Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Sorry., The right URL is

http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Rockwell-13-by-6-Planer/

The old URL is a redirector to this better one.

i

On 2009-10-09, Ignoramus19678 wrote:
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i

  #3   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 271
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 00:21:55 -0500, Igor wrote:

This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is that
the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer aside
when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got around to
replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on those
things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast belt
that drives planer knife).


Since you put it together, and apparently recently, it seems like
you should know better than anyone what you have to take apart
to change the table.

Do you have you a manual? There's a pdf copy at
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/pubdetail.aspx?id=2438
and although the scan is too light it is possible to make
out some of the details of the exploded-parts diagram.
Possibly printing the diagram would help with readability.

Re startup, you could take the blades out before first spinning it
up. (On the other hand, if the blades are sharp, tight, and are
all set at exactly the same height, you might want to just leave
them in place.) Anyway, before you run it with the blades installed,
verify that the bolts shown in fig. 28 of above pdf are properly
tight. Note, all the knives should have the same weight, all the
chocks, etc., since the rotor spins pretty fast (4500 rpm).

If the blades aren't sharp, you can buy a spare set at Amazon.com,
maybe $62 for Rockwell Delta, although the Freud C573 at $40 might
work ok - check the measurements. (The C573 would limit width of
cut to 12.5" instead of 13.125".) You might be able to find a local
resharpening operation with a lower cost than a new set of blades.

Re later operation, if the table rolls aren't in good shape, maybe
fasten a formica-surfaced table to the cast iron table. Also fasten
infeed and outfeed rollers to the table to support stock. Rollers
need to raise and lower with the table, of course.

--
jiw
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 879
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6


"Ignoramus19678" wrote in message
...
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i


First let me be the first to say YOU SUCK!

That said, you might want to check out rec.woodworking for planer specific
advice. One thing I can tell you is to check out some tool and die makers
in your area to sharpen your blades as a matched set. This will be a whole
lot cheaper then tossing them in favor of replacements and they will be dead
nuts on.

I think the procedure is to use an indicator to make sure the blades are set
properly, but I have never done it.

--

__
Roger Shoaf

Important factors in selecting a mate:
1] Depth of gene pool
2] Position on the food chain.





  #5   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 126
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Ignoramus19678 wrote:
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i



Turn it over by hand before starting to make sure the rotating parts
dont contact and fixed bits.

--
Kevin (Bluey)
"I'm not young enough to know everything."




  #6   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 648
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Roger Shoaf wrote:
"Ignoramus19678" wrote in
message ...
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single
phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase
motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i


First let me be the first to say YOU SUCK!

That said, you might want to check out rec.woodworking for planer
specific advice. One thing I can tell you is to check out some tool
and die makers in your area to sharpen your blades as a matched set.
This will be a whole lot cheaper then tossing them in favor of
replacements and they will be dead nuts on.

I think the procedure is to use an indicator to make sure the blades
are set properly, but I have never done it.

--

__
Roger Shoaf


Check the yeller pages for a saw sharpening service , they usually do (or
know somebody) planer blades too . There are devices that use magnets to
hold the blades in position as you tighten the clamp bolts , HF has one IIRC
.. Be careful when re-installing the blades , if they're not just right the
feed rollers can't properly pull the stock thru . Best way is to set the
guide before pulling the blades ...


--
Snag
"90 FLHTCU "Strider"
'39 WLDD "PopCycle"
BS 132/SENS/DOF


  #7   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 2009-10-09, James Waldby wrote:
Since you put it together, and apparently recently, it seems like
you should know better than anyone what you have to take apart
to change the table.


Other parts were disassembled, not the part holding the
table. Electrical etc

Do you have you a manual? There's a pdf copy at
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/pubdetail.aspx?id=2438
and although the scan is too light it is possible to make
out some of the details of the exploded-parts diagram.
Possibly printing the diagram would help with readability.


This is awesome. Good or bad, it is so much better to have a manual.
The manual also seems to be written by real people, not by Chinese,
and is a delight to read.

