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  #1   Report Post  
Paul Kierstead
 
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Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop
made zero clearance insert on my table saw with a splitter. It is
carefully leveled with set screws and a reasonably tight fit.

Apparently not tight enough. I rose the blade up fairly high (close to
the max for the insert with my blade truing disk), and started the saw.
Now my saw gives a pretty good jolt when it fires up. I watched in slow
motion as the insert lept up, caught the blade and fired forward in a
blur.

Unfortunately I was in the path of the insert. It caught me in the
groin; luckily right in the musle where leg joins the groin. It is gonna
be a helluva bruise and makes getting around somewhat painful. Very
luckily I missed the "important parts". SWMBO get real nervous now when
I use the TS. She is worried about the good bits. If I got hit in the
head she wouldn't have cared

Lessons learned:
- Add a set screw the back to ensure the insert is a very tight fit
- Stay out of the path of the insert when starting the saw. This is
actually odd that I would be there; I am a right and the switch is on
the left. For some reason I started it with my left hand anyway.

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone), but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.
  #2   Report Post  
Mike Hide
 
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Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2



"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message
news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone), but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.


  #3   Report Post  
xrongor
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

good idea for sure about the screw.

man thats a scary story cause it could have easily happened to me..

randy

"Mike Hide" wrote in message
news:PXP7c.65413$KO3.219609@attbi_s02...
put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when

the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2



"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message
news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone), but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.




  #4   Report Post  
Mark & Juanita
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

In article PXP7c.65413$KO3.219609@attbi_s02,
says...
put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2


You might want to clarify what you mean by front and back of the
insert. The way it makes sense (to me, I could be wrong) is that you
mean the front of the insert to be at the back (outfeed side) of the
tablesaw and blade, this is where inserting a screw will prevent the
insert from rising up. The back of the insert is at the front of the
tablesaw (infeed side), I can't see where putting a screw here would do
other than provide a prolonged pivot point for an already rising insert.
OTOH, if you put the screw at the back of the TS, then raising the
insert at the infeed end of the saw will be required to remove the
insert. I think this is what you meant, is my understanding correct?

At least that's where I put the screw on my inserts, it also matches
the tabs on the factory inserts.




"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message
news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone), but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.



  #5   Report Post  
Mike Hide
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

I meant the front of the insert to be the part that is fathest from the
operator, at the out feed end. As my unisaw is ,you lift the insert via a
hole in it nearest the operator and then extract it by pulling it up and
towards you....mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
"Mark & Juanita" wrote in message
s.com...
In article PXP7c.65413$KO3.219609@attbi_s02,
says...
put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when

the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert

cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2


You might want to clarify what you mean by front and back of the
insert. The way it makes sense (to me, I could be wrong) is that you
mean the front of the insert to be at the back (outfeed side) of the
tablesaw and blade, this is where inserting a screw will prevent the
insert from rising up. The back of the insert is at the front of the
tablesaw (infeed side), I can't see where putting a screw here would do
other than provide a prolonged pivot point for an already rising insert.
OTOH, if you put the screw at the back of the TS, then raising the
insert at the infeed end of the saw will be required to remove the
insert. I think this is what you meant, is my understanding correct?

At least that's where I put the screw on my inserts, it also matches
the tabs on the factory inserts.




"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message

news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone),

but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.






  #6   Report Post  
Joe Wilding
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

This is absolutley correct. The screw should be on the outfeed side of
the blade. In this portion of the insert, the blade is rising, tending
to push up on the insert. Like Mark said, this is where the protrusion
is located on factory inserts.

Joe in Denver
My Woodworking Website:
www.the-wildings.com/shop/



Mark & Juanita wrote in message ws.com...
In article PXP7c.65413$KO3.219609@attbi_s02,
says...
put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2


You might want to clarify what you mean by front and back of the
insert. The way it makes sense (to me, I could be wrong) is that you
mean the front of the insert to be at the back (outfeed side) of the
tablesaw and blade, this is where inserting a screw will prevent the
insert from rising up. The back of the insert is at the front of the
tablesaw (infeed side), I can't see where putting a screw here would do
other than provide a prolonged pivot point for an already rising insert.
OTOH, if you put the screw at the back of the TS, then raising the
insert at the infeed end of the saw will be required to remove the
insert. I think this is what you meant, is my understanding correct?

At least that's where I put the screw on my inserts, it also matches
the tabs on the factory inserts.




"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message
news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone), but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.



  #7   Report Post  
Toller
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

I have a screw at the front side of the table because that is where the
table is made to take a screw. Obviously it would be more effective at the
back, so I have a steel tab at the back, screwed to the insert. It rotates
around to hold the insert in. I don't often bother with it, but might in
the future.



  #8   Report Post  
Paul Kierstead
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

In article VLS7c.65100$_w.1015752@attbi_s53,
"Mike Hide" wrote:

I meant the front of the insert to be the part that is fathest from the
operator, at the out feed end. As my unisaw is ,you lift the insert via a
hole in it nearest the operator and then extract it by pulling it up and
towards you....mjh


Thanks for your -- and the others who commented -- suggestion! My next
insert will have one. Once is enough to convince me. Incidently, my
factory insert does not have such a feature, although it does have a set
screw in the front (ok, my front, nearest to the operator) to tighten it
up. A screw at the back is much more sensible.
  #9   Report Post  
Mike Hide
 
Posts: n/a
Default Zero clearance insert fights back.

point taken Mark ,thanks for the clarification....mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
"Mark & Juanita" wrote in message
s.com...
In article PXP7c.65413$KO3.219609@attbi_s02,
says...
put a small screw orotruding under the front of the insert, so when when

the
insert is in place the screw is under the table.That way the insert

cannot
be lifed out by the blade only by you . Removing it requires lifting the
rear of the insert, pivoting it, and pulling it towards you . ...mjh

--
http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2


You might want to clarify what you mean by front and back of the
insert. The way it makes sense (to me, I could be wrong) is that you
mean the front of the insert to be at the back (outfeed side) of the
tablesaw and blade, this is where inserting a screw will prevent the
insert from rising up. The back of the insert is at the front of the
tablesaw (infeed side), I can't see where putting a screw here would do
other than provide a prolonged pivot point for an already rising insert.
OTOH, if you put the screw at the back of the TS, then raising the
insert at the infeed end of the saw will be required to remove the
insert. I think this is what you meant, is my understanding correct?

At least that's where I put the screw on my inserts, it also matches
the tabs on the factory inserts.




"Paul Kierstead" wrote in message

news
Sigh, I hate it when the safety devices fight back. I had a nice shop

snip

I am happy to be essentially unhurt (little pain never hurt anyone),

but
perhaps this could be cautionary for someone else.




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