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How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter).

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and squares.
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. :-) I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill


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sam wrote:
In article ,
says...
How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter).

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and squares.
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. :-) I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill


I really like these Bent and Bros captain's chairs. I bought
one for 40 bucks. It's worn, but it's in great shape. I'm
going to use it as a pattern. I figure after the fourth or fifth
chair, I'll start getting somewhat good at making them.

http://tinyurl.com/ybbw45a

Bent and Bros went out of business a few years back. They used
to make the university chairs. Someone else makes them now.

s


My wife came home with a truckload of chairs similar to that in the
summer. They were an exact match to something from her family that she'd
like me to repair. I've repaired things, but never a wood chair. It's a
winter project, and from what I've read, there's a bit of technique to
getting them back together properly, especially since they're broken. I
hear Lew's epoxy calling me.

Tanus
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"Tanus" wrote in message ...
sam wrote:
In article ,
says...
How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or
intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most
readers here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that
matter).

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and
squares.
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. :-) I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill


I really like these Bent and Bros captain's chairs. I bought
one for 40 bucks. It's worn, but it's in great shape. I'm going to use it
as a pattern. I figure after the fourth or fifth
chair, I'll start getting somewhat good at making them.

http://tinyurl.com/ybbw45a


Nice looking chair. It appears that many of the pieces were turned.
If you factor out the lathe, then you may end up with a chair you won't be
afraid to get saw dust on! : )


Bent and Bros went out of business a few years back. They used
to make the university chairs. Someone else makes them now.

s


My wife came home with a truckload of chairs similar to that in the
summer. They were an exact match to something from her family that she'd
like me to repair. I've repaired things, but never a wood chair. It's a
winter project, and from what I've read, there's a bit of technique to
getting them back together properly, especially since they're broken. I
hear Lew's epoxy calling me.


That job probably calls for some of his best clamps too!!

Bill


Tanus



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Bill wrote:
How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter).


http://www.e-woodshop.net/Projects10.htm

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
KarlC@ (the obvious)


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Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it


I would tend to agree with that. I like building (all wood, only) a
certain "style" of rocking chair and other relaxing type seating, in
general, (patio/porch swings). I try to avoid straight line edges and
sharp corners.... Like a good, fetching woman: the mo curves, the mo
betta! There are a few samples in this group: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/

I like repairing any kind of chair/seating.

Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote in message
...
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it


I would tend to agree with that. I like building (all wood, only) a
certain "style" of rocking chair and other relaxing type seating, in
general, (patio/porch swings). I try to avoid straight line edges and
sharp corners.... Like a good, fetching woman: the mo curves, the mo
betta! There are a few samples in this group:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/

I like repairing any kind of chair/seating.

Sonny


You're a productive person. Nice work!

Bill


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Chairs, in some ways are the pinnacle of woodworking. Subtle
variations in gemetry of design can make them comfortable or not. They
require perfectly executed joinery to withstand the enormous racking
pressures they will experience when in service and the geometry of the
joinery and shaped parts can represent a real challenge.

Gustav Stickley, Sam Maloof, the Windsor chair, all legends.

A nobel venture for sure.

On Dec 22, 1:53*pm, "Bill" wrote:
How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter)..

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and squares..
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. *:-) * I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill


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Default Chair


"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message
...
Chairs, in some ways are the pinnacle of woodworking. Subtle
variations in gemetry of design can make them comfortable or not. They
require perfectly executed joinery to withstand the enormous racking
pressures they will experience when in service and the geometry of the
joinery and shaped parts can represent a real challenge.

Gustav Stickley, Sam Maloof, the Windsor chair, all legends.

-----------------

I just looked up Gustav Stickley. I wish to share the following remark of
his (from "The Craftsman") just in case you may find it an enjoyable frame
of perspective as I did.

"There are elements of intrinsic beauty in the simplification of a house
built on the log cabin idea. First, there is the bare beauty of the logs
themselves with their long lines and firm curves. Then there is the open
charm felt of the structural features which are not hidden under plaster and
ornament, but are clearly revealed, a charm felt in Japanese
architecture....The quiet rhythmic monotone of the wall of logs fills one
with the rustic peace of a secluded nook in the woods."

Now, get back to work! : )

Bill



On Dec 22, 1:53 pm, "Bill" wrote:
How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or
intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most
readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter).

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and squares.
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. :-) I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill



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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 16:53:27 -0500, "Bill"
wrote:

How many of you have a chair or stool in your shop that you built or intend
to build one someday (it seems like it would be a satisfying project)?
Seems like the choice of one's design might say something about
the person who built it (sort of reminds me of tool boxes, but most readers
here
probably know more about them than I do--and chairs too, for that matter).

I'm the same poster that started a thread on hammers, levels, and squares.
I guess I am drawn towards simplicity. :-) I think I would design a
simple,
functional chair, striving to avoid a result that looked like it better
belonged
in the kitchen or dining room, but more improved than a spoke-shaved
stump...
It's sort of fun to think about.

Happy holidays,
Bill



Although I'm stqanding 90% of the time I use a fullly-adjustable
drafting chair in my shop whenever I want to sit. The drafting chair
broke 10 years ago but I found a welder to do the job for just $10.

I have built several chairs, but none for my shop. Certainly building
a chair is a big challenge--lots of strange angles, curves, wood
steaming, and the finished project will be subject to large forces.
Also, there are plenty of chair-building tools. I have not (yet)
attempted a Windsor chair, something I always wanted to build.


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On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 02:05:19 -0500, the infamous "Bill"
scrawled the following:


"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message
...
Chairs, in some ways are the pinnacle of woodworking. Subtle
variations in gemetry of design can make them comfortable or not. They
require perfectly executed joinery to withstand the enormous racking
pressures they will experience when in service and the geometry of the
joinery and shaped parts can represent a real challenge.

Gustav Stickley, Sam Maloof, the Windsor chair, all legends.

-----------------

I just looked up Gustav Stickley. I wish to share the following remark of
his (from "The Craftsman") just in case you may find it an enjoyable frame
of perspective as I did.

"There are elements of intrinsic beauty in the simplification of a house
built on the log cabin idea. First, there is the bare beauty of the logs
themselves with their long lines and firm curves. Then there is the open
charm felt of the structural features which are not hidden under plaster and
ornament, but are clearly revealed, a charm felt in Japanese
architecture....The quiet rhythmic monotone of the wall of logs fills one
with the rustic peace of a secluded nook in the woods."


That's a nice quote, Bill. Uncle Gus was a wonderful furnituremaker,
especially while he had Harvey Ellis on his payroll. My favorite
piece was this bookcase: http://fwd4.me/9Kf Some day...

I always have fun reading issues of "The Craftsman", learning what
things meant the most to people from a century ago.


Now, get back to work! : )


Work, hell! I'm in decompression mode. My family (3 women of 3
generations) left this morning at 8am. A new record for this house
was made. An entire roll of TP disappeared in under 20 hours. It takes
me 6 to 8 weeks.

--
REMEMBER: The sooner you fall behind,
the more time you'll have to catch up!
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