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william kossack
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

After several attempts myself trying to rig something that might work
I've decided I need part of it made by someone more capable.

The basic component I need is a hard steel rod 1/2 to 3/4 in thickness
maybe 18 inches long. One end of the rod needs to be milled with a #2
Morse Taper. The other end needs to be drilled and taped to accept
threaded fittings probably 1/4-3/8ths but any common thread will do.

I can get parts from MSC but assembling the rod from parts will not be
as cheep or as strong as making the entire rod from one piece.

The #2MT needs to be accuratly centered so there is no wabble in the rod
when my lathe is turning.

Can anyone recommend someone local to Denver or not that can make this?
  #2   Report Post  
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Hi Bill

Yes I know you are not asking for this but I think you could make one
that would be as strong as a one piece one, or nearly so.

Busy Bee sells MT 2 and 3 with a soft end, specially made so it can be
machined, they are also threaded for a draw bar if needed.

If you get a rod and drill in your lathe, and then tap the thread, take
the MT and drill for the rod to fit in, then braze the rod into the MT
and you would have a very strong assembly, just get a good tight fit
for the rod so it is straight in the MT.

Just a thought of me.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

  #3   Report Post  
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william kossack
 
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what is the cost of the parts?

MSC has parts I could assemble it with and all I would need to do is cut
the bar to the length I need. However, the cost of the MSC parts would
be about $100 for 2 of them (one bar would be cut into two pieces).

I just think a solid bar would be stronger and possibly less expensive?

wrote:
Hi Bill

Yes I know you are not asking for this but I think you could make one
that would be as strong as a one piece one, or nearly so.

Busy Bee sells MT 2 and 3 with a soft end, specially made so it can be
machined, they are also threaded for a draw bar if needed.

If you get a rod and drill in your lathe, and then tap the thread, take
the MT and drill for the rod to fit in, then braze the rod into the MT
and you would have a very strong assembly, just get a good tight fit
for the rod so it is straight in the MT.

Just a thought of me.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo

  #4   Report Post  
Posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
mac davis
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 07:34:40 -0600, william kossack
wrote:

Bill.. have you talked to Bill Noble yet?
This really sounds like his kind of thing...

http://www.wbnoble.com/



what is the cost of the parts?

MSC has parts I could assemble it with and all I would need to do is cut
the bar to the length I need. However, the cost of the MSC parts would
be about $100 for 2 of them (one bar would be cut into two pieces).

I just think a solid bar would be stronger and possibly less expensive?

wrote:
Hi Bill

Yes I know you are not asking for this but I think you could make one
that would be as strong as a one piece one, or nearly so.

Busy Bee sells MT 2 and 3 with a soft end, specially made so it can be
machined, they are also threaded for a draw bar if needed.

If you get a rod and drill in your lathe, and then tap the thread, take
the MT and drill for the rod to fit in, then braze the rod into the MT
and you would have a very strong assembly, just get a good tight fit
for the rod so it is straight in the MT.

Just a thought of me.

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo


Mac

https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

Hi Bill

The MT 2 price at Busy Bee is $9.99 Can. catalog # B460

Drill rod on special right now at Enco, 5/8"D 36" long, runs $5.59 for
water hardening and $6.99 for oil hardening rod, 5/8" carbon steel
$9.85 for 6 feet long this all $ US

They have a lot more sizes and also air hardening steel which is more
expensive, go to page 634 for more info

So depending on what you chose, the cost would be roughly $10.-- +
$3.-- add shipping cost and your cost a piece probably runs less than
$20.--

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo



  #6   Report Post  
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ebd
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop


William,

The guy I use is great. Gary Crounse (518) 399-3946). He's meticulous
and he's not expensive.

  #7   Report Post  
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william kossack
 
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thanks, I'll make some more phone calls. I got one estimate of $150
yesterday. I've got to concerve cash becuase I'm expecting UPS to bring
some burl caps tomorrow.

ebd wrote:
William,

The guy I use is great. Gary Crounse (518) 399-3946). He's meticulous
and he's not expensive.

  #8   Report Post  
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Arch
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

Hi William,
Your OP was a little vague re hardness of steel and dimensions. If I'm
not prying into details of an invention that you are developing, why do
you need "hard steel" for this device? How hard? Depending on what kind
of hard steel you need, I think shop time & material costs will vary.

