw) it can break
very easily, especially with the little gaps you had. Slam the door
hard once and it could be CURTAINS! G'luck!


2. Your case sides grain are going the wrong way. Your grain should go
vertical. It looks weird going horizontal.


I built that part a while back. Had I been doing it now I might have
chosen other wood entirely, but the horizontal grain itself doesn't
bother me.


It's all a matter of taste, but vertical is more frequently used.
I didn't even notice it.


3. prefinish your panels before glue up so that the unfinished area
doesn't show during the winter when panels shrink. Yours are ply so not
really a problem.


Yes indeed. That realization dawned on me as I was finishing the
doors. It was damn near impossible to get an even finish in the
corners. I will certainly follow that advice next time.


Prefinish the case pieces, too, so the glue doesn't squeeze out onto
the bare wood, keeping the finish from adhering and coloring the wood.
The bottom to side panel showed a couple of those in one pic.


Also glue / flux brushes are not finish brushes.


I thank you for taking the time to delve that deeply into the photo
set.


He's wrong there. Anything which can move finish into a corner is a
brush. Needle-nose pliers with a piece of t-shirt in their jaws,
q-tips, whatever's handy, but it has to be wiped, too.

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 23:25:02 -0400, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:

CW wrote:


I never read this group. As a matter of fact, I'm not here now.


We've known that for years, C-dub.


Phew! I don't see you and I was getting worried...

At least now I'm reassured - you're not here and I'm not seeing you. Or
something like that... Time for bed I think...


Gee, are you guys -that- close? knowing wink

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 23:25:02 -0400, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:

CW wrote:


I never read this group. As a matter of fact, I'm not here now.


We've known that for years, C-dub.
==================================================
LOL

Unfortunately, I have been in this wheelchair since last June and I can't
get into the shop (stairs and no ramp). The computer has been my main
pastime lately. Hopefully, that will change here in a few months. Every
experience is a learning experience if you look at it in the right way. I
now firmly believe that every architect should have to spend a couple of
months in a wheelchair before they can get their degree. Pulled into a
parking lot a while back and found the handicapped parking spaces right in
front of the entrance. Win. Wheelchair ramp on the other side of parking
lot. Fail. I don't use handicapped parking as I feel that there are others
that need them worse than I do but I do notice. Another place. Nice ramp
parallel to building leading to entrance. Win. Entrance door opens out
blocking ramp. Fail. Then we get to the inside. Deep pile carpeting. Like
rolling through mud. Halls so narrow that making a 90 degree turn into a
room is impossible. Many of these things could be taken care of in the
design process and without a great deal, or no, expense. Just a bit of
thought. BTW, if you are into a little entertainment in the "Holy crap. I
didn't think that was possible" area, go to YouTube and search for
"wheelchair backflip".

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On Mar 20, 1:42*am, Larry Jaques
wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:07:10 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

wrote:
On Mar 19, 10:16*pm, tiredofspam nospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.


1. Your Splines *grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.


I -thought- I saw a 'wrong' spline there. If the grain direction is
the same as that of the stile (which I thought I saw) it can break
very easily, especially with the little gaps you had. Slam the door
hard once and it could be CURTAINS! *G'luck!


The grain runs in the same direction as the stiles, vertically. See
below

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/

As for the gap, it's only on the first door I made. The splines were
tighter than they should have been, and I guess a little wider as
well. I fixed that problem (with a block plane) for the second door.




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On 3/19/2012 10:10 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:
On Mar 19, 2:24 pm, Leonlcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.


Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.


Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.


Sorry the detalis are not what I thought. ;~)

Very similar. Instead of splines I cut all the groves to receive the
panels in all of the rails and stiles 1/2" deep and the width of the
panel. Then I cut 1/2" long tenons on the ends of the rails to fit the
groves.
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On 3/20/2012 12:27 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:10:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 2:24 pm, Leonlcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.


Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.


