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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Actually, this question is more generic than just curly maple, but that
happens to be the wood I'm using for this project.

Okay, I had some cherry. We sanded it nicely, cleaned it up, then put
wood conditioner on it before staining it. (Yes ... I know ... some
people would ask WHY stain cherry?). We could see the conditioner being
absorbed better in some spots than others.

Upon staining it, it was very splotchy. Extremely so. We attributed
the splotchy look to the uneven absorption of the wood conditioner. That
assumption may or may not have any relevance to the real cause.

So I had some nice curly maple on hand, and started to redo the project
using that. It's been sanded down very nicely, 60 grit, 90 grit, 120
grit, 150 grit, then 180 grit. It's a smooth as glass right now.

We just put wood conditioner on it, and again we can see an uneven
absorption.

So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the
others? We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks
nice and warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning
of some sort.

Any suggestions?

Jack

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Woodhead
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

I believe you are in for it............. Trying to get even color on a
figured wood doesn't emphasize the figure. I used two different stains on
curley maple. The darker one 1st then sanded it well and then the lighter
stain. Had to experiment a bit with different stains to get the look I
wanted, but it was gorgeous!

Jim

"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote
in message ...
Actually, this question is more generic than just curly maple, but that
happens to be the wood I'm using for this project.

Okay, I had some cherry. We sanded it nicely, cleaned it up, then put wood
conditioner on it before staining it. (Yes ... I know ... some people
would ask WHY stain cherry?). We could see the conditioner being absorbed
better in some spots than others.

Upon staining it, it was very splotchy. Extremely so. We attributed the
splotchy look to the uneven absorption of the wood conditioner. That
assumption may or may not have any relevance to the real cause.

So I had some nice curly maple on hand, and started to redo the project
using that. It's been sanded down very nicely, 60 grit, 90 grit, 120
grit, 150 grit, then 180 grit. It's a smooth as glass right now.

We just put wood conditioner on it, and again we can see an uneven
absorption.

So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the others?
We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks nice and
warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning of some
sort.

Any suggestions?

Jack



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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple


mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
Actually, this question is more generic than just curly maple, but that
happens to be the wood I'm using for this project.

...

Upon staining it, it was very splotchy.
...
So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the
others? We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks
nice and warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning
of some sort.

Any suggestions?


I suggest toning instead of staining.

Use a colored film finish, like a colored lacquer or colored
shellac. It won't be absorbed at all into the wood, so
it won't be blotchy.

You can buy oil-based, water based or alcohol based
analine dyes to mix in with a nominally clear finish.

--

FF

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Prometheus
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

On Wed, 14 Jun 2006 16:45:50 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:

So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the
others? We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks
nice and warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning
of some sort.


Oh man. I can forgive the cherry staining, but curly maple? Now
you're going too far. Cherry's ok I guess, but Maple deserves more
respect than that, you heathen!

Have you considered something like amber or garnet shellac? Nothing
stopping you from putting something else over it if you need to, and
it will bring out the figure better than any kind of stain.

But don't stain it. It will be blotchy, and look like junk.
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Mike Marlow
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple


"Prometheus" wrote in message
...


Oh man. I can forgive the cherry staining, but curly maple? Now
you're going too far. Cherry's ok I guess, but Maple deserves more
respect than that, you heathen!

Have you considered something like amber or garnet shellac? Nothing
stopping you from putting something else over it if you need to, and
it will bring out the figure better than any kind of stain.

But don't stain it. It will be blotchy, and look like junk.


Oh man - you really have to look at some of the beautiful guitars turned out
by Terry McInturff. (mcinturffguitars.com). There's some colors that I
might not order if I were to ever order another custom guitar, but as for
stain over quilted maple - he's got some beautiful stuff.

--

-Mike-





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henry
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Did you put the conditioner on and stain right after without letting
the conditioner dry?

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George
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple


"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote
in message ...
Okay, I had some cherry. We sanded it nicely, cleaned it up, then put wood
conditioner on it before staining it. (Yes ... I know ... some people
would ask WHY stain cherry?). We could see the conditioner being absorbed
better in some spots than others.

Upon staining it, it was very splotchy. Extremely so. We attributed the
splotchy look to the uneven absorption of the wood conditioner. That
assumption may or may not have any relevance to the real cause.

So I had some nice curly maple on hand, and started to redo the project
using that. It's been sanded down very nicely, 60 grit, 90 grit, 120
grit, 150 grit, then 180 grit. It's a smooth as glass right now.

We just put wood conditioner on it, and again we can see an uneven
absorption.

So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the others?
We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks nice and
warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning of some
sort.


Well, the grain being as convoluted as it is, it'll look uneven for the
first couple of coats, but I'd dye it and then finish, personally. Talked
to my SiL yesterday, who was putting finish on their bed that we made here
(do you realize how BIG a king size is?) , and he was a bit concerned that
the cherry was taking the finish unevenly. I told him to get the second
coat on first. Called today, and is pleased. He just wouldn't believe my
daughter, who told him that "dad makes cherry stuff all the time, and this
is how it looks."


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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple


George wrote:
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote
in message ...
...

So I had some nice curly maple on hand, and started to redo the project
using that. It's been sanded down very nicely, 60 grit, 90 grit, 120
grit, 150 grit, then 180 grit. It's a smooth as glass right now.

We just put wood conditioner on it, and again we can see an uneven
absorption.


