Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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Default blount vega oliver and more

this old blount looks to have seen better days but it is probably built
like a tank and if the motor is good could be placed back into service
with out spending a lot

https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lg...487969403.html

could probably turn outboard too


the price seems high but it is in very good shape

https://fresno.craigslist.org/tls/d/...440850653.html



not a bad deal compared with what 600 will get you for a new lathe

https://sacramento.craigslist.org/tl...488944396.html


a massive oliver this might be the same one seen before

https://sacramento.craigslist.org/tl...476274785.html


interesting vintage vega

https://reno.craigslist.org/tls/d/ve...464537055.html

not bad since it can turn outboard as well


even though it is a jet it would make a great starter setup since it also
includes a woodcraft waterstone sharpener


https://klamath.craigslist.org/tls/d...483844412.html


a unrealistic price for an oddball

https://fresno.craigslist.org/tls/d/...470726239.html



this could be saved for april fools day

https://klamath.craigslist.org/tls/d...483844412.html












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On 2018-02-08 12:19 PM, Electric Comet wrote:


not a bad deal compared with what 600 will get you for a new lathe

https://sacramento.craigslist.org/tl...488944396.html

General was a great company making superb woodworking machinery at their
foundry in Drummondville, Quebec. The only N.American competitor on
quality in those days was Powermatic - Delta was almost as good.
Now General is no more and the Powermatic foundry has also closed (AIUI).
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On Friday, February 9, 2018 at 10:24:50 AM UTC-6, graham wrote:
On 2018-02-08 12:19 PM, Electric Comet wrote:


not a bad deal compared with what 600 will get you for a new lathe

https://sacramento.craigslist.org/tl...488944396.html

General was a great company making superb woodworking machinery at their
foundry in Drummondville, Quebec. The only N.American competitor on
quality in those days was Powermatic - Delta was almost as good.
Now General is no more and the Powermatic foundry has also closed (AIUI).


Its been 20 to 30 years since the North American companies made American/Canadian tools. Think Powermatic was the first to go to Taiwan and/or China. Followed fairly quickly by Delta. Early to late 1990s when this happened.. General, not sure what happened to them. They were always tiny compared to the other two. Not sure if ownership changed 30 years ago and the new owner immediately closed all Canadian built machines and moved everything instantly to China. Or maybe General stayed with its old owners and they saw the writing on the walls and followed Delta and Powermatic to China or Taiwan. But for all of them, its been 20-30 years since any of them made North American machines. Its all Chinese now.
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On Fri, 9 Feb 2018 09:24:46 -0700
graham wrote:

General was a great company making superb woodworking machinery at
their foundry in Drummondville, Quebec. The only N.American
competitor on quality in those days was Powermatic - Delta was almost
as good. Now General is no more and the Powermatic foundry has also
closed (AIUI).


i recall your previous comments about general here

did not look closely at this one but from what you are seeing this is
a real good buy









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On Friday, February 9, 2018 at 4:47:16 PM UTC-6, Electric Comet wrote:
On Fri, 9 Feb 2018 09:24:46 -0700
graham wrote:

General was a great company making superb woodworking machinery at
their foundry in Drummondville, Quebec. The only N.American
competitor on quality in those days was Powermatic - Delta was almost
as good. Now General is no more and the Powermatic foundry has also
closed (AIUI).


i recall your previous comments about general here

did not look closely at this one but from what you are seeing this is
a real good buy


The General 160 lathe for $600 is probably a great buy. Value wise. BUT, its still a 12" swing lathe. Is 36" between centers. Pulley speed changes.. Maybe Reeves drive to get variable speed. Not sure. You can get the exact same specs today by buying a new mini lathe and an extension. For less than $600. Maybe even get variable speed on the mini lathe. The General is a good lathe. But technology has changed a bit in the last 30 years. I would love to have this General. But you can get the same capabilities for less today. The $600 is probably based on the fact the lathe cost $1500+ brand new 30 years ago. The seller thinks its still worth 40% of retail back then. Probably true. But retail prices of lathes has come down since then. Maybe quality too compared to this fine Canadian General.


