Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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Old September 12th 04, 02:13 PM
Alan Van Art
 
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Default Craftsman Turning Tools

Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I
realize they aren't exactly Sorby tools, but I won't be afraid to experiment
with different profiles with them. They came in a blue box with metal hook
closures in the front. The top of the box has a metal badge with the
Craftsman name, and 'Guaranteed Highest Quality'. Inside, the box has
dividers between the tools. The tools have nothing marked on the steel. The
handles are very red in color, pretty obviously not the natural color of the
wood, but stained or dyed or tinted. There is a small decal on each handle
with the Craftsman name and aforementioned catch phrase. There are 8 tools
in all. As far as weight, they are lighter than my Crown tools, but heavier
than the cheesey Jet tools that came with the lathe. Looks like only two of
the tools have been used, but the box has seen better days (on the outside
at least).


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Old September 12th 04, 02:48 PM
Ray Sandusky
 
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Alan

Owning a set of Craftsman turning tools is a rite of passage for most
turners! Have no fear, these tools are pretty good and can be used without
doubt of their ability to do the job. They are HSS and will hold an edge
quite well.

The best tool in the bunch will be the Diamond parting tool - it has a good
configuration for making the parting cuts with clearance - although it will
prove to be a bit short at times.

My experience is that these tools are quite versitile. I have reground
almost every one - the skew was turned into a 45 degree scraper for shear
scraping the outside of a form. The narrow skew (1/2 inch) was reground
with a very long point for making cuts into deep V's and the round nose
scraper was reground to have a long bevel along the left edge to scrape the
inside of boxes.

The small (narrow) spindle gouge is basically worthless, unless you cut down
the length (to reduce chatter) and regrind the edge for making grooves.

So, these tools are great as special application tools - they are cheap and
there is little money lost if the tool is ground down to a nub in a few
months! Plus they are a good set of tools to use to learn how to sharpen at
the grinder!

Use them!

Ray Sandusky






"Alan Van Art" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I
realize they aren't exactly Sorby tools, but I won't be afraid to
experiment with different profiles with them. They came in a blue box with
metal hook closures in the front. The top of the box has a metal badge
with the Craftsman name, and 'Guaranteed Highest Quality'. Inside, the box
has dividers between the tools. The tools have nothing marked on the
steel. The handles are very red in color, pretty obviously not the natural
color of the wood, but stained or dyed or tinted. There is a small decal
on each handle with the Craftsman name and aforementioned catch phrase.
There are 8 tools in all. As far as weight, they are lighter than my Crown
tools, but heavier than the cheesey Jet tools that came with the lathe.
Looks like only two of the tools have been used, but the box has seen
better days (on the outside at least).


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 9/10/2004



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Old September 12th 04, 03:24 PM
Leif Thorvaldson
 
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Default

HSS? Mine were/are carbon steel.

Leif
"Ray Sandusky" wrote in message
...
Alan

Owning a set of Craftsman turning tools is a rite of passage for most
turners! Have no fear, these tools are pretty good and can be used
without doubt of their ability to do the job. They are HSS and will hold
an edge quite well.

The best tool in the bunch will be the Diamond parting tool - it has a
good configuration for making the parting cuts with clearance - although
it will prove to be a bit short at times.

My experience is that these tools are quite versitile. I have reground
almost every one - the skew was turned into a 45 degree scraper for shear
scraping the outside of a form. The narrow skew (1/2 inch) was reground
with a very long point for making cuts into deep V's and the round nose
scraper was reground to have a long bevel along the left edge to scrape
the inside of boxes.

The small (narrow) spindle gouge is basically worthless, unless you cut
down the length (to reduce chatter) and regrind the edge for making
grooves.

So, these tools are great as special application tools - they are cheap
and there is little money lost if the tool is ground down to a nub in a
few months! Plus they are a good set of tools to use to learn how to
sharpen at the grinder!

Use them!

Ray Sandusky






"Alan Van Art" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I
realize they aren't exactly Sorby tools, but I won't be afraid to
experiment with different profiles with them. They came in a blue box
with metal hook closures in the front. The top of the box has a metal
badge with the Craftsman name, and 'Guaranteed Highest Quality'. Inside,
the box has dividers between the tools. The tools have nothing marked on
the steel. The handles are very red in color, pretty obviously not the
natural color of the wood, but stained or dyed or tinted. There is a
small decal on each handle with the Craftsman name and aforementioned
catch phrase. There are 8 tools in all. As far as weight, they are
lighter than my Crown tools, but heavier than the cheesey Jet tools that
came with the lathe. Looks like only two of the tools have been used, but
the box has seen better days (on the outside at least).


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 9/10/2004





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Old September 12th 04, 05:54 PM
Ken Vaughn
 
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"Leif Thorvaldson" wrote in message
...
HSS? Mine were/are carbon steel.

Leif


I have seen both carbon steel and HSS -- these are pretty common items at
flea markets, antique stores, etc. I bought a set new many years ago, it
was stamped "High Speed Steel" under the Craftsman tm on the handle. I
found a set at a flea market which had a black coating on the chisels, but
the handle has the HSS marking also. The handles are the same shape on the
carbon steel sets.

Like Ray, I have reground many of mine for special applications. I made a
spear point scraper, similar to the Richard Raffan spear point, and I use it
a lot. I don't turn the edge on this scraper, but hone it frequently.


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Old September 12th 04, 11:58 PM
Barry N. Turner
 
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think the high speed steel is the later version of these tools. They were
originally in carbon steel. As I recall, all of the tools were quite short,
but usable. I have an old set of Buck Bros. tools that are almost
identical, but are slightly longer. They too, are carbon steel. The Bucks
hold an edge quite well. I can't say about the Craftsman tools, but I
expect they would need to be sharpened fairly often.

