Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...e_system?Args=

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?

Thanks,

Steve


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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

StephenM wrote:
Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...e_system?Args=

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?

Thanks,

Steve


1. Was it
http://www.vinceswoodnwonders.com/pu...0abrasives.htm
He is a nice guy and the discs are ok but the ones I got were not
color coded and did not have the grit number on the back so was easy
to mix them up. After shopping around for a few years I have settled
on Klingspor disks.

2. Yes

3. No

4. Yes. Keep an air gun nearby, stop sanding frequently and cool
the disk with the compressed air. Sand at 200 rpm or the nearest
you can get. I have a supply of industrial hook and loop strips. If I
burn the hooks off I just sand them off on my big disk sander and glue
on another layer. But I am always working on the interface pad, not
the original H&L on the disk mandrel.

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA

The dentist said my wisdom teeth were
retarded.




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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

StephenM wrote:
Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...e_system?Args=

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?


Probably - get a can of paste wax (I'm using Minwax currently) and wipe
it onto the bowl w/a paper towel before sanding w/your coarsest grit.
It softens the wood slightly, allowing you to quickly deal w/the tearout
in short order. With the wax on there, sanding is much cooler. All the
wax will be sanded off before you get to the finishing stage.

Having one of the crepe rubber sandpaper cleaners is handy for cleaning
up the sandpaper a bit. Usually one can flick the wax/sawdust mix off
pretty well though.

HTH...

....Kevin
--
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb
In a recent poll, seven out of ten hard drives prefered Linux.
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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

1. Was it
http://www.vinceswoodnwonders.com/pu...0abrasives.htm



Thanks, That's the one... I've sent him an order.

-Steve


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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad


Probably - get a can of paste wax (I'm using Minwax currently) and wipe it
onto the bowl w/a paper towel before sanding w/your coarsest grit. It
softens the wood slightly, allowing you to quickly deal w/the tearout in
short order. With the wax on there, sanding is much cooler. All the wax
will be sanded off before you get to the finishing stage.


Thanks, I'll have to try that.

-Steve




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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

StephenM wrote:
Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...e_system?Args=

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?

Thanks,

Steve


1. Was it
http://www.vinceswoodnwonders.com/pu...0abrasives.htm
He is a nice guy and the discs are ok but the ones I got were not
color coded and did not have the grit number on the back so was easy
to mix them up. After shopping around for a few years I have settled
on Klingspor disks.

2. Yes

3. No

4. Yes. Keep an air gun nearby, stop sanding frequently and cool
the disk with the compressed air. Sand at 200 rpm or the nearest
you can get. I have a supply of industrial hook and loop strips. If I
burn the hooks off I just sand them off on my big disk sander and glue
on another layer. But I am always working on the interface pad, not
the original H&L on the disk mandrel.

Thought I sent this earlier, but it never showed up.

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA

Insert inevitable trivial witticism of
your choice.




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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

The discs from Vince outlast anything I have used about 2 to 1.

If you are having problems with frying the hooks, then you are sanding
at too high of a speed, and using too much pressure. Are you using a
power sanding system, like a drill? I have a piece of 1/4 inch cork
under my trigger to keep the speed down. Sanding with the drill and
lathe at slower speeds does a much better job, and doesn't take any
more time. It also reduces the heat factor which can cause cracks in
the wood as well as delaminating the loop backing on the discs, and
melting the hooks, and I found this all out by experience before any
one told me about it.

I do use the interface pads as they are cheaper than buying a new
mandril. I keep my discs in pigeon holes to keep them organized. Most
abrasive companies will have numbers on most of the discs. I used to
cut my own, and had my daughter write the grit numbers on the discs
for 1 penny per disc. She loved it. I do keep the rubber eraser sticks
handy, and use them frequently.

As far as the tearout goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of
cure. Of course, keep your tools sharp. Dry wood will tear out more
than wet wood. Some woods will tear more than others. If you are
getting tear out, especially on dry wood, wet the wood with water or
finish oil, let it soak in for 60 seconds or so, and then make very
light cuts with a freshly sharpened tool to turn off all the wet
stuff. This can take a couple of applications to get rid of most of
the tearout. Finish cuts also make a difference. A finish cut is VERY
LIGHT where you get only whispy shavings. They are done at a shear
angle of 45 degrees or more. On the outside, a gouge with the handle
low, and using the wings of the gouge works fine. This is usually a
pulling cut (pulling the gouge towards you), and is not a stock
removal cut. It is used to smooth out any uneveness on the surface,
and will take several passes to touch up things. A scraper also works
well here, on a 45 degree angle, not held flat. It is more difficult
on the inside of the bowl. Here, I prefer a scraper (I am a bit
unusual in this preference), again at a 45 degree angle, and a gentle
pull cut (almost impossible to do as a push cut). Be careful near the
rim, as it will vibrate, and you may need to do it in steps as you
finish turn: turn down to finish thickness about 1 to 2 inches, finish
shear cut, then go down another 1 to 2 inches, finish shear cut, etc
till you get to the bottom. You will get better with practice.

robo hippy



On Mar 5, 7:57*am, Gerald Ross wrote:
StephenM wrote:
Like this:


http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...k_and_Loop___Q...


