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Old October 29th 07, 11:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

Just finishing my workshop and am doing my finish work. On 220
electrical outlets I notice there are a couple of different styles.
What is the difference. There is on that is similar to a 110 sytle but
with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. there is also one they call
a NEMA 6(?)? All three blades are in a cricular pattern. My new
jointer recommends the NEMA but would like to know what the difference
is and why one is better than the other.

Thanks,

Jim

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Old October 30th 07, 12:14 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 16:40:41 -0700, Jim Brown
wrote:

Just finishing my workshop and am doing my finish work. On 220
electrical outlets I notice there are a couple of different styles.
What is the difference. There is on that is similar to a 110 sytle but
with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. there is also one they call
a NEMA 6(?)? All three blades are in a cricular pattern. My new
jointer recommends the NEMA but would like to know what the difference
is and why one is better than the other.

Thanks,

Jim


Not so much that one is "better" than the other, but that the
differently configured receptacles are rated for different maximum
current. BTW, they are all "NEMA" configurations. NEMA 5-XX are 120v
plug/receptacle configurations and NEMA 6-XX are for 240v circuits.

Here is a link to a chart of the NEMA configurations for the straight
blade (non-locking) configurations:

http://www.westernextralite.com/resources.asp?key=69

and for the circular blade (locking) configurations:

http://www.westernextralite.com/resources.asp?key=70




Tom Veatch
Wichita, KS
USA
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Old October 30th 07, 05:12 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 19:14:58 -0500, Tom Veatch wrote:

On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 16:40:41 -0700, Jim Brown
wrote:

Just finishing my workshop and am doing my finish work. On 220
electrical outlets I notice there are a couple of different styles.
What is the difference. There is on that is similar to a 110 sytle but
with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. there is also one they call
a NEMA 6(?)? All three blades are in a cricular pattern. My new
jointer recommends the NEMA but would like to know what the difference
is and why one is better than the other.

Thanks,

Jim


Not so much that one is "better" than the other, but that the
differently configured receptacles are rated for different maximum
current. BTW, they are all "NEMA" configurations. NEMA 5-XX are 120v
plug/receptacle configurations and NEMA 6-XX are for 240v circuits.


"Rated" may be an unfortunate choice of words (especially when using
"for maximum current"). "Keyed" is more accurate. For example, (and I
can't speak to the locking series) the 6-15 and 6-20 are keyed
differently, and the 6-15 is for 15 A and the 6-20 is for 20 A.
However, an exception exists in the NEC which permits that in 15 and
20 A circuits (on both 120V and 240V supplies), either receptacle may
be used on a 20A line. You can't, however, use a -20 on a 15 A line.

So, clearly, the 15 A receptacle is "rated" (in tems of its ability to
carry the current) for 20 A, it's just "keyed" for 15 A plugs (a 20 A
plug won't fit into it). However a 20 A receptacle will accept both a
15 A and a 20 A plug.

All of the foregoing is thrown out the window if the only receptacle
on the circuit is a simplex receptacle--then the receptacle must match
the current capacity dictated by the wire/breaker.


--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net

Proud participant of rec.woodworking since February, 1997

email addy de-spam-ified due to 1,000 spams per month.
If you can't figure out how to use it, I probably wouldn't
care to correspond with you anyway.
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Old October 30th 07, 02:24 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?


"Jim Brown" wrote in message
...
Just finishing my workshop and am doing my finish work. On 220
electrical outlets I notice there are a couple of different styles.
What is the difference. There is on that is similar to a 110 sytle but
with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. there is also one they call
a NEMA 6(?)? All three blades are in a cricular pattern. My new
jointer recommends the NEMA but would like to know what the difference
is and why one is better than the other.

Thanks,

Jim


I believe the different plug styles are for different amounts of current.
You should choose the appropriate one for the current of your 220 line.

Mike


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Old October 30th 07, 03:10 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 05:12:53 +0000, LRod
wrote:

"Rated" may be an unfortunate choice of words (especially when using
"for maximum current"). "Keyed" is more accurate.
...
All of the foregoing is thrown out the window if the only receptacle
on the circuit is a simplex receptacle--then the receptacle must match
the current capacity dictated by the wire/breaker.


Well, since - if there's only one receptacle on the circuit - the
"keying" of the device must match the current capacity (IOW, maximum
amperage) of the circuit, I'd tend to call that the "rated" capacity
of the receptacle.

But, have it your way, it's not worth arguing over..

Tom Veatch
Wichita, KS
USA


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Old October 30th 07, 04:45 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 05:12:53 +0000, LRod wrote:


Not so much that one is "better" than the other, but that the
differently configured receptacles are rated for different maximum
current. BTW, they are all "NEMA" configurations. NEMA 5-XX are 120v
plug/receptacle configurations and NEMA 6-XX are for 240v circuits.


