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Old September 20th 08, 11:41 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 lengthwise

I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. My
Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to move the
lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the side that
has the splitter. My son likes to do it on the Table Saw right along
the fence. To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?
Please don't laugh about this dumb question, but I don't like to argue
or tell my son what to do, and I'm too old to remember which way to do
it....Thank you in advance........PM

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Old September 20th 08, 11:59 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4length wise

pete wrote:
I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. My
Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to move the
lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the side that
has the splitter. My son likes to do it on the Table Saw right along
the fence. To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?


I like the fact that most of the blade on a table saw is below the table.
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Old September 21st 08, 12:10 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4length wise

pete wrote:
I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. My
Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to move the
lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the side that
has the splitter. My son likes to do it on the Table Saw right along
the fence. ...


I use the radial myself because it's in a long table (12-ft) so have
good support.

Either works, but need a good outfeed table or other support on the
tablesaw.

Use whichever has the proper support or make it for whichever you're
most comfortable with.

--
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Old September 21st 08, 12:40 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 length wise

On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:

I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. ...
To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?
...


dpb gave you the right answer. Do it whichever way gives the workpiece
the most stability and support.

I prefer using a table saw with an adequate outfeed table, but that's
just what I'm used to. A lot of folks cringe at the thought of ripping
with a RA, but a RA with a table that stabilizes the work is much
better than trying to use a TS without an outfeed table of with roller
stand supports that, IME, are far too prone to tipping or applying
side loads to the work (if the rollers are the least bit canted to one
side or the other).

Tom Veatch
Wichita, KS
USA
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Old September 21st 08, 12:49 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 length wise

I have both a radial arm saw and a table saw. Ripping a 2x4 lengthwise is a
natural job for a tablesaw. However, whichever saw you do use, keep in mind
that the 2x4 may be wet inside and may not be exactly straight which could
cause problems when cutting. If it is wet inside it will want to either
spread or contract together causing the wood to bind on the side of the
blade. Also wet wood can be a problem with a "good" blade that has too many
teeth. When I have to cut such wood I use an old, but still sharp, carbide
blade with a wide kerf, which has only 8 teeth on a 10 inch blade. The blade
doesn't bind much and the wide spaced teeth clear out the wet sticky sawdust
instead of heating up.



"Tom Veatch" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:

I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. ...
To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?
...


dpb gave you the right answer. Do it whichever way gives the workpiece
the most stability and support.

I prefer using a table saw with an adequate outfeed table, but that's
just what I'm used to. A lot of folks cringe at the thought of ripping
with a RA, but a RA with a table that stabilizes the work is much
better than trying to use a TS without an outfeed table of with roller
stand supports that, IME, are far too prone to tipping or applying
side loads to the work (if the rollers are the least bit canted to one
side or the other).

Tom Veatch
Wichita, KS
USA




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Old September 21st 08, 01:21 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4length wise

On Sep 20, 4:49*pm, "EXT" wrote:
I have both a radial arm saw and a table saw. Ripping a 2x4 lengthwise is a
natural job for a tablesaw. However, whichever saw you do use, keep in mind
that the 2x4 may be wet inside and may not be exactly straight which could
cause problems when cutting. If it is wet inside it will want to either
spread or contract together causing the wood to bind on the side of the
blade. Also wet wood can be a problem with a "good" blade that has too many
teeth. When I have to cut such wood I use an old, but still sharp, carbide
blade with a wide kerf, which has only 8 teeth on a 10 inch blade. The blade
doesn't bind much and the wide spaced teeth clear out the wet sticky sawdust
instead of heating up.

"Tom Veatch" wrote in message

...



On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:


I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. ...
To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?
...


dpb gave you the right answer. Do it whichever way gives the workpiece
the most stability and support.


I prefer using a table saw with an adequate outfeed table, but that's
just what I'm used to. A lot of folks cringe at the thought of ripping
with a RA, but a RA with a table that stabilizes the work is much
better than trying to use a TS without an outfeed table of with roller
stand supports that, IME, are far too prone to tipping or applying
side loads to the work (if the rollers are the least bit canted to one
side or the other).