Re startup, you could take the blades out before first spinning it
up. (On the other hand, if the blades are sharp, tight, and are
all set at exactly the same height, you might want to just leave
them in place.) Anyway, before you run it with the blades installed,
verify that the bolts shown in fig. 28 of above pdf are properly
tight. Note, all the knives should have the same weight, all the
chocks, etc., since the rotor spins pretty fast (4500 rpm).


OK, will do

If the blades aren't sharp, you can buy a spare set at Amazon.com,
maybe $62 for Rockwell Delta, although the Freud C573 at $40 might
work ok - check the measurements. (The C573 would limit width of
cut to 12.5" instead of 13.125".) You might be able to find a local
resharpening operation with a lower cost than a new set of blades.


I did not even realize that blades were so inexpensive.

Re later operation, if the table rolls aren't in good shape, maybe
fasten a formica-surfaced table to the cast iron table. Also fasten
infeed and outfeed rollers to the table to support stock. Rollers
need to raise and lower with the table, of course.


Yes, I think that that is what they will do.

i
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 2009-10-09, Kevin(Bluey) wrote:
Ignoramus19678 wrote:
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).


Turn it over by hand before starting to make sure the rotating parts
dont contact and fixed bits.


Kevin, good point, I did that yesterday.

I want to clean the drive part, it is full of sawdust. Seems to make a
good application for compressed air.

i
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 896
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Ignoramus540 wrote:
On 2009-10-09, James Waldby wrote:
Since you put it together, and apparently recently, it seems like
you should know better than anyone what you have to take apart
to change the table.


Other parts were disassembled, not the part holding the
table. Electrical etc

Do you have you a manual? There's a pdf copy at
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/pubdetail.aspx?id=2438
and although the scan is too light it is possible to make
out some of the details of the exploded-parts diagram.
Possibly printing the diagram would help with readability.


This is awesome. Good or bad, it is so much better to have a manual.
The manual also seems to be written by real people, not by Chinese,
and is a delight to read.


That's a cool looking old beast. If it were me though, I wouldn't be
able to resist the temptation to do a complete disassembly, cleanup,
bead-blast, and repainting job. It looks kinda rough... but in a good
sorta way. :-)

--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
To reply, eat the taco.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqboyee/
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Ignoramus19678 wrote:
Sorry., The right URL is

http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Rockwell-13-by-6-Planer/

The old URL is a redirector to this better one.

i

On 2009-10-09, Ignoramus19678 wrote:
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

....

Ah....a Model 13. Got's one of them meself; they're nice small
beasties. As an aside, mine came from a group of 27(!) installed in a
NC furniture manufacturing facility. They had them set up in 9 rows of
three, each at a fixed thickness with each row taking outfeed of
previous and then on to thickness sander for final dimensioning.

Anyway, it's been a long time since had mine fully disassembled but
they're straightforward and, yes, you'll have to fully remove the
opposite side casting to replace the table---well, wait a minute--let me
think....No, I think you can--well, no, that was a bad thought, the
casting in the middle between the feed rollers is wider than the
clearance between the top I'm pretty sure now.

Anyway, they're not difficult to work on; the assembly is
straightforward and there aren't that many little parts in the main
body. Keep track of the shims/wave washers on the pressure and drive
rollers is about the most complicated it gets.

The key adjustment to make these puppies run well is adjusting the
height of the chipbreaker bar to be just above the knife cutting
circle--too low and material drags; too high and it may chatter and
snipe is bad.

The manual which I note somebody posted a link to from owwm has
instructions for making a guide block for setting the knives--that
method works but I've found a dial indicator w/ a straight adapter after
close really tunes it up.

Oh, and be sure to adjust the table to get it precisely parallel to the
cutterhead so your stock will come out same thickness across the width
w/o having to mount the knives cockeyed.

Good find...

--


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 2009-10-09, Steve Turner wrote:
This is awesome. Good or bad, it is so much better to have a manual.
The manual also seems to be written by real people, not by Chinese,
and is a delight to read.