"Rated" may be an unfortunate choice of words (especially when using
"for maximum current"). "Keyed" is more accurate. For example, (and I
can't speak to the locking series) the 6-15 and 6-20 are keyed
differently, and the 6-15 is for 15 A and the 6-20 is for 20 A.
However, an exception exists in the NEC which permits that in 15 and
20 A circuits (on both 120V and 240V supplies), either receptacle may
be used on a 20A line. You can't, however, use a -20 on a 15 A line.

So, clearly, the 15 A receptacle is "rated" (in tems of its ability to
carry the current) for 20 A, it's just "keyed" for 15 A plugs (a 20 A
plug won't fit into it). However a 20 A receptacle will accept both a
15 A and a 20 A plug.

All of the foregoing is thrown out the window if the only receptacle
on the circuit is a simplex receptacle--then the receptacle must match
the current capacity dictated by the wire/breaker.


Wow.. I would have loved the chance to pick your brain a few months ago... great
info!

Mexican builders don't have a lot of RV experience, so when I specified a "50
amp hookup" they put in some weird kind of plug that a friend said might be from
a dryer or something...
Oh.. before we found out that it wasn't an RV outlet, we went to the States and
bought a "dog bone" to plug into it to convert it to a 30 amp plug for our
trailer..
We didn't realize we had a problem until the dog bone wouldn't plug into the
outlet..
Last month we took a trip to Yuma and took along the dog bone.. went top an RV
place and paid almost $50 for the outlet that fits the plug on the dog bone..
Lots more expensive and time consuming than asking a knowledgeable person a few
questions...


mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
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Old October 30th 07, 06:33 PM posted to rec.woodworking
Jon Jon is offline
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Default 220 electrical outlets?

The NEMA ones are great! We have put them in place of the old ones we had
as the round ones are twist lock, no worry about someone accidently pulling
out the plug. Besides all my outlets are in the ceiling and not on the
floor or walls. See here for explanation:

http://www.nooutage.com/nema_configu...Configurations

Jon


"Jim Brown" wrote in message
...
Just finishing my workshop and am doing my finish work. On 220
electrical outlets I notice there are a couple of different styles.
What is the difference. There is on that is similar to a 110 sytle but
with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. there is also one they call
a NEMA 6(?)? All three blades are in a cricular pattern. My new
jointer recommends the NEMA but would like to know what the difference
is and why one is better than the other.

Thanks,

Jim



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Old October 31st 07, 02:16 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Shop Heating

I am getting to the point of deciding what type of heat to install in a new
workshop. The shop is 30'x54' with 10' walls and will be insulated to R-20
in the walls and R-38 in the ceiling. I have natural gas available and am
trying to decide between using one or two of the ventless "blue flame" gas
units or a single ceiling mounted vented gas furnace. The ventless units
would be less expensive and have a few other advantages, but I have heard
that because they do not vent combustion air outside of the building they
can lead to potential moisture problems. Is this an issues to be concerned
about? The shop will be used for woodworking and fossil/mineral preparation
so a moisture problem would not be good.

Thanks for any recommendations or advice any one has.


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Old October 31st 07, 04:00 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Shop Heating

"dbomke" wrote in message
m...
I am getting to the point of deciding what type of heat to install in a new
workshop. The shop is 30'x54' with 10' walls and will be insulated to R-20
in the walls and R-38 in the ceiling. I have natural gas available and am
trying to decide between using one or two of the ventless "blue flame" gas
units or a single ceiling mounted vented gas furnace. The ventless units
would be less expensive and have a few other advantages, but I have heard
that because they do not vent combustion air outside of the building they
can lead to potential moisture problems. Is this an issues to be concerned
about? The shop will be used for woodworking and fossil/mineral
preparation so a moisture problem would not be good.

Thanks for any recommendations or advice any one has.



Simply put, YOU DO NOT WANT VENT LESS!!
Dumping the exhaust into the building is definitely a problem, with both
possible oxygen depletion and moisture. In my area you can not even install
vent less heaters, they are against building code. Many of them recommend
leaving a door or window slightly open when using them.
Buy a 50,000~60,000 BTU Reznor UDAP, or a Modine Hot Dawg. And be done with
it!
Now someone will come along and contradict every thing I just wrote!
Good luck!
Greg


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Old October 31st 07, 05:17 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Shop Heating

"dbomke" wrote in message
m...
I am getting to the point of deciding what type of heat to install in a new
workshop. The shop is 30'x54' with 10' walls and will be insulated to R-20
in the walls and R-38 in the ceiling. I have natural gas available and am
trying to decide between using one or two of the ventless "blue flame" gas
units or a single ceiling mounted vented gas furnace. The ventless units
would be less expensive and have a few other advantages, but I have heard
that because they do not vent combustion air outside of the building they
can lead to potential moisture problems. Is this an issues to be concerned
about? The shop will be used for woodworking and fossil/mineral
preparation so a moisture problem would not be good.

Thanks for any recommendations or advice any one has.


IMO, do not get a ventless heater. My parents have one in their basement,
and I personally don't like the way it smells.

todd




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