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  #1   Report Post  
AndyB
 
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Default Need Advice on Moving Table Saw ***


I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

Any and all advice would be appreciated.

TO REPLY BY EMAIL REMOVE THE STRING "SPAMNOT"
FROM MY REPLY ADDRESS. Sorry for that hassles,
but spammers make it necessary.

Thanks in advance,
AndyB
  #2   Report Post  
Clint
 
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Default

When I moved my saw, I removed the motor. First of all, because it's heavy,
and anything I could get off the saw to make the main part lighter and more
manageable was good. Secondly, because the motor on my saw is on a hinge,
allowing the motor weight to tension the belt, and the thought of the motor
bouncing up and down, slamming against it's stop didn't seem like a good
idea.

Why do you have to rewire your saw to take the motor off? If you do have to
rewire the saw, I'd suggest doing it something like my GI contractor saw...
That is, the motor isn't wired directly to the switch; there's a plug type
connection between them. This allows the motor to be easily disconnected
from the saw. Should be easy to retrofit something like that, and you could
even get a locking type connector to make sure it only came disconnected
when you wanted it to.

Clint

"AndyB" wrote in message
...

I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

Any and all advice would be appreciated.

TO REPLY BY EMAIL REMOVE THE STRING "SPAMNOT"
FROM MY REPLY ADDRESS. Sorry for that hassles,
but spammers make it necessary.

Thanks in advance,
AndyB



  #3   Report Post  
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
 
Posts: n/a
Default

AndyB wrote:
My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.



I don't think I'd have a problem moving it intact, assuming you can handle the
strain of getting it in and out of the truck. As for the motor bouncing up and
down, you can keep it from doing that by buying a roll of plastic shipper's tape
and applying it liberally. That stuff has a 1000 uses, and is much less likely
to stretch or tear than duct tape.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN




  #4   Report Post  
Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"AndyB" wrote in message
...

I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I wouldn't leave it hanging there.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

As I see it, you have two choices:
1. Use a rope to support the motor. I would not expect the drive belt to
support the motor while it is in the truck.
2. It is rewire time.
Jim

Any and all advice would be appreciated.

TO REPLY BY EMAIL REMOVE THE STRING "SPAMNOT"
FROM MY REPLY ADDRESS. Sorry for that hassles,
but spammers make it necessary.

Thanks in advance,
AndyB



  #5   Report Post  
Leon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"AndyB" wrote in message
...
Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.




I would lean more toward removing the motor before removing the wings and
fence rails. What you have done so far is way more work than disconnecting
a few wire connections. Leave the wiring in place and simply disconnect the
wiring from the motor. The motor as it is way too much weight to be
banging around off the back side of your saw.




  #6   Report Post  
Mike Marlow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"AndyB" wrote in message
...

I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)


Always fun, huh?


My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.


It will be fine. Do yourself a favor before you go putting all sorts of
stuff on that motor to "secure" it... Grab the motor and lift it. Take
some effort? Do you really expect to subject the saw to the amount of
energy to lift that heavy motor on your drive? No - of course not. You'd
be rattling your teeth out. Your bearings and everything else associated
with that motor hanging off there are subject to a lot more forces than
you're going to expose it to during a ride in your truck.

--

-Mike-



  #7   Report Post  
TomWoodman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If the weight of the motor is being carried by the belts, I wouldn't expect
the bearings to last very long.
BTW... what kind of movers are you using anyway?
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"AndyB" wrote in message
...

I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)


Always fun, huh?


My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.


It will be fine. Do yourself a favor before you go putting all sorts of
stuff on that motor to "secure" it... Grab the motor and lift it. Take
some effort? Do you really expect to subject the saw to the amount of
energy to lift that heavy motor on your drive? No - of course not. You'd
be rattling your teeth out. Your bearings and everything else associated
with that motor hanging off there are subject to a lot more forces than
you're going to expose it to during a ride in your truck.

--

-Mike-





  #8   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"TomWoodman" wrote in message
...
If the weight of the motor is being carried by the belts, I wouldn't
expect the bearings to last very long.


Why not? Isn't every belt driven tool using a motor loaded that way?


  #9   Report Post  
Leon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...


