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Default Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table

As I noted in my WRECK response your best bet is to Google Image search and
then pick the features you want to use in your fence and table. That is
what I did before building this one (previously posted 2-3 years ago).

The table is made from a double layer of 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood. The
outside edge of the extendable table outriggers have a third layer. The
joint where outriggers meet the main table have 45degree support under the
main table to support the outriggers during normal use. They also form a
pretty good friction lock to keep them in place when unextended. The table
is topped with plain old hardboard, with a replacable panel in the center.

The fence is made from maple. Extension rods on both the table and fence
are 3/8" steel rod. Standard T-Slot extrusion and T-Slot hardware finish
table and fence as shown. The auxillary table is held to the metal, factory
table with the same kind of knobs and bolts that extend through the plywood
part of the table.

As I recall, your Ryobi drill press has a crank-handle lift for the table.
That is good because addition of the bigger table will make it heaver -
shouldn't be an issue with the crank. I use a bungee-cable-pulley system to
help lift the table on my old craftsman.

RonB








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Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table-table3-jpg  Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table-table1-jpg  Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table-table2-jpg  
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Default Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table

BTW - Your post mentioned use of MDF for the fence. Don't know why that
wouldn't work. However, if you build a table too, remember that the area
under the quill will get holey and beat up in time. It's a good idea to
make this area replaceable or repairable. That is why I have the lift-out
panel beneath the quill. I have replaced that patch 2 or 3 times so far.
The plywood under the hardboard looks kinda ugly but the top surface is
fine.

RonB

"RonB" wrote in message
...
As I noted in my WRECK response your best bet is to Google Image search
and then pick the features you want to use in your fence and table. That
is what I did before building this one (previously posted 2-3 years ago).

The table is made from a double layer of 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood. The
outside edge of the extendable table outriggers have a third layer. The
joint where outriggers meet the main table have 45degree support under the
main table to support the outriggers during normal use. They also form a
pretty good friction lock to keep them in place when unextended. The
table is topped with plain old hardboard, with a replacable panel in the
center.

The fence is made from maple. Extension rods on both the table and fence
are 3/8" steel rod. Standard T-Slot extrusion and T-Slot hardware finish
table and fence as shown. The auxillary table is held to the metal,
factory table with the same kind of knobs and bolts that extend through
the plywood part of the table.

As I recall, your Ryobi drill press has a crank-handle lift for the table.
That is good because addition of the bigger table will make it heaver -
shouldn't be an issue with the crank. I use a bungee-cable-pulley system
to help lift the table on my old craftsman.

RonB




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Default Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table

Table looks great on that old drill press. Can you get a pic of the
setup you have to raise and lower the table?
Thanks.
On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 22:24:54 -0500, "RonB" wrote:

As I noted in my WRECK response your best bet is to Google Image search and
then pick the features you want to use in your fence and table. That is
what I did before building this one (previously posted 2-3 years ago).

The table is made from a double layer of 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood. The
outside edge of the extendable table outriggers have a third layer. The
joint where outriggers meet the main table have 45degree support under the
main table to support the outriggers during normal use. They also form a
pretty good friction lock to keep them in place when unextended. The table
is topped with plain old hardboard, with a replacable panel in the center.

The fence is made from maple. Extension rods on both the table and fence
are 3/8" steel rod. Standard T-Slot extrusion and T-Slot hardware finish
table and fence as shown. The auxillary table is held to the metal, factory
table with the same kind of knobs and bolts that extend through the plywood
part of the table.

As I recall, your Ryobi drill press has a crank-handle lift for the table.
That is good because addition of the bigger table will make it heaver -
shouldn't be an issue with the crank. I use a bungee-cable-pulley system to
help lift the table on my old craftsman.

RonB


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Default Ping asmurff - Drill Press Table

"bill" wrote in message
...
Table looks great on that old drill press. Can you get a pic of the
setup you have to raise and lower the table?
Thanks.


Here are pics. This jury-rig "helps" to lift the table. All it amounts to
is:

- A 1/8" steel cable attached to an the back of the table (the eye is
screwed into an existing threaded hole);

- The cable routes from the eye in the table, up to an inexpensive pulley
(mounted to an existing bolt in the drill press head);

- And then down to one end of a rubber bungee.

- The lower end of the bungee is attached to the bolt that secures the
drill press up-tube.

The bungee helps lift the table but as it stretches out and has to be
readjusted from time to time. When new, it actually lifted the table when
I loosened the tube clamping hand-bolt and all I had to do was gently push
up or down and reset the hand-bolt.

There are other ways to do this. Google for things like "drill press table
lift". There are a couple of versions that use a crank jack like you would
find on the tongue of a boat or utility trailer. I even saw one that had a
small, reversible motor attached.

There are better ways to do it but mine works as long as the bungee is
adjusted.

RonB






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