UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Steve North
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?

TIA

Steve
  #2   Report Post  
Set Square
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Steve North wrote:

I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?

TIA

Steve



See the Gas Fitting FAQ at http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
--
Cheers,
Set Square
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #3   Report Post  
Ed Sirett
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 18:32:25 +0100, Set Square wrote:

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Steve North wrote:

I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?

TIA

Steve



See the Gas Fitting FAQ at

http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html

I don't think I covered this in the FAQ.
I'm fairly sure that acceptable gas joints a

Soldered.
Threaded with gas tape or Boss white
Back-nut and long screw (a coupling method for steel pipe).
Compression where accessible.
I've seen gas appliances which have some sort of internal proprietry couplings
Usully involving a machined ball-cup or cone-cone mating.
Sometime you see ground flat faced couplings usually sealed with a
neoprene washer or maybe a fibre one.

I presume the coupling is like the last one listed in some way.

The installation instruction will say what to do it sounds like the
connection is BSP threaded with a washer at the end.

Is the connection on the boiler a threaded hole or a peice of threaded pipe?
Either way you will want to connect it with the CORRECT fitting.
A smear (and mean only a smear) of boss white may help if seal is made on the
washer against flat metal. Without seeing it I can't say for sure but it
is very likely the manufacturers intend you to seal on the washer NOT the
threads. Which make and model?

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html


  #4   Report Post  
kipper
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances

"Steve North" wrote in message
om...
I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?

TIA

Steve



  #5   Report Post  
Dave Liquorice
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:00:23 +0100, kipper wrote:

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies
to appliances


And get paid for it.

Any "competent person" can do gas work for themselves.

--
Cheers
Dave. pam is missing e-mail





  #6   Report Post  
John Stumbles
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

"kipper" wrote in message
news:Riozc.72$6C3.61@newsfe5-win...
Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances

"Steve North" wrote in message
om...
I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?


oh dear, here we go again

plonk

:-)


  #7   Report Post  
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:00:23 +0100, "kipper"
wrote:

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances



No, we've been through this. Please check earlier threads.

The law requires:

1) Anybody doing gas fitting work to be competent. it does not
define "competent"

2) an employed, self employed person or a firm doing gas fitting for
reward must be a CORGI member and, by implication, be appropriately
qualified.

3) In the case of work on properties rented out, all work must be done
by a CORGI fitter.

The law does not exclude somebody from doing gas fitting work on their
own property but does require them to be competent. The HSE has the
responsibility for enforcement and acknowledges that DIY gas fitting
does take place. It does not say that it is illegal and moreover
does not believe that it causes problems that require legislation.




"Steve North" wrote in message
. com...
I'm about to connect the gas supply to my newly installed boiler and I
need some advice about the compression fitting used. As supplied it is
just a standard tap type connector with a fibre washer as the seal. Is
this sufficient? Do I need to wrap the threads in yellow PVC tape or
apply any sort of compound? Any other things I need to know?

TIA

Steve



..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  #8   Report Post  
Bob Eager
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 20:00:23 UTC, "kipper" wrote:

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances


(all together) .... Oh, no they're not!

(IOW, other people can, and they might even be more 'competent').
--
Bob Eager
begin a new life...dump Windows!
  #9   Report Post  
Andrew Gabriel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

In article .uk,
"Ed Sirett" writes:

I've seen gas appliances which have some sort of internal proprietry couplings
Usully involving a machined ball-cup or cone-cone mating.


The Keston system kit comes with those for making the external
connections for water and gas. IIRC, it has a gas one inside too.
I think they're used where you want a joint which is suitable
for repeated dis/assembly but remains reliable.

I used to service my parents' Ideal Standard boiler (which was
replaced about 5 years ago at the age of 35 years old) and that
used them for the internal gas connections which you had to
disassemble each time you serviced it to get the burner assembly
out. They work very nicely for this purpose.

--
Andrew Gabriel
  #10   Report Post  
Set Square
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article .uk,
"Ed Sirett" writes:

I've seen gas appliances which have some sort of internal proprietry
couplings Usully involving a machined ball-cup or cone-cone mating.


The Keston system kit comes with those for making the external
connections for water and gas. IIRC, it has a gas one inside too.
I think they're used where you want a joint which is suitable
for repeated dis/assembly but remains reliable.

I used to service my parents' Ideal Standard boiler (which was
replaced about 5 years ago at the age of 35 years old) and that
used them for the internal gas connections which you had to
disassemble each time you serviced it to get the burner assembly
out. They work very nicely for this purpose.


I had a couple of Baxi Bermudas in the past - where the gas connection used
a "Crane Joint" - which was a cast iron fitting having male and female
ground conical bits which were held together by a large nut. You had to undo
this to withdraw the burner assemble for servicing or repair operations.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.




  #11   Report Post  
Mike Harrison
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 22:07:33 +0100, Andy Hall wrote:

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:00:23 +0100, "kipper"
wrote:

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances



No, we've been through this. Please check earlier threads.

The law requires:

1) Anybody doing gas fitting work to be competent. it does not
define "competent"

2) an employed, self employed person or a firm doing gas fitting for
reward must be a CORGI member and, by implication, be appropriately
qualified.

3) In the case of work on properties rented out, all work must be done
by a CORGI fitter.

The law does not exclude somebody from doing gas fitting work on their
own property but does require them to be competent. The HSE has the
responsibility for enforcement and acknowledges that DIY gas fitting
does take place. It does not say that it is illegal and moreover
does not believe that it causes problems that require legislation.


...unlike the morons behing the proposed Part P building regs, who believe that an electrical expert
is not 'competent' unless they have paid membership to the appropriate 'trade body' cartel....


  #12   Report Post  
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas compression fittings - how to make good?

On Tue, 15 Jun 2004 10:22:01 +0100, Mike Harrison
wrote:

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 22:07:33 +0100, Andy Hall wrote:

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:00:23 +0100, "kipper"
wrote:

Only Corgi registered plumbers are allowed to connect gas supplies to
appliances



No, we've been through this. Please check earlier threads.

The law requires:

1) Anybody doing gas fitting work to be competent. it does not
define "competent"

2) an employed, self employed person or a firm doing gas fitting for
reward must be a CORGI member and, by implication, be appropriately
qualified.

3) In the case of work on properties rented out, all work must be done
by a CORGI fitter.

The law does not exclude somebody from doing gas fitting work on their
own property but does require them to be competent. The HSE has the
responsibility for enforcement and acknowledges that DIY gas fitting
does take place. It does not say that it is illegal and moreover
does not believe that it causes problems that require legislation.


..unlike the morons behing the proposed Part P building regs, who believe that an electrical expert
is not 'competent' unless they have paid membership to the appropriate 'trade body' cartel....

Indeed. I wrote letters to MPs, government ministers and to the IEE
pointing out the phony statistics and the error of their ways, as did
others. The seed fell on stony ground.


..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Avoiding brush stokes - getting a good painted finish Frank W UK diy 5 August 21st 03 03:59 PM
I LOVE Speedfit! David W.E. Roberts UK diy 53 August 14th 03 05:05 PM
Making a ruin into something habitable. Liz UK diy 140 August 12th 03 12:03 PM
Electronic/Automatic welding masks - a good thing? Frank UK diy 1 July 21st 03 12:39 PM
jointing oil fittings Stanley Spanner UK diy 7 July 7th 03 02:35 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"