That's a cool looking old beast. If it were me though, I wouldn't be
able to resist the temptation to do a complete disassembly, cleanup,
bead-blast, and repainting job. It looks kinda rough... but in a good
sorta way. :-)


It does not actually look rough, it is simply dirty.

i
  #12   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 127
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Oct 8, 10:21*pm, Ignoramus19678 ignoramus19...@NOSPAM.
19678.invalid wrote:
This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/

I would like some comments, specifically perhaps any planer-related
warnings and things to double check before first power up.

The reason why it was a pile of parts and not a working planer, is
that the cast iron table is cracked. However, the parts included a
replacement table, still in shipping plywood. They set this planer
aside when table broke, bought the replacement table, and never got
around to replacing it, so it sat like this for years.

So, my second question is, how hard is it to replace the table on
those things, does it require a deep disassembly or not.

I do believe that I reassembled it carefully and that all belts are
properly engaging (the slow feed, variable speed belt and the fast
belt that drives planer knife).

thanks

i


Maybe a good unit and maybe not. Cast iron tables do not break without
a good reason. If someone jammed the unit, the belts would slip. If
metal, like a nail was in the wood, it just wrecks the cutter blades.
The unit shows no sign of being dropped or tipped over. My brother's
planer really doesn't like knots in the wood, but they don't cause the
table to break.

Therefore, the only way I can imagine the table breaking is if one or
more of the cutting blades came out while the unit was operating and
the resulting hammering broke the table. If the blades are out,
examine the rotor and the blade slots carefully for damage. Also the
bearings of the rotor for damage. Are the blade adjusting screws still
there?

If possible, use a dial indicator to check the rotor for roundness. If
you can't get an indicator in there, use a machinist jack screw to
almost touch the rotor and a light behind it while you rotate the
rotor.

Paul.
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

KD7HB wrote:
....

Therefore, the only way I can imagine the table breaking is if one or
more of the cutting blades came out while the unit was operating and
the resulting hammering broke the table.


I have one of these and that scenario is impossible to break a
table--it'd make a helluva a racket but a tool steel knive 1/8" thick
will simply snap and the gibs are soft.

What, specifically, cause a break I don't know of course, but it's
possible there was a manufacturing defect that took a long time to show
up (these guys went out of production in the early 80s or so), but I'd
wager it was tipped sometime. They're big and heavy enough and a little
top-heavy and the tables project so it would land directly on one end or
the other and leave no other visible damage quite easily.

IMO it's almost certainly as good as new once he replaces the damaged table.


If the blades are out,
examine the rotor and the blade slots carefully for damage. Also the
bearings of the rotor for damage. Are the blade adjusting screws still
there?

If possible, use a dial indicator to check the rotor for roundness. If
you can't get an indicator in there, use a machinist jack screw to
almost touch the rotor and a light behind it while you rotate the
rotor.


The cutterhead assembly is simply finished as it comes off the lathe;
it's not polished or terribly true; they were balanced at the factory by
strategically removing a little material w/ a drill.

If it had any sort of major accident like you're postulating, it'll be
obvious from a very casual look; won't need any fancy measurements.

As for the ruggedness w/ wood, these are a small but industrial-strength
machine; they don't have any problem w/ up to 6" hardwoods. They're a
whole different class of machine than the current popular
portables--just the infeed table alone probably weighs more than an
entire portable.

--
  #14   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 2009-10-09, dpb wrote:
KD7HB wrote:
...

Therefore, the only way I can imagine the table breaking is if one or
more of the cutting blades came out while the unit was operating and
the resulting hammering broke the table.


I have one of these and that scenario is impossible to break a
table--it'd make a helluva a racket but a tool steel knive 1/8" thick
will simply snap and the gibs are soft.


Guys, I want to say right away that a crack in the table looks NOTHING
like a typical usual crack. I will try to take better picture today (I
finished putting it together, outdoors, past midnight). Any guessing
would likely be off base, without seeing the particular defect.