I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.


Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?


I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:


1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?


2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?


3. Is PSA *better bet?


4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?


Thanks,


Steve


1. Was ithttp://www.vinceswoodnwonders.com/purchase%20abrasives.htm
* * * *He is a nice guy and the discs are ok but the ones I got were not
color coded and did not have the grit number on the back so was easy
to mix them up. *After shopping around for a few years I have settled
on Klingspor disks.

2. Yes

3. No

4. Yes. *Keep an air gun nearby, stop sanding frequently and cool
the disk with the compressed air. Sand at 200 rpm or the nearest
you can get. I have a supply of industrial hook and loop strips. If I
burn the hooks off I just sand them off on my big disk sander and glue
on another layer. But I am always working on the interface pad, not
the original H&L on the disk mandrel.

Thought I sent this earlier, but it never showed up.

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA

Insert inevitable trivial witticism of
your choice.


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Default Source for 3" H&L sanding disk gizmo/backing pad

On 4 Mar, 13:37, "StephenM" wrote:
Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...k_and_Loop___Q...

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA *better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?

Thanks,

Steve


Steve
I do not know if this can be of any help to you but this is the way I
do my sanding.
I buy cloth backed sandpaper in 50 meter rolls 100 mm wide, I make my
own sanding disks from lagbolts and a piece of 8 mm plywood with a 15
mm thick relatively hard foam rubberpiece glued on.On the rubber I
glue on a leather disc, the glue I use is contact cement.
The sandpaper is attached to the sanding pad using hot melt glue.
When I need to change sandpaper I just increase the pressure on the
drill so the sandpaper is heated up till I can remove the old paper
and put a new on.
By the way, I am a produktion turner(non artistic) so I mostly turns
batches, the last one was 40 small bowls for a museum shop. In order
to speed up things I use three drills with 100-120 and 150 grit
sandpapers, in that way I do not need to change papers so often. After
sanding I polish the bowls using steel-wool 000.
Kurt
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On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 10:57:30 -0500, Gerald Ross wrote:

I keep my H&L discs on Velcro strips on the wall, one strip per grit.. Very
handy..

I REALLY like peel & Stick for the heavy sanding... Combined with the 3M ceramic
discs it's an awesome system for my stuff..
The ceramic lasts forever and I don't worry about abusing H&L...
I use a separate, color coded, H&L mandrel for them and have a H&L/PSA adapter
for each grit... (adapters are only $2 each)

I've really slowed down my sanding speed, both on the lathe and the drill..
Paper and pads last longer, the wood doesn't burn, etc..

StephenM wrote:
Like this:

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...e_system?Args=

I find craft supplies' shipping costs to be a bit harsh, so I would like to
entertain alternatives.

Here's my issue: I have a tendency to fry the H&L grippies in these things
*way* too quickly. Like 4 bowls?

I really the way it can eliminate some interior tearout in short order but
it can get a bit expensive. So, in the interest of controlling cost, I have
the following questions:

1. someone posted a source for this stuff a while back. It was a one-guy
outfit that sold presumably top quality abrasives to turners.... might
anyone have that link?

2. Is using an interface pad the way to go for limiting the cost of fried
Velcro?

3. Is PSA better bet?

4. Might I just be using crappy technique, pushing to hard and letting the
abrasive get too hot?

Thanks,

Steve


1. Was it
http://www.vinceswoodnwonders.com/pu...0abrasives.htm
He is a nice guy and the discs are ok but the ones I got were not
color coded and did not have the grit number on the back so was easy
to mix them up. After shopping around for a few years I have settled
on Klingspor disks.

2. Yes

3. No

4. Yes. Keep an air gun nearby, stop sanding frequently and cool
the disk with the compressed air. Sand at 200 rpm or the nearest
you can get. I have a supply of industrial hook and loop strips. If I
burn the hooks off I just sand them off on my big disk sander and glue
on another layer. But I am always working on the interface pad, not
the original H&L on the disk mandrel.

Thought I sent this earlier, but it never showed up.



mac

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