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Old October 26th 15, 05:54 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On Monday, October 26, 2015 at 11:49:14 AM UTC-5, wrote:

"gun wash" for about $8 in a five gallon container.


Should read "$8 a gallon in a five gallon container, or $40 a container".

Robert

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Old October 26th 15, 07:57 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 10/26/2015 11:36 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:
Leon wrote:

.

Robert you might entertain checking with an "automotive" paint
supplier. I know that they typically sell 55 gal drums to body shops
and they do have different grades. We used to buy 55 gal drums of
thinner to clean the guns. We bought the better stuff for mixing to
the paint. Anyway they might be a bit less expensive since they deal
in higher volumes.


I agree that this would likely be cheaper, but it's a lot more expensive
than what you recall Leon. My price on gun wash has more than doubled over
the past 5 years or so. Still cheaper than buying it by the gallon, but a
lot more expensive than what is was only a short time ago.

Just comparing apples to oranges Mike. No doubt everything is more
expensive these days but a higher volume dealer is probably going to
have the better pricing.
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Old March 11th 16, 09:23 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On Friday, February 13, 2009 at 10:00:36 AM UTC-8, bw wrote:
Purchased last fall, opened yesterday. Stirred as usual, looked ok.
Applied with foam brush on test piece of medium pored teak-like wood.
Set aside at room temperature and it immediately starts to look like I
coated the wood in white soap.
What the hey. After a couple hours no change. Almost looks like I painted
the wood with white lead.

I've used this produce before without problems, but it "might" be some kind
of reaction with the wood.
The wood was purchased at a farm sale in a batch of other hard woods that
could have been over 30 years old. Some mahogany and what I thought was teak
but I can't imagine what the heck happened.

Maybe return the can to the store and try another batch.

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Old March 11th 16, 02:29 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

wrote:
On Friday, February 13, 2009 at 10:00:36 AM UTC-8, bw wrote:
Purchased last fall, opened yesterday. Stirred as usual, looked ok.
Applied with foam brush on test piece of medium pored teak-like wood.
Set aside at room temperature and it immediately starts to look like I
coated the wood in white soap.
What the hey. After a couple hours no change. Almost looks like I painted
the wood with white lead.

I've used this produce before without problems, but it "might" be some kind
of reaction with the wood.
The wood was purchased at a farm sale in a batch of other hard woods that
could have been over 30 years old. Some mahogany and what I thought was teak
but I can't imagine what the heck happened.

Maybe return the can to the store and try another batch.




Sounds like moisture contamination.
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Old March 11th 16, 03:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On Fri, 11 Mar 2016 07:29:39 -0600, Leon wrote:

wrote:
On Friday, February 13, 2009 at 10:00:36 AM UTC-8, bw wrote:
Purchased last fall, opened yesterday. Stirred as usual, looked ok.
Applied with foam brush on test piece of medium pored teak-like wood.
Set aside at room temperature and it immediately starts to look like I
coated the wood in white soap.
What the hey. After a couple hours no change. Almost looks like I painted
the wood with white lead.

I've used this produce before without problems, but it "might" be some kind
of reaction with the wood.
The wood was purchased at a farm sale in a batch of other hard woods that
could have been over 30 years old. Some mahogany and what I thought was teak
but I can't imagine what the heck happened.

Maybe return the can to the store and try another batch.




Sounds like moisture contamination.


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)


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Old March 11th 16, 04:07 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 3/11/2016 9:36 AM, Gordon Shumway wrote:



Sounds like moisture contamination.


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)


Unless it was stored in a very damp environment. Or the humidity was
extremely high.

I'd put a little of the poly on another piece of wood to see what
happens as the first step.
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Old March 11th 16, 04:12 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 3/11/2016 8:36 AM, Gordon Shumway wrote:
On Fri, 11 Mar 2016 07:29:39 -0600, Leon wrote:

wrote:
On Friday, February 13, 2009 at 10:00:36 AM UTC-8, bw wrote:
Purchased last fall, opened yesterday. Stirred as usual, looked ok.
Applied with foam brush on test piece of medium pored teak-like wood.
Set aside at room temperature and it immediately starts to look like I
coated the wood in white soap.
What the hey. After a couple hours no change. Almost looks like I painted
the wood with white lead.