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On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 06:46:37 -0700
graham wrote:

advert. Apparently General used to age all the castings to allow
stress relief before machining them. The quality of their table saws
was legendary. I saw some ex-school shop ones in a local store


i saw on some vendor site future metal lathe parts
they season them outdoors for months and years before they finish
them and make them into lathes or mills etc

i doubt the stuff made in china is seasoned before they finish them








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On 2018-02-10 11:28 AM, Electric Comet wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 06:46:37 -0700
graham wrote:

advert. Apparently General used to age all the castings to allow
stress relief before machining them. The quality of their table saws
was legendary. I saw some ex-school shop ones in a local store


i saw on some vendor site future metal lathe parts
they season them outdoors for months and years before they finish
them and make them into lathes or mills etc

i doubt the stuff made in china is seasoned before they finish them

They most probably re-heat the cast iron to relieve the stress in higher
quality tools.
In the early days of Taiwanese imports, it paid to take a straight edge
with you when buying, say, a table saw to check the flatness of the table.
These days the quality is much higher.

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On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 7:46:40 AM UTC-6, graham wrote:
On 2018-02-09 11:34 PM, wrote:
On Friday, February 9, 2018 at 4:47:16 PM UTC-6, Electric Comet wrote:
On Fri, 9 Feb 2018 09:24:46 -0700
graham wrote:

General was a great company making superb woodworking machinery at
their foundry in Drummondville, Quebec. The only N.American
competitor on quality in those days was Powermatic - Delta was almost
as good. Now General is no more and the Powermatic foundry has also
closed (AIUI).

i recall your previous comments about general here

did not look closely at this one but from what you are seeing this is
a real good buy


The General 160 lathe for $600 is probably a great buy. Value wise. BUT, its still a 12" swing lathe. Is 36" between centers. Pulley speed changes. Maybe Reeves drive to get variable speed. Not sure.


No, it's a 4-speed. If it had the Reeves drive, there would be a lever
on the front of the cabinet.
I'm faced with a similar problem regarding pricing. I have a 160 for
sale.



I hear you. Your problem is even though your 160 is undoubtedly a fine lathe, it really just isn't worth a whole lot today when compared to what you can buy brand new. For what you want for the 160, its possible to buy a brand new Chinese lathe with an extension bed and maybe variable speed and be able to do 120% of what the 160 can do. Think of cars. A fancy luxury car from the 1970s is the same or maybe worse than a medium Camry, Accord etc.. today. Camry and Accord are not luxury cars, but they probably have better, more powerful motors and nicer interiors today than what the 1970s luxury cars had. Would you buy a 1972 Coupe de Ville for the same price you can buy a new Camry? Most likely not. Unless you really want the pimp image..





It is just the cast iron top on a custom base. I bought it that
way and built the base as I'm too tall for the cabinet-type in this advert.

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On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 4:50:11 PM UTC-6, graham wrote:
On 2018-02-10 3:35 PM, wrote:
On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 7:46:40 AM UTC-6, graham wrote:


The General 160 lathe for $600 is probably a great buy. Value wise. BUT, its still a 12" swing lathe. Is 36" between centers. Pulley speed changes. Maybe Reeves drive to get variable speed. Not sure.

No, it's a 4-speed. If it had the Reeves drive, there would be a lever
on the front of the cabinet.
I'm faced with a similar problem regarding pricing. I have a 160 for
sale.



I hear you. Your problem is even though your 160 is undoubtedly a fine lathe, it really just isn't worth a whole lot today when compared to what you can buy brand new. For what you want for the 160, its possible to buy a brand new Chinese lathe with an extension bed and maybe variable speed and be able to do 120% of what the 160 can do.


