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Old December 18th 11, 05:06 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

I am going to be painting a cabinet I bought with Benjamin Moore
interior semi-gloss latex paint. The cabinet is made of Baltic Birch
plywood and Poplar.

I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


1. Zinnser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Water-base Primer
(advantage is easy-clean up but worried about water-based)

2. Zinnser BIN Shellac-Base Primer
(will shellac-base be less likely to raise grain? But it's marketing
seems more targeted at stain-killing)

3. Standard latex-based primer (e.g., Benjamin Moore)

4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)

5. Oil-based primer? (Do they still exist? I have seen it for exterior
where it is recommended for Cedar but not for interior recently)

6. Suck it up and sand after priming? It's good for you...

7. Other suggestion?


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Old December 18th 11, 05:12 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On 12/18/2011 10:06 AM, blueman wrote:
I am going to be painting a cabinet I bought with Benjamin Moore
interior semi-gloss latex paint. The cabinet is made of Baltic Birch
plywood and Poplar.

I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)


y preference ... primer not necessary.

7. Other suggestion?


Followed by a light sanding ... if you're going to the trouble, do it right.


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Old December 18th 11, 05:51 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On Sun, 18 Dec 2011 11:06:02 -0500, blueman wrote:




I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


Anything with water is likely to raise the grain.

No matter what I use, I give a light sanding after the first coat
anyway. IMO, you are more likely to get a better finish.


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Old December 18th 11, 07:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On Sun, 18 Dec 2011 10:12:49 -0600, Swingman wrote:

4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)


y preference ... primer not necessary.


Same here. Zinsser SealCoat or dewaxed from flakes.

But be *very* *sure* it's dewaxed!

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Old December 18th 11, 07:42 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On 12/18/2011 10:06 AM, blueman wrote:
I am going to be painting a cabinet I bought with Benjamin Moore
interior semi-gloss latex paint. The cabinet is made of Baltic Birch
plywood and Poplar.

I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


1. Zinnser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Water-base Primer
(advantage is easy-clean up but worried about water-based)



I have done a lot of oil based and water based painting. Oil based
painting clean up is MUCH easier than water based clean up. Mineral
spirits cleans instantly, I wish I could say that for soap and water.


2. Zinnser BIN Shellac-Base Primer
(will shellac-base be less likely to raise grain? But it's marketing
seems more targeted at stain-killing)

3. Standard latex-based primer (e.g., Benjamin Moore)

4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)

5. Oil-based primer? (Do they still exist? I have seen it for exterior
where it is recommended for Cedar but not for interior recently)

6. Suck it up and sand after priming? It's good for you...


Not a bad idea if you do go with water based. That sanding step to get
rid of the raised grain is very light and quick.

ALSO if you use a water based latex paint for a book case, buy the
absolute best quality you can get. Do not assume that a particular
brand will offer the best in all of its products. Typically average
water based paints tale a long tome to cure and will be sticky/stick to
anything that you might set on it. Oil alkyd based paints cure much
harder and quickly. I have a new home painted with water based Sherwin
William paint on the trim. 1 year later the surface is harder but
things still stick to it.





7. Other suggestion?




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Old December 18th 11, 08:10 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

"blueman" wrote in message
...
I am going to be painting a cabinet I bought with Benjamin Moore
interior semi-gloss latex paint. The cabinet is made of Baltic Birch
plywood and Poplar.

I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


1. Zinnser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Water-base Primer
(advantage is easy-clean up but worried about water-based)

2. Zinnser BIN Shellac-Base Primer
(will shellac-base be less likely to raise grain? But it's marketing
seems more targeted at stain-killing)

3. Standard latex-based primer (e.g., Benjamin Moore)

4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)

5. Oil-based primer? (Do they still exist? I have seen it for exterior
where it is recommended for Cedar but not for interior recently)

6. Suck it up and sand after priming? It's good for you...

7. Other suggestion?


BIN is simply white pigmented shellac so you can use BIN or unpigmented
shellac as a sealer / primer. I prefer BIN since it provides me with a
white "canvas". Just make sure that if you use shellac, it is dewaxed.
Sealcoat is already dewaxed.
Any solvent will raise the grain but some do it to a much lesser extent.
In general, water raises it the most followed by alcohols followed by
hydrocarbons which raise it the least.
I appreciate that you do not want to sand before applying top coats but
you will always get a better finished product if you do so. Perhaps only
sand the most visible parts of the cabinet.

Good Luck


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Old December 18th 11, 09:12 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On Dec 18, 10:06*am, blueman wrote:

2. Zinnser BIN Shellac-Base Primer
* *(will shellac-base be less likely to raise grain? But it's marketing
* *seems more targeted at stain-killing)


Once I discovered how easy this stuff is to use, i have never looked
back. I spray it, and unless I get a nib or two, I don't sand.
However, if it is hand applied, I always sand just a bit to get the
last of the brush strokes out.

BIN is simply dewaxed, shellac with zinc oxide ( I believe ) suspended
in it. It provides good stain killing properties, but the bonus is
that the resulting surface is more grippy than plain shellac.


6. Suck it up and sand after priming? It's good for you...


If hand applied, you bet.

Robert
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Old December 19th 11, 02:14 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

I would not use a latex paint on cupboards. It stays tender forever.


"blueman" wrote in message
...
I am going to be painting a cabinet I bought with Benjamin Moore
interior semi-gloss latex paint. The cabinet is made of Baltic Birch
plywood and Poplar.

I want to avoid raising the grain on the cabinet when I apply
primer and having to sand everything again. Which of the following
priming techniquest are least likely to raise grain.


1. Zinnser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Water-base Primer
(advantage is easy-clean up but worried about water-based)

2. Zinnser BIN Shellac-Base Primer
(will shellac-base be less likely to raise grain? But it's marketing
seems more targeted at stain-killing)

3. Standard latex-based primer (e.g., Benjamin Moore)

4. Shellac as a sealcoat +/- followed by primer (is primer necessary if
you have a shellac sealcoat?)

5. Oil-based primer? (Do they still exist? I have seen it for exterior
where it is recommended for Cedar but not for interior recently)

6. Suck it up and sand after priming? It's good for you...

7. Other suggestion?



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Old December 19th 11, 01:28 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On 12/18/2011 7:14 PM, Pat wrote:
I would not use a latex paint on cupboards. It stays tender forever.


That would coincide with the quality of latex paint you use. Better
latex paints cure much harder more quickly.

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Old December 19th 11, 03:11 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Best primer to avoid raising the grain...

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 06:28:13 -0600, Leon [email protected]
That would coincide with the quality of latex paint you use. Better
latex paints cure much harder more quickly.


I've recently come to that conclusion too. Only one question. How does
one determine which latex paints are of higher quality? I haven't seen
too many reviews of latex paint.


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