You might try rec.crafts.metalworking or similar metal working sites.
I'd think there would be many competent retired or hobby machinists in
the denver area and you might want to establish a local working
relationship for future work.

Again, not meaning to pry, but since you mentioned making several
attempts to make the device, were you attempting to machine it or to
assemble components? If the former and time isn't of the essence and if
you can use a relatively easy to machine steel, with your ability why
not keep on trying.... and learning.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

  #9   Report Post  
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william kossack
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

by hardness I want something besides the mild steel they sell at any
hardware store. One of my attempts was to put a rod into a 4 jaw chuck.
I discovered that it was not exactly straight and quickly wabbled and bent

Arch wrote:
Hi William,
Your OP was a little vague re hardness of steel and dimensions. If I'm
not prying into details of an invention that you are developing, why do
you need "hard steel" for this device? How hard? Depending on what kind
of hard steel you need, I think shop time & material costs will vary.

You might try rec.crafts.metalworking or similar metal working sites.
I'd think there would be many competent retired or hobby machinists in
the denver area and you might want to establish a local working
relationship for future work.

Again, not meaning to pry, but since you mentioned making several
attempts to make the device, were you attempting to machine it or to
assemble components? If the former and time isn't of the essence and if
you can use a relatively easy to machine steel, with your ability why
not keep on trying.... and learning.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

  #10   Report Post  
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Arch
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

William FWIW, for amateur machinists like me, "stressproof", a carbon
cold rolled proprietary steel is a good combo between precise bars,
strength/hardness, machinability and cost, and it's widely available.
Someone might suggest a steel better tailored to your purpose, however.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings



  #11   Report Post  
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william kossack
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

06010482 from MSC was recommened to me originally was item

However, that rod is 3/4 of an inch and the morse taper end mill holder
will go up to 5/8ths

Description Water - Oil - Air Hardening Drill Rod - 36 In. Diameter:
3/4 Tempering Medium: Water Hardening Length: 36
Diameter (Inch) 3/4
Tempering Medium Water Hardening

Or should I pick out a different one

I was also thinking of getting some additional rods for making some
chisels but I'm unsure what to get

Arch wrote:
William FWIW, for amateur machinists like me, "stressproof", a carbon
cold rolled proprietary steel is a good combo between precise bars,
strength/hardness, machinability and cost, and it's widely available.
Someone might suggest a steel better tailored to your purpose, however.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

  #12   Report Post  
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Dan Bollinger
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

Check your Yellow Pages! Any machine shop (not welding shop) can turn tapers
and threads. I would use untreated 3/4" drill rod. It is straight, perfectly
round, and stiffer than cold or hot rolled steel. And machines great. The
socket diameter for MT2 is .700", so a .750" rod is just right. A cantilevered
18" rod is going to have an upper rpm limit, as you have discovered! Dan

After several attempts myself trying to rig something that might work I've
decided I need part of it made by someone more capable.

The basic component I need is a hard steel rod 1/2 to 3/4 in thickness maybe
18 inches long. One end of the rod needs to be milled with a #2 Morse Taper.
The other end needs to be drilled and taped to accept threaded fittings
probably 1/4-3/8ths but any common thread will do.

I can get parts from MSC but assembling the rod from parts will not be as
cheep or as strong as making the entire rod from one piece.

The #2MT needs to be accuratly centered so there is no wabble in the rod when
my lathe is turning.

Can anyone recommend someone local to Denver or not that can make this?


  #13   Report Post  
Posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
GH
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

Sorry if I've misinterpreted what the individual was looking for, but
I think what mich do the trick is a endmill holder.
Morse taper (drilled and tapped for drawbar if desired) to 5/8 bore
with locking grubscrew. (try kbctools.com page 390 of their urrent
catalog)

Hope tis is of some use.
gary


On 12 Apr 2006 11:43:35 -0700, "
wrote:

Hi Bill

The MT 2 price at Busy Bee is $9.99 Can. catalog # B460

Drill rod on special right now at Enco, 5/8"D 36" long, runs $5.59 for
water hardening and $6.99 for oil hardening rod, 5/8" carbon steel
$9.85 for 6 feet long this all $ US