Explain how you did it, Greg. What's the config for holding the panel
in and allowing for expansion. Why the small gap between the rails
and stiles?


Plywood panel, expansion is not going to be an issue. I believe the
gaps are simply chambered edges.



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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
...
On Mar 19, 10:16 pm, tiredofspam nospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.
___________


Just out of curiosity, why did you decide to use splines rather than cut
tongues on the ends of the rails?


--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico


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On 3/20/2012 8:05 AM, Leon wrote:
On 3/20/2012 12:27 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:10:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 2:24 pm, Leonlcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as
relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...


... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.

Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.


Explain how you did it, Greg. What's the config for holding the panel
in and allowing for expansion. Why the small gap between the rails
and stiles?


Plywood panel, expansion is not going to be an issue. I believe the gaps
are simply chambered edges.

They are indeed chamfered, but one of the doors does have a small gap in
at least one of the joints. I try to make an error here and there to
enhance the learning experience.

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On 3/20/2012 8:46 AM, dadiOH wrote:
"Greg wrote in message
...
On Mar 19, 10:16 pm, tiredofspamnospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.
___________


Just out of curiosity, why did you decide to use splines rather than cut
tongues on the ends of the rails?


I felt that it was more likely to fit within my skill set and tool
complement. For instance, there's only one "height" adjustment to be
made at the router table (for the slot cutter). My inexperience, coupled
with a pretty cheesy router table setup, might have made a precision
match between the tongue and groove difficult.

Having said that, I think I might go the T & G route the next time.



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On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 07:05:22 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet
wrote:

On 3/20/2012 12:27 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:10:21 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 19, 2:24 pm, Leonlcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:
On 3/19/2012 8:54 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Having marveled at the craftsmanship of some of the other "rec"
denizens, I feel a little sheepish "showing off" a project as relatively
simple as this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...t-721576277517...

... but hey, you have to start somewhere. Thanks for all the tips.

Nice attention to details! I build lots of doors that way.

Do you? With splines? It's funny; part of the impetus for this project
was to see if I could actually make a panel door. That had seemed like
a daunting task before. Now, less so.


Explain how you did it, Greg. What's the config for holding the panel
in and allowing for expansion. Why the small gap between the rails
and stiles?


Plywood panel, expansion is not going to be an issue.


Bueno.

I believe the gaps are simply chambered edges.


I saw the chamfers, but it looked like gaps, too, all the way down to
the splines. Maybe it was the lighting.

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 03:18:40 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 20, 1:42*am, Larry Jaques
wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:07:10 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

wrote:
On Mar 19, 10:16*pm, tiredofspam nospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.


1. Your Splines *grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.


I -thought- I saw a 'wrong' spline there. If the grain direction is
the same as that of the stile (which I thought I saw) it can break
very easily, especially with the little gaps you had. Slam the door
hard once and it could be CURTAINS! *G'luck!


The grain runs in the same direction as the stiles, vertically. See
below

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


Oops, not the safest way. Those look to be 1/4" rather than 1/8".
Better.


As for the gap, it's only on the first door I made. The splines were
tighter than they should have been, and I guess a little wider as
well. I fixed that problem (with a block plane) for the second door.


Goodgood.

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 01:59:52 -0700, "CW" wrote:



"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
.. .

On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 23:25:02 -0400, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:

CW wrote:


I never read this group. As a matter of fact, I'm not here now.


We've known that for years, C-dub.
================================================= =
LOL

Unfortunately, I have been in this wheelchair since last June and I can't
get into the shop (stairs and no ramp).


That sucks. Roll on over to HFT and get one of the little winches and
set up a system to lower yourself down there, boy!


