Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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  #1   Report Post  
John
 
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Default Woodturning, what kit do I need?

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of tools
and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks


  #2   Report Post  
Roger
 
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John wrote:
Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of tools
and machinery I would need to do this.


You may want to reference the "pointy stick compendium project" thread
currently running over on rec.norm It is filled with "wisdom" on the
making and lore of pointy sticks. :-)

A lathe, a roughing gouge, and a skew would seem to be an easy starting
point. You can probably make it as complicated as you like from there
with everything from fancy laid up blanks to high-tech composite materials.

Roger

  #3   Report Post  
Bill Rubenstein
 
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I believe that you will find that most pool cue makers are using metal
lathes rather than wood lathes.

Bill

Roger wrote:
John wrote:

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools
and machinery I would need to do this.



You may want to reference the "pointy stick compendium project" thread
currently running over on rec.norm It is filled with "wisdom" on the
making and lore of pointy sticks. :-)

A lathe, a roughing gouge, and a skew would seem to be an easy starting
point. You can probably make it as complicated as you like from there
with everything from fancy laid up blanks to high-tech composite materials.

Roger

  #4   Report Post  
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"John" wrote:

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks



If you google, there is a guy makes pool cues and sells the tools to make
them. Try searching on lathe AND 'pool cue'. I've run across it a couple
times.
  #5   Report Post  
John
 
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Default

Hi Bill,

Yes, this is spot on, I need to know what metal lathe is suitable due to the
power aspect, what speed is safe for woodturning using a metal lathe, I need
a metal lathe that can turn slow enough to allow wood to be turned.

Thanks.


"Bill Rubenstein" wrote in message
. com...
I believe that you will find that most pool cue makers are using metal
lathes rather than wood lathes.

Bill

Roger wrote:
John wrote:

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools
and machinery I would need to do this.



You may want to reference the "pointy stick compendium project" thread
currently running over on rec.norm It is filled with "wisdom" on the
making and lore of pointy sticks. :-)

A lathe, a roughing gouge, and a skew would seem to be an easy starting
point. You can probably make it as complicated as you like from there
with everything from fancy laid up blanks to high-tech composite

materials.

Roger





  #6   Report Post  
Roger
 
Posts: n/a
Default

John wrote:
Hi Bill,

Yes, this is spot on, I need to know what metal lathe is suitable due to the
power aspect, what speed is safe for woodturning using a metal lathe, I need
a metal lathe that can turn slow enough to allow wood to be turned.

Thanks.


"Bill Rubenstein" wrote in message
. com...

I believe that you will find that most pool cue makers are using metal
lathes rather than wood lathes.


OK, I'm mysified. Why a metal lathe? Is a pool cue now something other
than the long tapered wooden cylinder of my youth? Seems like one of the
simplest things you could possibly turn on a wood lathe--think stair
balusters with no shoulders, coves, and beads to make things
interesting. Might want a steady rest if you're making the whole length
as one piece.

I don't know much about metal lathes but most of the ones I've seen use
cutters that would leave a relatively awful scraped surface on your
stick that would require an inordinant amount of sanding with a lot of
chance of disturbing the smooth line of the cue. I can imagine that
bumps would be bad news!

Are there different kinds of cutters one can use on a metal lathe to
achieve a clean cut in wood?

Roger
  #7   Report Post  
Arch
 
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Default

Probably pool cue manufacturers do use some sort of CNC, copy or engine
lathe, but I'd think a woodturner wouldn't buy the equipment for modest
production. I have a friend who makes custom croquet mallets, drum
sticks and batons on a old Craftsman tubular bed lathe with carbon
tools...he does very well.

BTW, I'm thinking about buying some cheap flea market golf clubs,
removing the metal shafts and turning some faux 'old wooden shafts with
leather grips' as replacements before the collecting craze is over. Bad
idea or am I too late again?