It will be fine. Do yourself a favor before you go putting all sorts of
stuff on that motor to "secure" it... Grab the motor and lift it. Take
some effort? Do you really expect to subject the saw to the amount of
energy to lift that heavy motor on your drive? No - of course not. You'd
be rattling your teeth out. Your bearings and everything else associated
with that motor hanging off there are subject to a lot more forces than
you're going to expose it to during a ride in your truck.


Around the block would be OK but a 30 minute commute? You can bet there
will be plenty of opportunities for the vehicle to undulate causing the
motor to bounce around. Typically going through an intersection on a green
light is enough to bounce the motor.
The force you describe on the bearing during normal operation is totally
different from the force of exerted in this type application. The bearings
would be the leas of my worries. I would worry more about breaking a
trunion.


  #10   Report Post  
Unquestionably Confused
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Leon wrote:
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

ruck.


Around the block would be OK but a 30 minute commute? You can bet there
will be plenty of opportunities for the vehicle to undulate causing the
motor to bounce around. Typically going through an intersection on a green
light is enough to bounce the motor.
The force you describe on the bearing during normal operation is totally
different from the force of exerted in this type application. The bearings
would be the leas of my worries. I would worry more about breaking a
trunion.


How did your saw arrive at the dealership, etc. from Taiwan? Motor
assembled, hung from trunnion? Blocked? Repeat that and forget about
all the doomsayers.






  #11   Report Post  
Greg O
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"AndyB" wrote in message
...

I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)



The last time I moved my TS, I removed any lose items, fence, that type of
thing. Slid it over to the back of the pickup, and rolled it into the truck,
flipping it over as I did so. A contractors saw will travel nicely upside
down, laid on its top, plus you don't need to worry about it tipping over as
the heavy parts are now at the bottom.
Greg


  #12   Report Post  
Terry Sumner
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ummm..Are we forgetting that, before the advent of all these
lightweight saws for contractors like the Bosch and DeWalt,
etc....contractors all over the country used to haul around those
contractor type saws with no problems that I ever heard of. Heck, my
old Delta contractor's saw banged around in my pickup for years with
nothing supporting the motor and it ran just fine.

Terry
  #13   Report Post  
Frank Boettcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 02 Oct 2005 16:46:38 GMT, AndyB
wrote:


I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

Any and all advice would be appreciated.

TO REPLY BY EMAIL REMOVE THE STRING "SPAMNOT"
FROM MY REPLY ADDRESS. Sorry for that hassles,
but spammers make it necessary.

Thanks in advance,
AndyB


It should make the trip just like it is without a problem. However if
you are worried lift the motor up, slide the belt off the arbor
pulley, and let the motor rotate down and tie it off to the stand.
Newer models have a quick electric disconnect and spring pins to
quickly remove the motor, but you indicated yours was Rockwell badged
so the quick disconnect would not be on yours.

Frank
  #14   Report Post  
Mike Marlow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Leon" wrote in message
...

"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...


It will be fine. Do yourself a favor before you go putting all sorts of
stuff on that motor to "secure" it... Grab the motor and lift it. Take
some effort? Do you really expect to subject the saw to the amount of
energy to lift that heavy motor on your drive? No - of course not.

You'd
be rattling your teeth out. Your bearings and everything else

associated
with that motor hanging off there are subject to a lot more forces than
you're going to expose it to during a ride in your truck.


Around the block would be OK but a 30 minute commute? You can bet there
will be plenty of opportunities for the vehicle to undulate causing the
motor to bounce around. Typically going through an intersection on a

green
light is enough to bounce the motor.
The force you describe on the bearing during normal operation is totally
different from the force of exerted in this type application. The

bearings
would be the leas of my worries. I would worry more about breaking a
trunion.



I'd have to disagree Leon. Unless he's taking the logging road short cut,
he's going to be fine. Look at how many things that are far more fragile
(glass perhaps being one...) that are transported on pickups everyday. I
just don't see any concern for his journey.

--

-Mike-



  #15   Report Post  
Mike Marlow
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Terry Sumner" wrote in message
...
Ummm..Are we forgetting that, before the advent of all these
lightweight saws for contractors like the Bosch and DeWalt,
etc....contractors all over the country used to haul around those
contractor type saws with no problems that I ever heard of. Heck, my
old Delta contractor's saw banged around in my pickup for years with
nothing supporting the motor and it ran just fine.

