Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
 
Posts: n/a
Default What makes a chair a chair?

Being relatively new to woodworking, and having never built a chair,
I've decided to give one a try. Square parts, because I don't have a
lathe, and I'd like to try something with a caned seat, because I've
never done that either. This brings me to my question.

What makes a dining chair a dining chair? Same thing with a vanity
chair, a writing chair, a desk chair, a parlor chair, a porch chair and
the like? Is it just stylistic elements? For instance, do dining
chairs by definition have to have a (back) and a (seat) or certain
geometry or (no) arms or be made of (wood) finished with (finish)?

Let's say I build a chair that I like, but isn't "suited" to my
application? I don't have one in mind right now--in fact, I'll
probably give the first one away if it doesn't go on the firewood pile.
All other things being equal, if by extending this piece a few inches
or finishing with shellac, I get an According-to-Hoyle (type) chair,
why not do that? I know that there are lots of folks who say, "Build
what you like, the hell with the rest of 'em." I, too, am one of those
folks, but there are people out there who've spent a lot more time than
me on this subject, and I'd like to think that a dining chair is a
dining chair for a REASON. If the voices tell me that that reason
makes sense, then I'll try to be faithful to it. If not, I'll "Build
what I like, the hell with the rest of 'em."

Ladies and gentlemen, I await your discourse.


BTW, a Google Search revealed this:

Design a Chair hat Fits like a Glove", FWW Issue #96, Oct 1992, pp
88-91.
Author Glenn Gordon

Details the construction and use of a chair-fitting rig used by John
and
Carolyn Grew-Sheridan
who build chairs somewhere in San Francisco, according to the article.


Anyone have this issue who could scan and email or copy and mail? I'd
appreciate it. FWW doesn't carry back issues that far, um, back.

-Phil Crow

  #2   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Swingman
 
Posts: n/a
Default What makes a chair a chair?

wrote in message

This brings me to my question.


Depends ... to the point that social engineering with chairs is common
place, and may have always been.

http://tinyurl.com/9sfap

Modern examples include the fact that chain restaurant chairs are routinely
designed to only be comfortable for so many minutes to guarantee turnover,
and you can be sued if the chair you supply your workers causes health
probems.

There are time honored ergomonics involved that are worth taking into
account when designing a chair for your own use. Height, and width, of the
seat; backrest generally angles away from the seat 5 - 7 degrees; the front
of the seat is usually wider than the back, etc. There is a world of
information on chair design and ergonomics.

http://www.individualfurniture.com/maker/design.htm

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05



  #3   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Lowell Holmes
 
Posts: n/a
Default What makes a chair a chair?


wrote in message
ups.com...
Being relatively new to woodworking, and having never built a chair,
I've decided to give one a try. Square parts, because I don't have a
lathe, and I'd like to try something with a caned seat, because I've
never done that either. This brings me to my question.

What makes a dining chair a dining chair? Same thing with a vanity
chair, a writing chair, a desk chair, a parlor chair, a porch chair and
the like? Is it just stylistic elements? For instance, do dining
chairs by definition have to have a (back) and a (seat) or certain
geometry or (no) arms or be made of (wood) finished with (finish)?

Let's say I build a chair that I like, but isn't "suited" to my
application? I don't have one in mind right now--in fact, I'll
probably give the first one away if it doesn't go on the firewood pile.
All other things being equal, if by extending this piece a few inches
or finishing with shellac, I get an According-to-Hoyle (type) chair,
why not do that? I know that there are lots of folks who say, "Build
what you like, the hell with the rest of 'em." I, too, am one of those
folks, but there are people out there who've spent a lot more time than
me on this subject, and I'd like to think that a dining chair is a
dining chair for a REASON. If the voices tell me that that reason
makes sense, then I'll try to be faithful to it. If not, I'll "Build
what I like, the hell with the rest of 'em."

Ladies and gentlemen, I await your discourse.

BTW, a Google Search revealed this:

Design a Chair hat Fits like a Glove", FWW Issue #96, Oct 1992, pp
88-91.
Author Glenn Gordon

Details the construction and use of a chair-fitting rig used by John
and
Carolyn Grew-Sheridan
who build chairs somewhere in San Francisco, according to the article.


Anyone have this issue who could scan and email or copy and mail? I'd
appreciate it. FWW doesn't carry back issues that far, um, back.

-Phil Crow



Phil,
Just go build a chair. You will answer all your questions yourself. If
you'll excuse me now, I've got to go finish a glue up for a rocking chair
that I'm building. :-)

OBTW, you might look for a book by Jeff MIller, it will answer your
questions. Taunton Press publishes it. He has a tape out also. Don't quibble
over the cost of the book or tape, the price for the wood will bring tears
to your eyes.


  #5   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Phisherman
 
Posts: n/a
Default What makes a chair a chair?