They have a lot more sizes and also air hardening steel which is more
expensive, go to page 634 for more info

So depending on what you chose, the cost would be roughly $10.-- +
$3.-- add shipping cost and your cost a piece probably runs less than
$20.--

Have fun and take care
Leo Van Der Loo


  #14   Report Post  
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william kossack
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

I've called a bunch of local places and can't get anyone to build it for me

Dan Bollinger wrote:
Check your Yellow Pages! Any machine shop (not welding shop) can turn
tapers and threads. I would use untreated 3/4" drill rod. It is
straight, perfectly round, and stiffer than cold or hot rolled steel.
And machines great. The socket diameter for MT2 is .700", so a .750"
rod is just right. A cantilevered 18" rod is going to have an upper
rpm limit, as you have discovered! Dan

After several attempts myself trying to rig something that might work
I've decided I need part of it made by someone more capable.

The basic component I need is a hard steel rod 1/2 to 3/4 in thickness
maybe 18 inches long. One end of the rod needs to be milled with a #2
Morse Taper. The other end needs to be drilled and taped to accept
threaded fittings probably 1/4-3/8ths but any common thread will do.

I can get parts from MSC but assembling the rod from parts will not be
as cheep or as strong as making the entire rod from one piece.

The #2MT needs to be accuratly centered so there is no wabble in the
rod when my lathe is turning.

Can anyone recommend someone local to Denver or not that can make this?



  #15   Report Post  
Posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
Dan Bollinger
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

I've called a bunch of local places and can't get anyone to build it for me

In that case, you are left with finding a hobbyist machinist. I'm not sure how
to go about that, other than to ask around. Dan



  #16   Report Post  
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Owen Lawrence
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

I've called a bunch of local places and can't get anyone to build it for
me

Dan Bollinger wrote:
Check your Yellow Pages! Any machine shop (not welding shop) can turn
tapers and threads. I would use untreated 3/4" drill rod. It is
straight, perfectly round, and stiffer than cold or hot rolled steel. And
machines great. The socket diameter for MT2 is .700", so a .750" rod is
just right. A cantilevered 18" rod is going to have an upper rpm limit,
as you have discovered! Dan

After several attempts myself trying to rig something that might work
I've decided I need part of it made by someone more capable.

The basic component I need is a hard steel rod 1/2 to 3/4 in thickness
maybe 18 inches long. One end of the rod needs to be milled with a #2
Morse Taper. The other end needs to be drilled and taped to accept
threaded fittings probably 1/4-3/8ths but any common thread will do.

I can get parts from MSC but assembling the rod from parts will not be
as cheep or as strong as making the entire rod from one piece.

The #2MT needs to be accuratly centered so there is no wabble in the rod
when my lathe is turning.

Can anyone recommend someone local to Denver or not that can make this?



The chuck on my drill press is driven by a MT#2 that has a short straight
shank on it that fits into the chuck. (JT3 or something) Go to
http://busybeetools.com/, select Products, Arbor, Drill Chuck to see what I
mean. Maybe you can drill and tap the end of one of these. They're not
very expensive.

- Owen -


  #17   Report Post  
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William B Noble (don't reply to this address)
 
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Default anyone know of a good metal working shop

the MT to Jacobs taper adapters are indeed cheap, but they are
frequently hardened.


On Sat, 15 Apr 2006 17:08:42 -0400, "Owen Lawrence"
wrote:



The chuck on my drill press is driven by a MT#2 that has a short straight
shank on it that fits into the chuck. (JT3 or something) Go to
http://busybeetools.com/, select Products, Arbor, Drill Chuck to see what I
mean. Maybe you can drill and tap the end of one of these. They're not
very expensive.

- Owen -

Bill

www.wbnoble.com

to contact me, do not reply to this message,
instead correct this address and use it

will iam_ b_ No ble at msn daught com
*** Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com ***
  #18   Report Post  
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Owen Lawrence
 
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"William B Noble (don't reply to this address)" wrote
in message ...
the MT to Jacobs taper adapters are indeed cheap, but they are
frequently hardened.


Just read back in the message history. Sorry for the 4 day late repeat
suggestion.

- Owen -



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