Terry


Precisely.

--

-Mike-





  #16   Report Post  
Lawrence S Wasserman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
AndyB wrote:
...snipped...
I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

...snipped...
Thanks in advance,
AndyB



You might want to take another look at your saw. On a contractor saw, the
motor often has a connector either at the switch or in-line in the wiring
to the switch. I have a Delta Contractor saw and it has an in-line
connector between the switch and motor. besides, the motor is about the
easiest thing to remove from the saw, even if you did have to disconnect
the wires.
--

SDF Public Access UNIX System -
http://sdf.lonestar.org
  #17   Report Post  
Leon
 
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Default


"Unquestionably Confused" wrote in message
...
Leon wrote:
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

ruck.


Around the block would be OK but a 30 minute commute? You can bet there
will be plenty of opportunities for the vehicle to undulate causing the
motor to bounce around. Typically going through an intersection on a
green light is enough to bounce the motor.
The force you describe on the bearing during normal operation is totally
different from the force of exerted in this type application. The
bearings would be the leas of my worries. I would worry more about
breaking a trunion.


How did your saw arrive at the dealership, etc. from Taiwan? Motor
assembled, hung from trunnion? Blocked? Repeat that and forget about all
the doomsayers.


Every TS that I have seen delivered new has the motor either braced and
bolted to keep it from moving or detached altogether.



  #18   Report Post  
RonB
 
Posts: n/a
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I am about to move to my new house and I need to move my shop (since I
don't want the mover to touch my tools)


I understand your reluctance but consider:

You move your tools and something gets broke, you are holding the bag.

You move the tools and you, a family member or friend gets hurt, you've got
the bag.

A responsible mover with insurance or bond damages something, he pays for
it. Likewise if he a movers employee gets hurt the mover pays the doctor.

I coordinated lots of moves at my previous company the involved personal
equipment, computers, shop equipment and documents. With tons of stuff
moved we had very few problems - most with damaged computer equipment. The
mover picked up the damages immediately. Most reputable movers have to do
this because their reputation and business is at stake. Our last two local
moves were done by experienced apartment movers with zero damage. One of
their guys got bummed up and I felt bad but it had no effect on my wallet or
insurance.

Still.......I share your sentiment.

RonB



  #19   Report Post  
Mike O.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 02 Oct 2005 16:55:40 GMT, "Clint"
wrote:

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.



Get a pair of wire cutters and about 10" from the motor snip that wire
in two. Go to the hardware store and get a male and female end for an
extension cord and attach them to the wire you just cut. It takes
about 10 minutes and costs about $5.00 and solves the problem forever.

We used these saws on the job for years and this was always the first
mod we made to them since we had to move them every two weeks or so.

A few years back, Delta finally started doing this at the factory.
The standard motor now has a short pig tail on it.

Mike O.
  #20   Report Post  
Fred
 
Posts: n/a
Default

AndyB wrote:
I am about to move to my new house and I need
to move my shop (since I don't want the mover to
touch my tools)

Anyway, I need to move my Rockwell (now Delta)
contractor style table saw. I have removed the
table extensions, the fence, the fence rails,
the blade, table insert and splitter.

My question is this. The motor is on a swing
arm and is held up by tension from the drive belt.
Can I leave the motor attached (in it's normal
operating position) for the ride? I will be driving
it about 1/2 hour in a pickup truck.

I don't want to ruin the bearings or otherwise hurt
the various parts, but removing the motor would be
a major nuisance since I would basically have to
re-wire the saw to do it.

Any and all advice would be appreciated.

TO REPLY BY EMAIL REMOVE THE STRING "SPAMNOT"
FROM MY REPLY ADDRESS. Sorry for that hassles,
but spammers make it necessary.

Thanks in advance,
AndyB

Unless your truck has no suspension you'll be fine just load it and
drive it will be fine. I moved a unisaw 1200 mi with no problems.
Fred


  #21   Report Post  
AndyB
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Thanks everyone. I decided to remove the motor
(mostly for weight). I was able to pop the entire
switch off the cabinet and move it with the motor
(no wire cutting).

Thanks for the inputs.

AndyB
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