You will.


So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the others?
We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks nice and
warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning of some
sort.


Well, the grain being as convoluted as it is, it'll look uneven for the
first couple of coats, but I'd dye it and then finish, personally. Talked
to my SiL yesterday, who was putting finish on their bed that we made here
(do you realize how BIG a king size is?) , and he was a bit concerned that
the cherry was taking the finish unevenly. I told him to get the second
coat on first. Called today, and is pleased. He just wouldn't believe my
daughter, who told him that "dad makes cherry stuff all the time, and this
is how it looks."


Stain and dye are two different ways to color wood. Stain is finely
divided
solid pigment in a base that will stick it to the wood. Proper use of
stain
is to rub it into the wood and them wipe off the excess by wiping in
the
direction of the grain. This will leave the pores of the wood filled
with the
pigment and will minimize the 'muddiness' associated with stained wood.
If the first application of stain is done that way, subnsequent
applications
will have no effect because with the pores having been filled by the
first application all of the new stain will be wiped off during the
second.
Staining also kills the chatoyance (iridescence) of figured wood
like curly maple.

A dye is a liquid that will penetrate slightly into the wood. It will
not
obscure the grain at all and does not reduce the chatoyance.

Some people will dye figured wood then scrape or sand down to
remove the wood from the parts where it has penetrated the least.
This can highlight the figure. The same can be done with stain, but
with the loss of the chatoyance.

Toning, that is use of a colored film finish will not highlight the
figure nor destroy the chatoyance but of course a dark finish
will generally obscure the grain altogether.

Woods can also be colored by using chemicals that react with the
wood. I forget what this is called. Sodium hydroxide (lye) is the
easiest to get and use. DAGS this newsgroup for how. It darkens
cherry quite well and also affects maple, pine, Doug Fir and
sassafrass.
You may or may not like the affect on those others. The strength
of the color change depends on the strength of the solution.

--

FF

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Prometheus
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 07:22:32 -0400, "Mike Marlow"
wrote:


"Prometheus" wrote in message
.. .


Oh man. I can forgive the cherry staining, but curly maple? Now
you're going too far. Cherry's ok I guess, but Maple deserves more
respect than that, you heathen!

Have you considered something like amber or garnet shellac? Nothing
stopping you from putting something else over it if you need to, and
it will bring out the figure better than any kind of stain.

But don't stain it. It will be blotchy, and look like junk.


Oh man - you really have to look at some of the beautiful guitars turned out
by Terry McInturff. (mcinturffguitars.com). There's some colors that I
might not order if I were to ever order another custom guitar, but as for
stain over quilted maple - he's got some beautiful stuff.




It was sorta tongue-in-cheek. That being said, it's a bear to stain
evenly- I won't even attempt it anymore.
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Ah, that's exactly what another friend told me. He suggested I try a
couple variations of shellac to see which gives us the best effect.

Thanks!

Jack

Prometheus wrote:
On Wed, 14 Jun 2006 16:45:50 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:


So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the
others? We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks
nice and warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning
of some sort.



Oh man. I can forgive the cherry staining, but curly maple? Now
you're going too far. Cherry's ok I guess, but Maple deserves more
respect than that, you heathen!

Have you considered something like amber or garnet shellac? Nothing
stopping you from putting something else over it if you need to, and
it will bring out the figure better than any kind of stain.

But don't stain it. It will be blotchy, and look like junk.




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Steve Peterson
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Where are you? I will buy some regular maple and trade you; how much should
I get?

Steve


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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Heh ... live in Los Alamos. With our history of atomic research, they
really should come up with some wood that glows in the dark here.

Steve Peterson wrote:
Where are you? I will buy some regular maple and trade you; how much should
I get?

Steve



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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

Heh ... live in Los Alamos. With our history of atomic research, they
really should come up with some wood that glows in the dark here.

Steve Peterson wrote:
Where are you? I will buy some regular maple and trade you; how much should
I get?

Steve



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cdo
 
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Default Getting an even stain on curly maple

On Wed, 14 Jun 2006 16:45:50 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:

Actually, this question is more generic than just curly maple, but that
happens to be the wood I'm using for this project.

Okay, I had some cherry. We sanded it nicely, cleaned it up, then put
wood conditioner on it before staining it. (Yes ... I know ... some
people would ask WHY stain cherry?). We could see the conditioner being
absorbed better in some spots than others.

Upon staining it, it was very splotchy. Extremely so. We attributed
the splotchy look to the uneven absorption of the wood conditioner. That
assumption may or may not have any relevance to the real cause.

So I had some nice curly maple on hand, and started to redo the project
using that. It's been sanded down very nicely, 60 grit, 90 grit, 120
grit, 150 grit, then 180 grit. It's a smooth as glass right now.

We just put wood conditioner on it, and again we can see an uneven
absorption.

So ... what's the best approach to getting a nice even stain on curly
maple? Is there any particular stain that applies better than the
others? We're open to using pretty much anything as long as it looks
nice and warm. Could be transluscent, solid, or even just a nice toning
of some sort.

Any suggestions?

Jack



Read FWW #135 - "Pop the Curl in Curly Maple" by Jeff Jewitt. His
2-step method with the dyes really works well; the figure stands out
beautifully and the iridescence of the wood will amaze you. It's not
all that hard to do either (important to a finish challanged w-worker
like me...)

Cliff
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