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

  #9   Report Post  
robo hippy
 
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I had a neighbor who made pool cues. His set up was a slow speed metal
lathe and a router with spiral bit in a jig to match the taper of the
cue. This set up took care of the whipping that occurs on long thin
spindles. I have another friend who turns walking sticks in much the
same manner.
robo hippy



















Lobby Dosser wrote:
"John" wrote:

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type

of
tools and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks



If you google, there is a guy makes pool cues and sells the tools to

make
them. Try searching on lathe AND 'pool cue'. I've run across it a

couple
times.


  #10   Report Post  
Bill Rubenstein
 
Posts: n/a
Default

John:

I think that you need to do some reading. Much of the time metal is
turned at lower speeds than wood -- not the other way around. That is
especially true for those of us who turn metal with HHS cutters. Those
who use carbide cutters on metal run at higher speeds.

You would need very little power so that is not an issue. You do need a
machine with a bed long enough to turn your longest cue for one piece
queues. Or if you want to make 2 piece cues, then the bed can be shorter.

Some years ago there was an article in Fine Woodworking on making 2
piece cues. I'd say that is a good place to start and I suspect that
someone who has an index to FWW can come up with the issue number.

Really, turning the stick itself is not much of a challenge. Doing the
fancy decorating is what separates the men from the boys.

Again, you need to do some research before you buy anything -- just my
opinion.

Bill

John wrote:
Hi Bill,

Yes, this is spot on, I need to know what metal lathe is suitable due to the
power aspect, what speed is safe for woodturning using a metal lathe, I need
a metal lathe that can turn slow enough to allow wood to be turned.

Thanks.


"Bill Rubenstein" wrote in message
. com...

I believe that you will find that most pool cue makers are using metal
lathes rather than wood lathes.

Bill

Roger wrote:

John wrote:


Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools
and machinery I would need to do this.


You may want to reference the "pointy stick compendium project" thread
currently running over on rec.norm It is filled with "wisdom" on the
making and lore of pointy sticks. :-)

A lathe, a roughing gouge, and a skew would seem to be an easy starting
point. You can probably make it as complicated as you like from there
with everything from fancy laid up blanks to high-tech composite


materials.

Roger






  #11   Report Post  
Lobby Dosser
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lobby Dosser wrote:

"John" wrote:

Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks



If you google, there is a guy makes pool cues and sells the tools to
make them. Try searching on lathe AND 'pool cue'. I've run across it a
couple times.


So much oddball info, I did a search myself. Here it is:

http://www.cuesmith.com/index.php?page=home

Click 'CUE LATHES'
  #12   Report Post  
Bill Rubenstein
 
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Here is a preview of the things cue builders have to deal with...

If you take a nice, straight hunk of maple and make it into a cue, it is
most likely that it will warp. Even if it is perfectly kiln dried, it
will still not end up straight. The reason -- as you remove wood you
are relieving stresses in the wood. Cheap cues may be made this way but
the really good ones are not.

Now, how do you get a straight stick? You remove a little wood and put
it away for a while to do whatever it is going to do. Then you do it
again and again and each time you remove a little wood and straighten it
out again. That allows the stresses to work their way out and gives you
the best chance of getting a straight stick.

Also, it is unlikely that you can buy really premium cue maple because
the suppliers save it for the big name makers who can and will pay a
premium for it.

Bill

Lobby Dosser wrote:
Lobby Dosser wrote:


"John" wrote:


Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of
tools and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks



If you google, there is a guy makes pool cues and sells the tools to
make them. Try searching on lathe AND 'pool cue'. I've run across it a
couple times.



So much oddball info, I did a search myself. Here it is:

http://www.cuesmith.com/index.php?page=home

Click 'CUE LATHES'

  #13   Report Post  
John
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Bill,

"Bill Rubenstein" wrote in message
. com...
John:

I think that you need to do some reading. Much of the time metal is
turned at lower speeds than wood -- not the other way around. That is
especially true for those of us who turn metal with HHS cutters. Those
who use carbide cutters on metal run at higher speeds.


