Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 02:48 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 798
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank

I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.

Harbor Freight for example sells an 11 gallon portable air tank
(http://www.harborfreight.com/11-gall...ank-65595.html)
for about $38. It is rated up to 125 psi (same as my compressor) and
comes with a gauge and a tire-type fitting.

I was thinking that I could re-plumb to NPT and attach it to the drain
hole on my compressor tank (with a T-fitting and ball valve to still
allow drainage).

This would then give me effectively 19 gallons of initial air supply.

Of course, I would need to be careful about duty cycle since filling up
19 gallons vs. 8 gallons would be like doing 2 1/2 continuous fills of
my original tank.

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable way
to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses where
I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?

(Note that it seems that several of the Harbor Freight compressors use
the same HP motor with similar CFM ratings for a range of tank sizes --
probably because the HP is ultimately limited by the 110V 15A supply
circuit)

Thanks!

  #2   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 03:36 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2011
Posts: 1
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to giveequivalent bigger tank

Don't know if that is possible. I don't know who makes that Harbor
Freight that you have, but if they have a U.S. number, I would call them
and talk to them about doing that. Or talk to someone local that knows
air compressor's and could guide you on that.

Paul T.


On Sun, 23 Oct 2011 20:48:18 -0400, blueman wrote:

I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.

Harbor Freight for example sells an 11 gallon portable air tank
(http://www.harborfreight.com/11-gall...ank-65595.html)
for about $38. It is rated up to 125 psi (same as my compressor) and
comes with a gauge and a tire-type fitting.

I was thinking that I could re-plumb to NPT and attach it to the drain
hole on my compressor tank (with a T-fitting and ball valve to still
allow drainage).

This would then give me effectively 19 gallons of initial air supply.

Of course, I would need to be careful about duty cycle since filling up
19 gallons vs. 8 gallons would be like doing 2 1/2 continuous fills of
my original tank.

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable way
to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses where
I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?

(Note that it seems that several of the Harbor Freight compressors use
the same HP motor with similar CFM ratings for a range of tank sizes --
probably because the HP is ultimately limited by the 110V 15A supply
circuit)

Thanks!


  #3   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 04:06 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 10,053
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalentbigger tank

On 10/23/2011 7:48 PM, blueman wrote:

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.


Had an add-on tank for a long time but recently gave it away when I
moved to a smaller shop. I never found it to be much of a practical
advantage, all things considered.

Hardly noticeable, AAMOF.

YMMV ...

--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious)
http://gplus.to/eWoodShop
  #4   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 04:16 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 619
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank


"blueman" wrote in message
...
I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.

Harbor Freight for example sells an 11 gallon portable air tank
(http://www.harborfreight.com/11-gall...ank-65595.html)
for about $38. It is rated up to 125 psi (same as my compressor) and
comes with a gauge and a tire-type fitting.

I was thinking that I could re-plumb to NPT and attach it to the drain
hole on my compressor tank (with a T-fitting and ball valve to still
allow drainage).

This would then give me effectively 19 gallons of initial air supply.

Of course, I would need to be careful about duty cycle since filling up
19 gallons vs. 8 gallons would be like doing 2 1/2 continuous fills of
my original tank.

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable way
to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses where
I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?

(Note that it seems that several of the Harbor Freight compressors use
the same HP motor with similar CFM ratings for a range of tank sizes --
probably because the HP is ultimately limited by the 110V 15A supply
circuit)

Thanks!


Your logic and reasoning are just fine. Go ahead and add an
external tank, it shouldn't harm your existing unit.
Art


  #5   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 04:32 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 10,799
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank

On Sun, 23 Oct 2011 20:48:18 -0400, blueman wrote:

I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.


There are numerous ways to pipe the tank in line. Your reasoning is
correct, you get the initial burst, but that is all.

I'd pipe it in, but I'd put a valve in the line to shut it off. Two
reasons for that. There is no good reason to fill that tank if you
are not going to need the backup of air. Saves both time and energy
at startup for normal work.

Second, you can fill it, close the valve, and have it ready for use.
You can also open the valve and use that air if you only need a little
shot of it and not have to start the compressor.


  #6   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 04:36 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 5,723
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank

P.H. T. wrote:
Don't know if that is possible. I don't know who makes that Harbor
Freight that you have, but if they have a U.S. number, I would call
them and talk to them about doing that. Or talk to someone local that
knows air compressor's and could guide you on that.

Paul T.



Yes - it is very possible. Why would anyone respond with "I don't know if
that is possible"? Hell - better to watch the responses and see. Possible
is one thing - probable is quite another.

--

-Mike-



  #7   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 04:40 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2008
Posts: 5,723
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank

Artemus wrote:


Your logic and reasoning are just fine. Go ahead and add an
external tank, it shouldn't harm your existing unit.
Art


Will not harm it, but will it help him - which is what he asked? For me - I
do not know. I understand about cascadde units that do this kind of thing,
but I don't understand the demand requirements of those cascades. So far -
not a single reply has offered any real knowledge to the OP's question...