I've used this produce before without problems, but it "might" be some kind
of reaction with the wood.
The wood was purchased at a farm sale in a batch of other hard woods that
could have been over 30 years old. Some mahogany and what I thought was teak
but I can't imagine what the heck happened.

Maybe return the can to the store and try another batch.



Sounds like moisture contamination.


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)

Yes it has been drying for years but if it was rained on it is no longer
dry.
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Old March 11th 16, 07:45 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

Gordon Shumway wrote:


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)


I agree that this does not sound like a moisture issue to me. I have
had various woods react to finishes which was caused by the internal
oils of the wood reacting with the finish. I've seen many different
types of reaction, so that would probably be my first guess with no
other information.

I would do a couple of things - I would try the finish on a completely
different piece of wood - a different type of wood. What is the result
of that test?

I would try to find out exactly what your piece of wood really is. Teak
is a wood that is often mis-identified. Monkeypod is often called Teak
for example, and it's not.

I'd try applying a sealing coat of shellac to a scrap of the wood and
then apply your finish. Any difference? If so, I'd go back to the
notion that it may be internal oils. Very well dried woods can and will
still weep oils out when a finish is applied. Shellac is a very good
universal sealing to deal with this.

Get back with your results...

--
-Mike-

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Old March 11th 16, 08:06 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On Friday, March 11, 2016 at 1:45:27 PM UTC-5, Mike Marlow wrote:
Gordon Shumway wrote:


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)


I agree that this does not sound like a moisture issue to me. I have
had various woods react to finishes which was caused by the internal
oils of the wood reacting with the finish. I've seen many different
types of reaction, so that would probably be my first guess with no
other information.

I would do a couple of things - I would try the finish on a completely
different piece of wood - a different type of wood. What is the result
of that test?

I would try to find out exactly what your piece of wood really is. Teak
is a wood that is often mis-identified. Monkeypod is often called Teak
for example, and it's not.

I'd try applying a sealing coat of shellac to a scrap of the wood and
then apply your finish. Any difference? If so, I'd go back to the
notion that it may be internal oils. Very well dried woods can and will
still weep oils out when a finish is applied. Shellac is a very good
universal sealing to deal with this.

Get back with your results...

--
-Mike-


Mike,

I think you missed the joke.

This thread was originally started in 2009, thus the wood should have
dried out by now. ;-)

(Google Groups seems to have a habit of having threads that are extremely
old suddenly pop up again. I see in it a.h.r quite often. I think it might
have something to do with web forums that are "mirroring" usenet. Someone
on a forum finds an old thread via a search, they respond and suddenly
the thread becomes active again. Since GG and the forums are "putting and
taking" from usenet, the threads show up everywhere. In GG it's evident
that it's an old thread because the date is prominently displayed. I can't
speak to newsreader apps or web based forms. Maybe it's not that easy to
see that it is a really old (and probably dead) thread.)
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Old March 11th 16, 09:57 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 3/11/2016 2:06 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Friday, March 11, 2016 at 1:45:27 PM UTC-5, Mike Marlow wrote:
Gordon Shumway wrote:


It's definitely not moisture in the wood. The wood has had at least since 2009 to dry out. ;-)


I agree that this does not sound like a moisture issue to me. I have
had various woods react to finishes which was caused by the internal
oils of the wood reacting with the finish. I've seen many different
types of reaction, so that would probably be my first guess with no
other information.

I would do a couple of things - I would try the finish on a completely
different piece of wood - a different type of wood. What is the result
of that test?

I would try to find out exactly what your piece of wood really is. Teak
is a wood that is often mis-identified. Monkeypod is often called Teak
for example, and it's not.

I'd try applying a sealing coat of shellac to a scrap of the wood and
then apply your finish. Any difference? If so, I'd go back to the
notion that it may be internal oils. Very well dried woods can and will
still weep oils out when a finish is applied. Shellac is a very good
universal sealing to deal with this.

Get back with your results...

--
-Mike-


Mike,

I think you missed the joke.

This thread was originally started in 2009, thus the wood should have
dried out by now. ;-)


I guess it wasn't fast drying poly.

Yeah, I missed it too.



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