I did not know that metal was turned at slower speeds, I used to do
metalwork at a school, then a bit of woodturning at college and for some
reason always thought that the metal lathe turned a lot faster than the wood
lathe, so much for the education system
As you can tell my knowlege on lathes is non existant, what books do you
recommend?



You would need very little power so that is not an issue. You do need a
machine with a bed long enough to turn your longest cue for one piece
queues. Or if you want to make 2 piece cues, then the bed can be shorter.


Yes, ideally the lathe should be capable of handling at least 5' lengths,
60", 150 cm, 1500 mm for the metric fans, this is the reason that metal
lathes are used by cue makers, on the metal lathe you can feed the wood
through the head, I am thinking that maybe I should be a little less
ambitious and go for the 2 piece option to see how I get on but then again
the drawbacks I can see here are getting the grain to match when using ash
and lining the cue up straight with a joint in the middle, this may prove
very difficult so I am back to the metal lathe idea again, I think keeping
the cue in one piece will make the job much easier.


Some years ago there was an article in Fine Woodworking on making 2
piece cues. I'd say that is a good place to start and I suspect that
someone who has an index to FWW can come up with the issue number.


I would not mind seeing that if someone has the issue number.


Really, turning the stick itself is not much of a challenge. Doing the
fancy decorating is what separates the men from the boys.


True, I would be more than happy with a plain cue to get me started



Again, you need to do some research before you buy anything -- just my
opinion.


I have been to one woodturning tool supplies shop, not much help, I have
emailed a couple of larger suppliers and am waiting for replies

Thanks all for the help so far..


  #14   Report Post  
Ken Grunke
 
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Default

Bill Rubenstein wrote:
John:

I think that you need to do some reading. Much of the time metal is
turned at lower speeds than wood -- not the other way around. That is
especially true for those of us who turn metal with HHS cutters. Those
who use carbide cutters on metal run at higher speeds.

You would need very little power so that is not an issue. You do need a
machine with a bed long enough to turn your longest cue for one piece
queues. Or if you want to make 2 piece cues, then the bed can be shorter.

Some years ago there was an article in Fine Woodworking on making 2
piece cues. I'd say that is a good place to start and I suspect that
someone who has an index to FWW can come up with the issue number.


That would be July/August 1986, No. 59.

The author ("Colorado Slim") finish turns a cue with a skew at 2000 rpm,
on a wood lathe.

It takes (or took, as the case may be) him several weeks to finish a
cue, turning it a little in stages then letting it stabilize to avoid
warping in the final product.

Ken Grunke

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  #15   Report Post  
Eddie
 
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Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of

tools
and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks





Here's a good link to get you started.


http://www.cuemaker.com/book_on_cue_building.htm


Best of luck.
Eddie




  #16   Report Post  
John
 
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Thank you Eddie, brilliant link just an update to let you all know how
far I have got so far since my first post on the subject.

I phoned my old cue maker to see if he was still making cues, he is but is
not making as many as he used to, he told me some 8 years ago that he was
retiring but he is still going, we had a chat anyway and he offered to sell
me his kit, this time he is definitely retiring, he has had to give up
driving so he cant get about these days, shame really, so it looks like he
will retire for good soon, where have I heard that before LOL, anyway he
said he will give me a call within the next couple of months, he better, if
not I will be on his doorstep to find out why.

I assume he will give me the info I need on how to make the cues, naturally
I will want to know how to use the kit before I buy it, when I used to visit
him years ago I was always looking for clues to see how the cues were made,
I assume he wont mind me being nosey on this occasion, for a change

My goal is to be turning cues before the end of the year.

Cheers all.

"Eddie" wrote in message
k.net...


Hi,

I would like to start making pool cues and was wondering what type of

tools
and machinery I would need to do this.

Thanks





Here's a good link to get you started.


http://www.cuemaker.com/book_on_cue_building.htm


Best of luck.
Eddie




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