Once I clarify my own understanding of what broke, and take pictures,
we could make better guesses.

i

What, specifically, cause a break I don't know of course, but it's
possible there was a manufacturing defect that took a long time to show
up (these guys went out of production in the early 80s or so), but I'd
wager it was tipped sometime. They're big and heavy enough and a little
top-heavy and the tables project so it would land directly on one end or
the other and leave no other visible damage quite easily.

IMO it's almost certainly as good as new once he replaces the damaged table.


If the blades are out,
examine the rotor and the blade slots carefully for damage. Also the
bearings of the rotor for damage. Are the blade adjusting screws still
there?

If possible, use a dial indicator to check the rotor for roundness. If
you can't get an indicator in there, use a machinist jack screw to
almost touch the rotor and a light behind it while you rotate the
rotor.


The cutterhead assembly is simply finished as it comes off the lathe;
it's not polished or terribly true; they were balanced at the factory by
strategically removing a little material w/ a drill.

If it had any sort of major accident like you're postulating, it'll be
obvious from a very casual look; won't need any fancy measurements.

As for the ruggedness w/ wood, these are a small but industrial-strength
machine; they don't have any problem w/ up to 6" hardwoods. They're a
whole different class of machine than the current popular
portables--just the infeed table alone probably weighs more than an
entire portable.

--

  #15   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
dpb dpb is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,595
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Ignoramus540 wrote:
....

Guys, I want to say right away that a crack in the table looks NOTHING
like a typical usual crack. I will try to take better picture today (I
finished putting it together, outdoors, past midnight). Any guessing
would likely be off base, without seeing the particular defect.

Once I clarify my own understanding of what broke, and take pictures,
we could make better guesses.

....
I had presumed from your initial post one of the tables was broken
significantly....I really wasn't intending to try to guess what had
happened other than to put the kibosh on the other poster's idea that a
knife could somehow do such a thing to a chunk of cast iron the mass of
this puppy...

Which piece does have the crack, the rear/front or middle section of the
table?

While I'm writing, my earlier posting was partially in error; I wasn't
thinking of how there are the three separate pieces. I haven't done
much woodworking to use it for a while but I do need to get back so I'll
go take a look at the guy sometime over the next couple of days and
refresh my memory on the assembly/disassembly and order thereof. If
knew which piece in particular you're after replacing, that'd help...

OBTW, if it's been sitting for quite a long time, double check the gear
case for oil level before running it any length of time--it's a chain
drive in there so it won't hurt it for a short period test run but do
want to make sure it's got lube before actual use "in anger"...

--


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 852
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 00:21:55 -0500, Ignoramus19678
wrote:

This is a Rockwell 13x6 planer. The motor is 3 HP Baldor single phase.

When I bought it for $20, it was in parts. When I agreed to buy it, I
did not even realize that it was a planer. At first, I thought I was
buying a pile of worthless metal parts plus a 3 HP single phase motor.

http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/mis...3-by-6-Planer/


You confused me there. Until I was the pictures, I assumed that you were
talking about a 13 foot by 6 foot metal planer, not a 13inch by 6 inch wood
thicknesser...



Mark Rand
RTFM
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

In article ,
Ignoramus540 wrote:

On 2009-10-09, James Waldby wrote:
Since you put it together, and apparently recently, it seems like
you should know better than anyone what you have to take apart
to change the table.


Other parts were disassembled, not the part holding the
table. Electrical etc

Do you have you a manual? There's a pdf copy at
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/pubdetail.aspx?id=2438
and although the scan is too light it is possible to make
out some of the details of the exploded-parts diagram.
Possibly printing the diagram would help with readability.


This is awesome. Good or bad, it is so much better to have a manual.
The manual also seems to be written by real people, not by Chinese,
and is a delight to read.

Re startup, you could take the blades out before first spinning it
up. (On the other hand, if the blades are sharp, tight, and are
all set at exactly the same height, you might want to just leave
them in place.) Anyway, before you run it with the blades installed,
verify that the bolts shown in fig. 28 of above pdf are properly
tight. Note, all the knives should have the same weight, all the
chocks, etc., since the rotor spins pretty fast (4500 rpm).


