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Old February 11th 14, 11:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default Bandsaw speed

I have a Griz 14" bandsaw with riser. Nearly all I do is cut out bowl
blanks from green, wet wood, average thickness 5-6 inches. I use
Timber Wolf 3/8" blades 3 tpi. Now for the question. I have always
run it on the low blade speed. Has anyone used the high speed for
such work? It is wired for 220 and never really bogs down on the low
speed but was wondering there is any advantage of a faster blade speed.
--
 GW Ross 

 Keep your feet close to the ground. 







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Old February 12th 14, 04:45 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default Bandsaw speed

"G. Ross" wrote:
I have a Griz 14" bandsaw with riser. Nearly all I do is cut out bowl
blanks from green, wet wood, average thickness 5-6 inches. I use Timber
Wolf 3/8" blades 3 tpi. Now for the question. I have always run it on
the low blade speed. Has anyone used the high speed for such work? It
is wired for 220 and never really bogs down on the low speed but was
wondering there is any advantage of a faster blade speed.


A faster blade speed will cut more smoothly and faster if the saw does not
bog down. Neither may offer any advantage for your purpose.
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Old February 12th 14, 06:02 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default Bandsaw speed

On Tue, 11 Feb 2014 17:10:03 -0600, G. Ross wrote
(in message ) :

I have a Griz 14" bandsaw with riser. Nearly all I do is cut out bowl
blanks from green, wet wood, average thickness 5-6 inches. I use
Timber Wolf 3/8" blades 3 tpi. Now for the question. I have always
run it on the low blade speed. Has anyone used the high speed for
such work? It is wired for 220 and never really bogs down on the low
speed but was wondering there is any advantage of a faster blade speed.


Blade speed is a careful dance with blade tension, and feed rate. Part of
blade speed is the mechanical factors in your saw, the bearings for the
wheels, and the tires on the wheels, and the tension keeping the blade
straight. Part of the blade tension is again, mechanical factors in your saw
- notably the bearings - and then there is the weld in the blade and when it
will let go - plus the continual flexing of the blade and the shape of the
notch at the bottom of each tooth and the likelihood of a work-hardening
failure at any tooth notch. Faster blades will also heat up faster and
hotter, accelerating the work hardening thing.
In general, the saw manufacturer has probably considered some of these issues
in establishing the blade speed for the given saw. You can go slower,
depending on the nature of the item being cut, but faster is not always
better.
Blade tension is another variable, which you may have control over, and
Timber Wolf may have a nice tutorial on that issue in its sales literature.
tom koehler


--
I will find a way or make one.

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Old February 12th 14, 11:29 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default Bandsaw speed


"G. Ross" wrote in message
...
I have a Griz 14" bandsaw with riser. Nearly all I do is cut out bowl
blanks from green, wet wood, average thickness 5-6 inches. I use Timber
Wolf 3/8" blades 3 tpi. Now for the question. I have always run it on the
low blade speed. Has anyone used the high speed for such work? It is
wired for 220 and never really bogs down on the low speed but was wondering
there is any advantage of a faster blade speed.


I think the old saw :-) that "if it feels right, it probably is" applies
here. If you've been getting good results on low speed, I'd stick with it.
You're not going to overheat the blade, and it sounds like you haven't got a
supervisor leaning over your shoulder going "Haven't you finished yet?", so
you can afford the time.

Steve




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Old February 13th 14, 12:08 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default Bandsaw speed

tom koehler wrote:
On Tue, 11 Feb 2014 17:10:03 -0600, G. Ross wrote
(in [email protected] com):

I have a Griz 14" bandsaw with riser. Nearly all I do is cut out bowl
blanks from green, wet wood, average thickness 5-6 inches. I use
Timber Wolf 3/8" blades 3 tpi. Now for the question. I have always
run it on the low blade speed. Has anyone used the high speed for
such work? It is wired for 220 and never really bogs down on the low
speed but was wondering there is any advantage of a faster blade speed.


Blade speed is a careful dance with blade tension, and feed rate. Part of
blade speed is the mechanical factors in your saw, the bearings for the
wheels, and the tires on the wheels, and the tension keeping the blade
straight. Part of the blade tension is again, mechanical factors in your saw
- notably the bearings - and then there is the weld in the blade and when it
will let go - plus the continual flexing of the blade and the shape of the
notch at the bottom of each tooth and the likelihood of a work-hardening
failure at any tooth notch. Faster blades will also heat up faster and
hotter, accelerating the work hardening thing.
In general, the saw manufacturer has probably considered some of these issues
in establishing the blade speed for the given saw. You can go slower,
depending on the nature of the item being cut, but faster is not always
better.
Blade tension is another variable, which you may have control over, and
Timber Wolf may have a nice tutorial on that issue in its sales literature.
tom koehler


Good to hear from you, Tom. These blanks are sopping wet so heat is
probably not a problem, but I think I will stay with low speed.

--
 GW Ross 

 Keep your feet close to the ground. 








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