The computer has been my main
pastime lately. Hopefully, that will change here in a few months. Every
experience is a learning experience if you look at it in the right way. I
now firmly believe that every architect should have to spend a couple of
months in a wheelchair before they can get their degree. Pulled into a
parking lot a while back and found the handicapped parking spaces right in
front of the entrance. Win. Wheelchair ramp on the other side of parking
lot. Fail. I don't use handicapped parking as I feel that there are others
that need them worse than I do but I do notice. Another place. Nice ramp
parallel to building leading to entrance. Win. Entrance door opens out
blocking ramp. Fail. Then we get to the inside. Deep pile carpeting. Like
rolling through mud. Halls so narrow that making a 90 degree turn into a
room is impossible. Many of these things could be taken care of in the
design process and without a great deal, or no, expense. Just a bit of
thought.


Right. And doctors should have to roll in them for a week, too, during
their mandatory hospital stay, so they can see how it feels from that
angle. It won't change many, but the few it does will be well worth
it. (see William Hurt in "The Doctor", ca 1991. Excellent!)


BTW, if you are into a little entertainment in the "Holy crap. I
didn't think that was possible" area, go to YouTube and search for
"wheelchair backflip".


Har! I'll go do that now as I have some time. My 10am client called
and her power's out so I can't work. Wow, Aaron tooks some nasty
dumps in the first part of the flick. I wonder how much replacement
high-performance wheelchairs cost for him every few months... He has
the right attitude, doesn't he?

--
When you are kind to someone in trouble, you hope they'll remember
and be kind to someone else. And it'll become like a wildfire.
-- Whoopi Goldberg
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Greg Guarino wrote:
On 3/20/2012 8:46 AM, dadiOH wrote:
"Greg wrote in message
...
On Mar 19, 10:16 pm, tiredofspamnospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during
this build.

1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want
this to provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90
degrees to what you have them.


Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in
this application as is.
___________


Just out of curiosity, why did you decide to use splines rather than
cut tongues on the ends of the rails?


I felt that it was more likely to fit within my skill set and tool
complement. For instance, there's only one "height" adjustment to be
made at the router table (for the slot cutter). My inexperience,
coupled with a pretty cheesy router table setup, might have made a
precision match between the tongue and groove difficult.

Having said that, I think I might go the T & G route the next time.


Cut the tenons on a saw, not with a router. Easier & better.

--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico



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On 3/20/2012 12:45 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 03:18:40 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino
wrote:

On Mar 20, 1:42 am, Larry
wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:07:10 -0700 (PDT), Greg Guarino

wrote:
On Mar 19, 10:16 pm, tiredofspamnospam.nospam.com wrote:
Please take these constructively. I'm sure you learned a lot during this
build.

1. Your Splines grain is going in the wrong direction. You want this to
provide extra support, so you set the grain to go 90 degrees to what you
have them.

Hadn't thought of that. I can see now how the strength of the spline
would be greater "your" way, but I think it should be adequate in this
application as is.

I -thought- I saw a 'wrong' spline there. If the grain direction is
the same as that of the stile (which I thought I saw) it can break
very easily, especially with the little gaps you had. Slam the door
hard once and it could be CURTAINS! G'luck!


The grain runs in the same direction as the stiles, vertically. See
below

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguari...0027/lightbox/


Oops, not the safest way.


By which you mean the small block of oak and the fingers near the miter
saw blade? I guess you're right. I am pretty cautious though, especially
as one of my other uses for my fingers is at the piano (a much more
advanced skill than woodworking, with better cash-flow too)

Those look to be 1/4" rather than 1/8".
Better.


The grooves are 7/32 and splines fit snugly (one might say "tightly" on
the first door)

As for the gap, it's only on the first door I made. The splines were
tighter than they should have been, and I guess a little wider as
well. I fixed that problem (with a block plane) for the second door.


Goodgood.


What, you didn't make it to that photo ("shaving down splines")? Eight
of the 200 people who viewed the finished desk made it all the way
through the set.

I'm something of a photo buff too. I've been amusing myself documenting
the project. Some of the "dramatic" lighting was courtesy of a couple of
reflector work lights.
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