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Old March 18th 07, 05:15 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?

Maybe a guillotine
with a 50 pound blade and a hundred foot drop.


That would be awesome. Though it would probably shatter my post not
cut it.

Ok, don't want to knock anyone for any more suggestions, but I think
I got enough to try we can let the thread die now

  #42   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 05:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
CW CW is offline
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Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?


"J. Clarke" wrote in message
...
CW wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...
On Mar 16, 1:02 pm, wrote:
Ok, I've tried cutting the end with a sawzall, the ends come out
uneven. I tried with a circular, I can't ever seem to get the cuts
to line up when I flip the wood to do the other side. And the miter
saw I have just isn't big enough.

I've resorted to having Home Depot cut them there, but they don't do
precision cuts, and sometimes they are too busy and I don't want to
wait.

Add in the fact that sooner or later I'm going to have rough sawn
4x4 that I will have to cut myself regardless.

Besides buying a really big miter/radial arm saw, any suggestions?

Handsaw, chainsaw, or a Prazi-beam cutter attachment for a
circular saw. Or you can use the method one of my neighbors
uses--find a neighbor to do it for you.

If you chose a handsaw try to find an antique Disston crosscut
saw with maybe 8 points and sharpen it yourself. Joint it first
and set it after if it needs it, often they do not. Most off-the
shelf
handsaws are not really sharp, set too coarse, and with teeth
that are two fine. A 4 point ripsaw will crosscut quickly too,
but leave a rougher kerf.

You could also design and build a 16" radial arm saw. Maybe a
guillotine with a 50 pound blade and a hundred foot drop. How about a
large lathe, steady rest and a part off tool? There is all kinds of
ways to overcomplicate this if you think about it long enough.


Using a sharp handsaw isn't "overcomplicating"--it used to be that
sharpening one's saw was just part of daily life--my father sharpened
his saws regularly and he wasn't even a carpenter by trade, he was a
sailor. The trouble is that modern Western-pattern saws are either very
expensive or not very good and finding an old Disston in decent shape
may be difficult. A 40 buck ryoba with a throw-away blade works
remarkably well and is readily accessible.

Odd, J Clark actually catching the point. Got to say though, I have a modern
Stanley handsaw and can do pretty good work with it. For cutting the 4x4
though, it wouldn't be my first choice. Circular saw and speed square would
be it.




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Old March 18th 07, 06:36 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?

CW wrote:
snip

Odd, J Clark actually catching the point.


Screw you very much. plonk

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  #44   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 04:23 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 10,043
Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?


wrote in message

Hmm, moving it out away from the fence is a thought. I'll give that
option a try as well.


Just to reiterate because of a safety issue ... be sure to use, as John
suggested, an auxiliary fence if you do. The piece being cut needs to be
against a "fence" during the cut, even it is just a board between the saw
fence and the workpiece.


--
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Last update: 2/20/07



  #45   Report Post  
Old March 19th 07, 03:04 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 622
Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?

CW wrote:
"J. Clarke" wrote in message
...
CW wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...
On Mar 16, 1:02 pm, wrote:
Ok, I've tried cutting the end with a sawzall, the ends come out
uneven. I tried with a circular, I can't ever seem to get the cuts
to line up when I flip the wood to do the other side. And the miter
saw I have just isn't big enough.

I've resorted to having Home Depot cut them there, but they don't do
precision cuts, and sometimes they are too busy and I don't want to
wait.

Add in the fact that sooner or later I'm going to have rough sawn
4x4 that I will have to cut myself regardless.

Besides buying a really big miter/radial arm saw, any suggestions?
Handsaw, chainsaw, or a Prazi-beam cutter attachment for a
circular saw. Or you can use the method one of my neighbors
uses--find a neighbor to do it for you.

If you chose a handsaw try to find an antique Disston crosscut
saw with maybe 8 points and sharpen it yourself. Joint it first
and set it after if it needs it, often they do not. Most off-the
shelf
handsaws are not really sharp, set too coarse, and with teeth
that are two fine. A 4 point ripsaw will crosscut quickly too,
but leave a rougher kerf.

You could also design and build a 16" radial arm saw. Maybe a
guillotine with a 50 pound blade and a hundred foot drop. How about a
large lathe, steady rest and a part off tool? There is all kinds of
ways to overcomplicate this if you think about it long enough.

Using a sharp handsaw isn't "overcomplicating"--it used to be that
sharpening one's saw was just part of daily life--my father sharpened
his saws regularly and he wasn't even a carpenter by trade, he was a
sailor. The trouble is that modern Western-pattern saws are either very
expensive or not very good and finding an old Disston in decent shape
may be difficult. A 40 buck ryoba with a throw-away blade works
remarkably well and is readily accessible.

Odd, J Clark actually catching the point. Got to say though, I have a modern
Stanley handsaw and can do pretty good work with it. For cutting the 4x4
though, it wouldn't be my first choice. Circular saw and speed square would
be it.



I'd use a 'camp' saw (small bow saw). Th blade is long enough (and
straight) to get a good line up on the cutting line.

The OP could take some off each end and use the best end up.

Bill (who has other ways to cut a 4by that apparently the OP does not.)


--
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is worth (much) unless backed up with enough genuine information to make
him really know what he's talking about.

H. P. Lovecraft

http://nmwoodworks.com


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  #46   Report Post  
Old March 24th 07, 02:47 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?

On Mar 17, 10:13´┐Żam, wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 16:25:19 -0400, "Locutus"





wrote:

"Father Haskell" wrote in message
roups.com...
On Mar 16, 3:15 pm, "Locutus" wrote:
"Father Haskell" wrote in message


groups.com...