I agree! My new lathe is a Nova Galaxi and although much more expensive
than the 160, is far more versatile.
However, I know some top-class turners still using the 260, which is a
bigger version of the 160 and used to grace the workshops of
internationally known turners until the likes of Oneway and Robust came
along.
Graham


The General 160 and 260 lathes are fine, fine lathes. Just like the now non existent Powermatic 90 and Delta made one similar too. 3 HP with variable speed I think. Or maybe it was pulleys, not sure. All fine 12" or 24" diameter lathes with 36" between centers. Pretty much identical to Oneway lathes today except Oneway is welded steel and not cast iron. All fine and good. But lathes have improved over the years. Sliding head stocks are far superior to the old time fixed head lathes. You get a short and long bed lathe in one. And you do not have to bend your body in half over the bed to hollow out a bowl. Pain.
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On 2018-02-10 10:12 PM, wrote:
On Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 4:50:11 PM UTC-6, graham wrote:



I agree! My new lathe is a Nova Galaxi and although much more expensive
than the 160, is far more versatile.
However, I know some top-class turners still using the 260, which is a
bigger version of the 160 and used to grace the workshops of
internationally known turners until the likes of Oneway and Robust came
along.
Graham


The General 160 and 260 lathes are fine, fine lathes. Just like the now non existent Powermatic 90 and Delta made one similar too. 3 HP with variable speed I think. Or maybe it was pulleys, not sure. All fine 12" or 24" diameter lathes with 36" between centers. Pretty much identical to Oneway lathes today except Oneway is welded steel and not cast iron. All fine and good. But lathes have improved over the years. Sliding head stocks are far superior to the old time fixed head lathes. You get a short and long bed lathe in one. And you do not have to bend your body in half over the bed to hollow out a bowl. Pain.

Although my Nova Galaxi has a sliding and swivelling headstock, I still
adopt the old "fixed headstock" position from force of habit:-)
I now have a Hope System hollower with both laser and TV attachments and
for deep hollow turning, a speciality of mine, the headstock has to be
in the "fixed" position.
https://hopewoodturning.co.uk/jig-s/...ra-system?c=17

Graham
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On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 12:55:52 -0700
graham wrote:

the table. These days the quality is much higher.


they do iterate and listen to the customer and over time they end up
making quality but it has taken them a while to learn

they are still learning but they go through iterations more quickly
now with cad designs and automation








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On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 15:50:09 -0700
graham wrote:

I agree! My new lathe is a Nova Galaxi and although much more
expensive than the 160, is far more versatile.
However, I know some top-class turners still using the 260, which is
a bigger version of the 160 and used to grace the workshops of
internationally known turners until the likes of Oneway and Robust
came along.


well having one too many lathes is not the worst problem to have

maybe you can donate it to a local maker space

some schools still have woodshops too and believe it or not they may be
happy to have it







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On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 14:35:58 -0800 (PST)
" wrote:

can do. Think of cars. A fancy luxury car from the 1970s is the
same or maybe worse than a medium Camry, Accord etc. today. Camry
and Accord are not luxury cars, but they probably have better, more
powerful motors and nicer interiors today than what the 1970s luxury
cars had. Would you buy a 1972 Coupe de Ville for the same price you
can buy a new Camry? Most likely not. Unless you really want the


i get it and not disagreeing with your point

one thing about using a vintage car as a daily driver is that safety
was not as well baked in to cars then as it is now

crumple zones come to mind first

but the air bags and abs etc

lathes are as safe as the operator











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On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 4:18:01 PM UTC-6, Electric Comet wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 14:35:58 -0800 (PST)
" wrote:

can do. Think of cars. A fancy luxury car from the 1970s is the
same or maybe worse than a medium Camry, Accord etc. today. Camry
and Accord are not luxury cars, but they probably have better, more
powerful motors and nicer interiors today than what the 1970s luxury
cars had. Would you buy a 1972 Coupe de Ville for the same price you
can buy a new Camry? Most likely not. Unless you really want the


i get it and not disagreeing with your point

one thing about using a vintage car as a daily driver is that safety
was not as well baked in to cars then as it is now

crumple zones come to mind first

but the air bags and abs etc

lathes are as safe as the operator


I wasn't even thinking about the safety differences between the Eldorado and the Camry, Accord. Just the quality aspects. You're right the safety aspect is there. Even though the Eldorado probably weighed one ton more, it probably fared much worse in any safety test crashes.
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