On 12 Feb 2006 07:28:54 -0800, wrote:

Being relatively new to woodworking, and having never built a chair,
I've decided to give one a try. Square parts, because I don't have a
lathe, and I'd like to try something with a caned seat, because I've
never done that either. This brings me to my question.


You don't need a lathe to make round parts. I have made perfect chair
legs using a jig and a router. I've seen woodworkers make round parts
using a horse, spokeshaves, and a little skill.


What makes a dining chair a dining chair?


Any chair you use while eating is a dining chair.

Same thing with a vanity
chair, a writing chair, a desk chair, a parlor chair, a porch chair and
the like?


Here too. Although we get into specific features. A desk chair will
often have arms for comfort. A porch chair might be a little rustic
and made from wood types that stand up well to the elements.

Is it just stylistic elements?


Sometimes
For instance, do dining
chairs by definition have to have a (back) and a (seat) or certain
geometry or (no) arms or be made of (wood) finished with (finish)?


Dining chairs are usually smaller than other chairs, and the ones with
arms made such they can be pushed under the table.

Let's say I build a chair that I like, but isn't "suited" to my
application?


I have made things that don't have a purpose, perhaps a work of art,
but not that often.

I don't have one in mind right now--in fact, I'll
probably give the first one away if it doesn't go on the firewood pile.
All other things being equal, if by extending this piece a few inches
or finishing with shellac, I get an According-to-Hoyle (type) chair,
why not do that? I know that there are lots of folks who say, "Build
what you like, the hell with the rest of 'em." I, too, am one of those
folks, but there are people out there who've spent a lot more time than
me on this subject, and I'd like to think that a dining chair is a
dining chair for a REASON. If the voices tell me that that reason
makes sense, then I'll try to be faithful to it. If not, I'll "Build
what I like, the hell with the rest of 'em."


All I can say is make a chair strong enough the fat lady can use and
you'll be fine. Well made chairs take some skill, and not exactly
something for a beginner.


Ladies and gentlemen, I await your discourse.


BTW, a Google Search revealed this:

Design a Chair hat Fits like a Glove", FWW Issue #96, Oct 1992, pp
88-91.
Author Glenn Gordon

Details the construction and use of a chair-fitting rig used by John
and
Carolyn Grew-Sheridan
who build chairs somewhere in San Francisco, according to the article.


Anyone have this issue who could scan and email or copy and mail? I'd
appreciate it. FWW doesn't carry back issues that far, um, back.

-Phil Crow



  #6   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Morris Dovey
 
Posts: n/a
Default What makes a chair a chair?

(in
) said:

| Being relatively new to woodworking, and having never built a chair,
| I've decided to give one a try. Square parts, because I don't have
| a lathe, and I'd like to try something with a caned seat, because
| I've never done that either. This brings me to my question.
|
| What makes a dining chair a dining chair? Same thing with a vanity
| chair, a writing chair, a desk chair, a parlor chair, a porch chair
| and the like? Is it just stylistic elements? For instance, do
| dining chairs by definition have to have a (back) and a (seat) or
| certain geometry or (no) arms or be made of (wood) finished with
| (finish)?

If it rests on the floor/ground; if it supports both your butt and
your back while allowing you to rest your feet on the ground; and if
it does all these wonderful things for one person at a time - it's a
chair.

(I'm not going to argue about highchairs or barber chairs or dentist's
chairs.)

| Let's say I build a chair that I like, but isn't "suited" to my
| application? I don't have one in mind right now--in fact, I'll
| probably give the first one away if it doesn't go on the firewood
| pile. All other things being equal, if by extending this piece a
| few inches or finishing with shellac, I get an According-to-Hoyle
| (type) chair, why not do that? I know that there are lots of folks
| who say, "Build what you like, the hell with the rest of 'em." I,
| too, am one of those folks, but there are people out there who've
| spent a lot more time than me on this subject, and I'd like to
| think that a dining chair is a dining chair for a REASON. If the
| voices tell me that that reason makes sense, then I'll try to be
| faithful to it. If not, I'll "Build what I like, the hell with the
| rest of 'em."

Hmm. Do you have these kinds of converstaions frequently? ;-)

| Ladies and gentlemen, I await your discourse.

I'm neither - and I think you may be overthinking all this just a wee
bit. If you wanna build a chair, then just /do/ it! If you don't like
the result, call it "an experiment" and build a better one. Repeat as
necessary until you can say: "Damn I'm good!"

Take notes and pictures along the way and share what you learn.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rocking chair conversion Jay Pique Woodworking 0 November 13th 05 05:14 PM
material similar to plastic chair mats to cover all carpet in my apartment Mark Home Repair 2 August 16th 05 08:58 PM
material similar to plastic chair mats to cover all carpet in my living room Mark Home Ownership 10 August 16th 05 06:50 PM
How to fix old chair with worn mortise and tenon joints? Scott Duncan Woodworking 5 May 9th 04 03:31 PM
Who Makes What Tools Gunner Metalworking 7 March 27th 04 10:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:18 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"