On Mar 16, 12:52 pm, "Pop`" wrote:
wrote:
Ok, I've tried cutting the end with a sawzall, the ends come out
uneven. I tried with a circular, I can't ever seem to get the cuts
to
line up when I flip the wood to do the other side. And the miter saw
I
have just isn't big enough.


I've resorted to having Home Depot cut them there, but they don't do
precision cuts, and sometimes they are too busy and I don't want to
wait.


Add in the fact that sooner or later I'm going to have rough sawn
4x4
that I will have to cut myself regardless.


Besides buying a really big miter/radial arm saw, any suggestions?


Either get more accurate with your skilsaw or use a power sander on
the
cuts. *This is sort of silly.


Especially since dead square post tops are undesirable. *Chamfered or
sloped tops don't hold rainwater, and will last longer.


The OP never said anything about post tops...


Why would anyone want to cut the part that sits buried under 3 feet
of
concrete square?


LOL, the OP just stated he wanted to know how to cut a 4x4 post!!! Unless I
missed a post somewhere, he didn't specify if it were in the ground.
Considering he said he has Home Depot cut them for him, I don't imagine they
are.


It's for a bed post, sorry if I led anyone astray. Although I'm
learning a lot about other techniques even if not for my application.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


And this is why Stanley, and others, used to make hand saw miter boxes
with backsaws that had blades 30" long x 6" deep. Not many still
around, and a decade or so ago when they could still be found, they
were commanding very high prices...I seem to recall seeing one at
around $350.

To get the same capacity, you need to go to a sliding compound miter
saw with a 12" blade, if you insist on power. If you're used to using
a handsaw, it's fairly easy to do freehand if you mark carefully and
follow the marks. With the big Stanley, it's as easy as it gets. With
an SCMS it is even easier, but you're looking at about $600 for the
saw, and the blade that comes with it has a 50-50 chance of being
aimed at the construction market, so you can earmark anywhere from $90
to $150 for a new blade. In truth, I think I'd pop for a decent
handsaw at maybe $45.

  #47   Report Post  
Old March 24th 07, 03:29 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,407
Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
ups.com...
And this is why Stanley, and others, used to make hand saw miter boxes
with backsaws that had blades 30" long x 6" deep. Not many still
around, and a decade or so ago when they could still be found, they
were commanding very high prices...I seem to recall seeing one at
around $350.

To get the same capacity, you need to go to a sliding compound miter
saw with a 12" blade, if you insist on power. If you're used to using
a handsaw, it's fairly easy to do freehand if you mark carefully and
follow the marks. With the big Stanley, it's as easy as it gets.

No operation with a hand saw is easy on pressure-treated lumber.

  #48   Report Post  
Old March 24th 07, 03:30 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 442
Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Mar 17, 10:13?am, wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 16:25:19 -0400, "Locutus"





wrote:

snip


follow the marks. With the big Stanley, it's as easy as it gets. With
an SCMS it is even easier, but you're looking at about $600 for the
saw, and the blade that comes with it has a 50-50 chance of being
aimed at the construction market, so you can earmark anywhere from $90
to $150 for a new blade. In truth, I think I'd pop for a decent
handsaw at maybe $45.


Or a $14 Disston handsaw from Ebay, sharpened by Circle Saw (less than $10,
I think $4), and then stone the side of the teeth to even the set, and
you'll have a saw that is sharp and will stay in it's kerf. Sometimes a
commercial sharpening will leave filings on the edges that need to be stoned
off. It takes 2 or 3 minutes to do that.
I have a 1950's Craftsman saw, 10 tpi, that is sharpened as a rip saw, that
cuts cross cut or rip, just like Tage Frid said to do. It's the saw I pick
up more than others.


  #49   Report Post  
Old March 25th 07, 12:53 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 2
Default How do I cut a 4x4 post?


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Mar 17, 10:13?am, wrote:
On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 16:25:19 -0400, "Locutus"





wrote:

"Father Haskell" wrote in message
roups.com...
On Mar 16, 3:15 pm, "Locutus" wrote:
"Father Haskell" wrote in message


groups.com...


On Mar 16, 12:52 pm, "Pop`" wrote:
wrote:
Ok, I've tried cutting the end with a sawzall, the ends come out
uneven. I tried with a circular, I can't ever seem to get the
cuts
to
line up when I flip the wood to do the other side. And the miter
saw
I
have just isn't big enough.


I've resorted to having Home Depot cut them there, but they don't
do
precision cuts, and sometimes they are too busy and I don't want
to
wait.


Add in the fact that sooner or later I'm going to have rough sawn
4x4
that I will have to cut myself regardless.


Besides buying a really big miter/radial arm saw, any
suggestions?


Either get more accurate with your skilsaw or use a power sander on
the
cuts. This is sort of silly.


Especially since dead square post tops are undesirable. Chamfered or
sloped tops don't hold rainwater, and will last longer.


The OP never said anything about post tops...


Why would anyone want to cut the part that sits buried under 3 feet
of
concrete square?


LOL, the OP just stated he wanted to know how to cut a 4x4 post!!! Unless
I
missed a post somewhere, he didn't specify if it were in the ground.
Considering he said he has Home Depot cut them for him, I don't imagine
they
are.


It's for a bed post, sorry if I led anyone astray. Although I'm
learning a lot about other techniques even if not for my application.-
Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Or buy a Festool Jig Saw. Great capacity and a very square cut.




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