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Default Kitchen cabinet doors. Any reason not to do this?

All but of couple of my upper doors are true divided lite. To make
these I purchased the freud 99-270 router bit set. For the lower doors
and drawer faces and two upper doors I was planing on flat panel
construction with the panel fitting into a grove in the rail and
stiles. The divided lite set won't make this type. It doesn't cut a
groove but a rabbit. Is it inappropriate to mount panels in a rabbit
and apply some kind of backing around the edge to hold it in just like
they were glass panels. I can't imagine why this won't work. But,
want to be sure before I mess up some expensive wood. Also, I want
things to look good and be "right". Would I be better off getting a
rail and stile set with a matching profile (its a plain cove) and go
that way?
Mike in Arkansas who is recovered from the kickback incident except for
a mighty itch near the ribs.

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Default Kitchen cabinet doors. Any reason not to do this?


Mike in Arkansas wrote:
All but of couple of my upper doors are true divided lite. To make
these I purchased the freud 99-270 router bit set. For the lower doors
and drawer faces and two upper doors I was planing on flat panel
construction with the panel fitting into a grove in the rail and
stiles. The divided lite set won't make this type. It doesn't cut a
groove but a rabbit. Is it inappropriate to mount panels in a rabbit
and apply some kind of backing around the edge to hold it in just like
they were glass panels. I can't imagine why this won't work. But,
want to be sure before I mess up some expensive wood. Also, I want
things to look good and be "right". Would I be better off getting a
rail and stile set with a matching profile (its a plain cove) and go
that way?
Mike in Arkansas who is recovered from the kickback incident except for
a mighty itch near the ribs.


Is it possible to return the router bit set and get the right one? We
normally use a panel bit set to make frames for glass doors. Then use
a rabbit bit to remove the 1/4 back rail. This does require cutting
the corners with a chisel

In answer to your question, yes you could do it as you described. If
you have ever tried working with 1/4" quarter round, you will find it
challenging.

-Lee

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Default Kitchen cabinet doors. Any reason not to do this?

On 3 Nov 2006 20:55:16 -0800, "Mike in Arkansas"
wrote:

All but of couple of my upper doors are true divided lite. To make
these I purchased the freud 99-270 router bit set. For the lower doors
and drawer faces and two upper doors I was planing on flat panel
construction with the panel fitting into a grove in the rail and
stiles. The divided lite set won't make this type. It doesn't cut a
groove but a rabbit. Is it inappropriate to mount panels in a rabbit
and apply some kind of backing around the edge to hold it in just like
they were glass panels. I can't imagine why this won't work. But,
want to be sure before I mess up some expensive wood. Also, I want
things to look good and be "right". Would I be better off getting a
rail and stile set with a matching profile (its a plain cove) and go
that way?


Well, Mike- I'm assuming you have a table saw from your mention of the
kickback incident below (glad to hear you're recovering.) So why not
rout the cove with a regular cove bit, then cut the dadoes with your
table saw? Even if you don't have a dado stack, you can do it with a
single blade and multiple passes- that's the way I've done it a lot of
times, and it works fine.

There's nothing really "inappropriate" about mounting the panels in a
rabbet, but it will not look as good as setting them in dadoes. If
you really just prefer to use the router method, or don't have a cove
bit, you could make the rails and stiles a little thinner (if that
will work with your bit set), rout the rabbet, set the panel in place,
and then glue a second thin set of rails and stiles to the back to
effectively make a dado without cutting one.

Mike in Arkansas who is recovered from the kickback incident except for
a mighty itch near the ribs.


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Default Kitchen cabinet doors. Any reason not to do this?


Prometheus wrote:
set the panel in place,
and then glue a second thin set of rails and stiles to the back to
effectively make a dado without cutting one.

Two interesting solutions Prometheus. Thanks for your input. I do
have a table saw so cutting the dado isn't a problem. Your suggestion
just made me realize that my rail and stile bit set comes apart so I
can simply replace the rabbeting cutter with spacers and have a
perfectly matched cove. Doh! Honestly, sometimes I can be such a
dolt. Thanks for fire by the way.
Mike in Arkansas

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