Tom Veatch
Wichita, KS
USA- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I love all the answers, and at least I know that he could use the TS
as well as the RAS. and yes we have super support, because I believe
in the support issue very strongly. Maybe more answers will come, but
I'm sure there is probably no person that would only use one saw over
the other. The answers so far just make too much sense.....Thanks
again you nice folks here for helping me with some good answers.....I
almost forgot Tom mentioned using a sharp but otherwise older sawblade
with only 8 or 10 teeth. It really made a lot of sense to me, but I'm
again shocked for never considering that angle. I always use the
sawblade with the highest amount of teeth. I thought this would always
makes sense. Tom's remark however makes sense now, and I will never
forget it, well I hope not.....what a great discussion, I'm really
glad I wrote....Pete
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Old September 21st 08, 03:26 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4length wise

pete wrote:
....
with only 8 or 10 teeth. It really made a lot of sense to me, but I'm
again shocked for never considering that angle. I always use the
sawblade with the highest amount of teeth. I thought this would always
makes sense. Tom's remark however makes sense now, and I will never
forget it, well I hope not.....what a great discussion, I'm really
glad I wrote....Pete


It's not the number so much as the type. For ripping you really want a
rip tooth, not a cross or combination.

Framing material is so soft it really doesn't matter a whole lot other
than there is some advantage in coarser w/ wet material but a very fine
tooth crosscut would definitely be a poor choice.

--
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Old September 21st 08, 04:14 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 length wise

On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:

My Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to
move the lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the side
that has the splitter.


Well, I guess I'm not familiar with exactly what a "compound Rockwell
saw" but if it's truly a radial arm saw, and thus very similar in
design and use to my Craftsman radial arm saw, then you absolutely do
not want to push the 2x4 from the side that has the splitter. In fact,
I don't even see how you could do it the way you describe. The blade
has to make a kerf for the splitter to go in.

When ripping with a radial arm saw (not automatically a dangerous act,
contrary to internet lore), the wood is fed toward the teeth which are
spinning toward the wood--exactly like with a table saw. The splitter
is the last thing encountered by the wood in the whole operation.

I'm surprised no one caught this, or I have it wrong.



--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
http://www.normstools.com

Proud participant of rec.woodworking since February, 1997

email addy de-spam-ified due to 1,000 spams per month.
If you can't figure out how to use it, I probably wouldn't
care to correspond with you anyway.
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Old September 21st 08, 05:15 AM posted to rec.woodworking
CC CC is offline
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 length wise


"LRod" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:

My Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to
move the lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the
side
that has the splitter.


Well, I guess I'm not familiar with exactly what a "compound
Rockwell
saw" but if it's truly a radial arm saw, and thus very similar in
design and use to my Craftsman radial arm saw, then you absolutely
do
not want to push the 2x4 from the side that has the splitter. In
fact,
I don't even see how you could do it the way you describe. The blade
has to make a kerf for the splitter to go in.

When ripping with a radial arm saw (not automatically a dangerous
act,
contrary to internet lore), the wood is fed toward the teeth which
are
spinning toward the wood--exactly like with a table saw. The
splitter
is the last thing encountered by the wood in the whole operation.

I'm surprised no one caught this, or I have it wrong.



--
LRod


Sounds like he is talking about setting the saw head up for either a
in rip or out rip
It can be turned either way, I'd guess he set it so it was turned so
the splitter and blade was
to the outside of the cut (toward the operator looking at the motor,)
versus toward the fence
side
CC.

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Old September 21st 08, 12:52 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Should I use my Radial Arm saw or my Table Saw to cut a 2 x4 length wise

On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 15:41:14 -0700 (PDT), pete
wrote:

I have 2 nice saws and have to cut a 2x4 in half length wise. My son
approached the Table Saw, and I suggested the Radial Arm saw. My
Radial Arm saw is a compound Rockwell saw, that allows me to move the
lower arm into a position so I can push the 2 x 4 from the side that
has the splitter. My son likes to do it on the Table Saw right along
the fence. To be honest, could I get a feeling what you guys do?
Please don't laugh about this dumb question, but I don't like to argue
or tell my son what to do, and I'm too old to remember which way to do
it....Thank you in advance........PM


I don't have a radial arm saw, but a table saw is the better choice
for ripping. Probably safer too.


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