OK, will do

If the blades aren't sharp, you can buy a spare set at Amazon.com,
maybe $62 for Rockwell Delta, although the Freud C573 at $40 might
work ok - check the measurements. (The C573 would limit width of
cut to 12.5" instead of 13.125".) You might be able to find a local
resharpening operation with a lower cost than a new set of blades.


I did not even realize that blades were so inexpensive.


Check woodworking fora to see what blade makes are best.

But run without blades, bladeholders, and screws the first time, powered
by a variac if possible, just to be sure that there isn't a hidden
issue. (Don't run under load from a variac, as induction motors will
overheat if loaded while being fed too little voltage.)

As for the broken table, if the machine doesn't have visible signs of a
severe misadventure, the machine or table may have been dropped. The
marks made by a sufficient misadventure won't be subtle.

Joe Gwinn
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast of a planet?

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...x6-474286-.htm

  #19   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,155
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 3/30/2021 10:45 AM, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast of a
planet?



The planet is doing well.
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,377
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet writes:
On 3/30/2021 10:45 AM, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast of a
planet?



The planet is doing well.


That's arguable. Overpopulated, polluted, droughts, flooding, et alia.


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,845
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Tuesday, March 30, 2021 at 11:45:06 AM UTC-4, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast of a planet?


Unfortunately, the planet collided with its sun and wiped out all life in that
part of the universe. It's going to be a long road back. So sad.
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,155
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On 3/30/2021 12:49 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet writes:
On 3/30/2021 10:45 AM, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast of a
planet?



The planet is doing well.


That's arguable. Overpopulated, polluted, droughts, flooding, et alia.


But that has always been life on earth..
  #24   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking,rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

Planer, not planet! Darn auto correct and no proof reading 🤪

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...x6-474286-.htm

  #27   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,845
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Friday, April 2, 2021 at 7:08:49 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 02 Apr 2021 21:54:46 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:
wrote in
:

On Tue, 30 Mar 2021 17:49:19 GMT, (Scott Lurndal)
wrote:

Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet writes:
On 3/30/2021 10:45 AM, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast
of a planet?



The planet is doing well.

That's arguable. Overpopulated, polluted, droughts, flooding, et
alia.

If you're not happy with the ride, you can get off at any time.


Well, I guess that's true. It's never been easier to find photos of
scantily and totally unclad ladies and gentlemen... Whatever your tastes..

Took me a second.


No wonder shes disappointed.
  #28   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,833
Default Rockwell planer, any comments on this beast 13x6

On Sat, 3 Apr 2021 14:00:01 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Friday, April 2, 2021 at 7:08:49 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Fri, 02 Apr 2021 21:54:46 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:
wrote in
:

On Tue, 30 Mar 2021 17:49:19 GMT, (Scott Lurndal)
wrote:

Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet writes:
On 3/30/2021 10:45 AM, avTronic wrote:
Hi. Its now 11 years later. What ever happened with your beast
of a planet?



The planet is doing well.

That's arguable. Overpopulated, polluted, droughts, flooding, et
alia.

If you're not happy with the ride, you can get off at any time.


Well, I guess that's true. It's never been easier to find photos of
scantily and totally unclad ladies and gentlemen... Whatever your tastes.

Took me a second.


No wonder shes disappointed.


That isn't what they mean by "living fast and loose"?

Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there any value in an old 3 HP Rockwell planer? Ignoramus14280 Woodworking 5 October 6th 09 01:13 PM
Any DW 734 Planer comments? Andy H Woodworking 7 December 7th 07 11:59 PM
Comments wanted on Jet JPM-13CS Planer/Molder Bruce Barnett Woodworking 11 November 15th 06 08:13 PM
Older Rockwell Planer The Davenport's Woodworking 5 March 11th 06 09:34 PM
Woodmaster planer user comments Sheldon Dingwall Woodworking 2 February 3rd 04 02:37 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"