--

-Mike-



  #8   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 05:39 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2011
Posts: 10,503
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalentbigger tank

On 10/23/2011 7:48 PM, blueman wrote:
I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.

Harbor Freight for example sells an 11 gallon portable air tank
(http://www.harborfreight.com/11-gall...ank-65595.html)
for about $38. It is rated up to 125 psi (same as my compressor) and
comes with a gauge and a tire-type fitting.

I was thinking that I could re-plumb to NPT and attach it to the drain
hole on my compressor tank (with a T-fitting and ball valve to still
allow drainage).

This would then give me effectively 19 gallons of initial air supply.

Of course, I would need to be careful about duty cycle since filling up
19 gallons vs. 8 gallons would be like doing 2 1/2 continuous fills of
my original tank.

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable way
to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses where
I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?

(Note that it seems that several of the Harbor Freight compressors use
the same HP motor with similar CFM ratings for a range of tank sizes --
probably because the HP is ultimately limited by the 110V 15A supply
circuit)

Thanks!


If you are talking about blowing out a sprinkler system I doubt the
capacity you are gaining will help. Long ago I had a 80 gallon tank
with a small pump, I could empty it in about 15 seconds when blowing a
lot of air. My nephew used to be in the sprinkler business and rented a
commercial compressor for blowing out the systems.
  #9   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 06:26 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,565
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank

blueman wrote in
:

I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90
psi.


*snip*

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable
way to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses
where I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?


*snip*


Thanks!


Where it might make a difference is in air hungry intermittent duty
tools like air wrenches. The extra reserve of air would allow the tool
to run longer (perhaps enough to finish the job) before the compressor
kicks on.

If you do this, make sure to open the compressor regulator to charge the
tank fully and then put another regulator before the tool connection.
If all you charge the tank with is 30 psi, you won't see much difference
at all. Charge to 100 or 120 psi and you'll notice the difference.

Puckdropper
  #10   Report Post  
Old October 24th 11, 09:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,230
Default Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to giveequivalent bigger tank

On Oct 23, 5:48*pm, blueman wrote:
I have a low-end Harbor Freight 8 gallon air compressor that has many
times over earned its $100 cost.

However, there are times when I would like to have a larger air supply
tank such as when I am blowing out my irrigation system. Of course the
steady-state is limited by the compressor motor to about 4-5 CFM@90 psi.

But I was wondering whether I could extend at least the initial volume
by adding an additional tank.

Harbor Freight for example *sells an 11 gallon portable air tank
(http://www.harborfreight.com/11-gall...ank-65595.html)
for about $38. It is rated up to 125 psi (same as my compressor) and
comes with a gauge and a tire-type fitting.

I was thinking that I could re-plumb to NPT and attach it to the drain
hole on my compressor tank (with a T-fitting and ball valve to still
allow drainage).

This would then give me effectively 19 gallons of initial air supply.

Of course, I would need to be careful about duty cycle since filling up
19 gallons vs. 8 gallons would be like doing 2 1/2 continuous fills of
my original tank.

But assuming that I am careful about duty cycle is this a reasonable way
to temporarily extend the initial air supply for occassional uses where
I need to get the advantages of a larger tank?

(Note that it seems that several of the Harbor Freight compressors use
the same HP motor with similar CFM ratings for a range of tank sizes --
probably because the HP is ultimately limited by the 110V 15A supply
circuit)

Thanks!


Yes, your idea will be useful in application you describe (blow out
sprinkler system)

I did some "back of the envelop" calcs.

Assuming a sprinkler zone has about 100ft of 3/4" PVC pipe & zone's
total flow is about 15 gpm.

Charge your compressed air tanks to maximum pressure
but I'd recommend using a pressure regulator in the supply hose to the
sprinkler system.....set at no higher than 50 psi.

PVC piping is not meant to be used with compressed air.. ...... there
is a danger of brittle failure.
Safety glasses & cleared area are highly recommended.

Your original compressor setup will blow out a single zone for about
25 secs ....kinda short.

Add the 11 gallon tank & bump your total storage to 19 gallons, you
can blow out a single zone for about 70 secs.
Two blown outs per zone should do the trick.

I'd plumb the tanks together with 1/2" pipe minimum and use Ed'
suggestion of a valve between the tanks.
You can use the valve to select total compressed air volume and
control duty cycle.

cheers
Bob


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Would adding a 5 or 10 gallon portable tank to my compressor be helpful? blueman Woodworking 11 February 17th 10 12:26 AM
convert old compressor tank to portable air storage tank? Nate Nagel Home Repair 17 September 27th 09 06:43 PM
Adding air to a well tank - HOW MUCH? hsullivan@none.com Home Repair 4 January 2nd 08 03:21 AM
is a 2 tank compressor better than a 1 tank compressor? em@esn.net Home Repair 8 April 14th 07 07:45 AM
Blown compressor tank RoyJ Metalworking 49 May 26th 06 10:46 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017