Barry


"Alan Van Art" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I
realize they aren't exactly Sorby tools, but I won't be afraid to

experiment
with different profiles with them. They came in a blue box with metal hook
closures in the front. The top of the box has a metal badge with the
Craftsman name, and 'Guaranteed Highest Quality'. Inside, the box has
dividers between the tools. The tools have nothing marked on the steel.

The
handles are very red in color, pretty obviously not the natural color of

the
wood, but stained or dyed or tinted. There is a small decal on each handle
with the Craftsman name and aforementioned catch phrase. There are 8 tools
in all. As far as weight, they are lighter than my Crown tools, but

heavier
than the cheesey Jet tools that came with the lathe. Looks like only two

of
the tools have been used, but the box has seen better days (on the outside
at least).


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 9/10/2004






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Old September 13th 04, 03:52 AM
Leif Thorvaldson
 
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Default

I bought my Sears Craftsman Lathe around 1990 and it came with the carbon
steel tools -- short bladed and medium handles. I turn to them frequently
when I am turning and have reshaped the edges on a couple of them. As to
having to sharpen them more frequently, I have learned that all I have to do
is press harder! *G*

Leif
"Barry N. Turner" wrote in message
. ..
think the high speed steel is the later version of these tools. They were
originally in carbon steel. As I recall, all of the tools were quite
short,
but usable. I have an old set of Buck Bros. tools that are almost
identical, but are slightly longer. They too, are carbon steel. The
Bucks
hold an edge quite well. I can't say about the Craftsman tools, but I
expect they would need to be sharpened fairly often.

Barry


"Alan Van Art" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I
realize they aren't exactly Sorby tools, but I won't be afraid to

experiment
with different profiles with them. They came in a blue box with metal
hook
closures in the front. The top of the box has a metal badge with the
Craftsman name, and 'Guaranteed Highest Quality'. Inside, the box has
dividers between the tools. The tools have nothing marked on the steel.

The
handles are very red in color, pretty obviously not the natural color of

the
wood, but stained or dyed or tinted. There is a small decal on each
handle
with the Craftsman name and aforementioned catch phrase. There are 8
tools
in all. As far as weight, they are lighter than my Crown tools, but

heavier
than the cheesey Jet tools that came with the lathe. Looks like only two

of
the tools have been used, but the box has seen better days (on the
outside
at least).


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 9/10/2004






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Old September 17th 04, 05:49 AM
Bertie Pittman
 
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On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 13:13:36 GMT, in rec.crafts.woodturning you wrote:
Went to a flea-mkt and picked up a set of old Craftsman Turning tools
cheaply. I was wondering if anybody knew anything about these tools, I


Hi Alan,

It sounds like you have found a nice set of older tools.

A few years ago, on the advice of people in this newgroup I picked up
a used set of Craftsman HSS tools. The price was right and I've been
very pleased with them. They stay sharp and work well but are shorter
than other tools, which presents some challenges at times. I
especilly like the width and shape of the stock the gouges are made
from.

Like others here have said, I don't hesitate to rework them into
other useful shapes or specialty tools. I made a 1/4 wide parting
tool from one that I use on many projects to turn a tenon the width of
the tool in one pass that will fit in my chuck. It also functions as a
skew and is great for rolling small beads also.

I've seen some of the older Craftsman tools that were longer and I
wouldn't hesitate to buy and use an older set of carbon steel tools
either if they were priced reasonably. I have some older high carbon
steel tools by another company that I use and prefer in some
situations. Most of the older tools were of excellent quality and
construction.. much better than the run of the mill tools made today,
IMO.

You can tell if they are carbon steel or HSS when you grind them.
Carbon steel produces lots of bright sparks that break up when they
hit something hard, like the tool rest. They look kinda kinda like a
celebration sparkler the kids like to play with. HSS give off far
less sparks and and are sometimes hard to see. They are an orange
colored ball like spark that doesn't break up when it hits a surface.

Bertie



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Old September 19th 04, 09:11 PM
James E Gaydos
 
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If any of you have the old Dell Stubbs video.
Take a re-look at it, Dell was using a few Craftsman tools in
the video.
I've had a few of these over the years, the price is right
and the quality of the HSS is very good, not polished up like
some others, but good just the same. I like to make scrapers from
them.
Joaz Hill,( I think he's from Main) took a Craftsman gouge and ground
a bevel on the bottom and used it as a scraper for the insides of a
bowl. I tried this
and it works very well. If you go to his site I think he still has a
description of it. BTW Sears still sells these tools, last time I
priced
them, about $14.99 each. Jim
  #9   Report Post  
Old September 20th 04, 03:10 AM
Leif Thorvaldson
 
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"James E Gaydos" wrote in message
om...
If any of you have the old Dell Stubbs video.
Take a re-look at it, Dell was using a few Craftsman tools in
the video.
I've had a few of these over the years, the price is right
and the quality of the HSS is very good, not polished up like
some others, but good just the same. I like to make scrapers from
them.
Joaz Hill,( I think he's from Main) took a Craftsman gouge and ground
a bevel on the bottom and used it as a scraper for the insides of a
bowl. I tried this
and it works very well. If you go to his site I think he still has a
description of it. BTW Sears still sells these tools, last time I
priced
them, about $14.99 each. Jim



=== Don't your gouges have bevels on the bottom? Mine do!

Leif






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Old September 24th 04, 12:06 AM
James E Gaydos
 
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Thanks Leif. The bevel is on the inside of the bottom.
Jim


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