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Simon
 
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Default Replacing single glazed glass with Double Glazed - Wooden Windows

Hi there,

The downstairs bay windows in my house (double bay 1920's) were
replaced with Double Glazed units some years before I bought the place.
There are a few remaining single glazed windows that I would like to
replace with double glazed glass, but want to keep costs to a minimum.

Could I simply replace each single pane of glass with a custom made
sealed double glazed pane in each existing wooden framed window? The
windows have been well maintained over the years and are in v good
condition.

Would I just use putty or beading to hold the window in place? Would I
also be ok to do this to replace the glass in the first floor bay?

And lastly, if I'm ok to do the above - can anyone recommend a supplier
in the Cardiff area?

Thanks in advance!!!!

Simon

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Mary Fisher
 
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"Simon" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi there,

The downstairs bay windows in my house (double bay 1920's) were
replaced with Double Glazed units some years before I bought the place.
There are a few remaining single glazed windows that I would like to
replace with double glazed glass, but want to keep costs to a minimum.

Could I simply replace each single pane of glass with a custom made
sealed double glazed pane in each existing wooden framed window? The
windows have been well maintained over the years and are in v good
condition.


Yes, we've done our entire house like that. It's cheaper and less disruptive
than getting the plastic boys in, you can do each pane at once and at your
own pace. We spread the labour and cost over two or three years and hardly
noticed it.

Would I just use putty or beading to hold the window in place? Would I
also be ok to do this to replace the glass in the first floor bay?


We did - a round bay with five big and five small lights.

I'm looking now, it must have been silicone 'putty'.

And lastly, if I'm ok to do the above - can anyone recommend a supplier
in the Cardiff area?


No, look in Yellow Pages for glass suppliers and ask them if they do custome
made units. Our local one, luckily, is only a mile from home and very, very
helpful.

Mary


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Simon
 
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Mary,

Thanks for your comments - sounds like I'm going to save a bundle on
replacing our windows! Anyone else had any experience replacing single
glazed glass with sealed double glazed units?

Simon

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Cicero
 
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Default


"Simon" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi there,

The downstairs bay windows in my house (double bay 1920's) were
replaced with Double Glazed units some years before I bought the place.
There are a few remaining single glazed windows that I would like to
replace with double glazed glass, but want to keep costs to a minimum.

Could I simply replace each single pane of glass with a custom made
sealed double glazed pane in each existing wooden framed window? The
windows have been well maintained over the years and are in v good
condition.

Would I just use putty or beading to hold the window in place? Would I
also be ok to do this to replace the glass in the first floor bay?

And lastly, if I'm ok to do the above - can anyone recommend a supplier
in the Cardiff area?

Thanks in advance!!!!

Simon

================
You need to check that the rebates are deep enough to accept the DG units.
They're usually a minimum of 11mm thick which is quite a bit thicker than
standard glass (4mm). Beading is quicker and easier than putty and looks
much neater unless you're an expert with the putty knife. You'll still need
a seal between glass and beading, applied with a mastic gun.

Some older windows have nailed-in sub frames or opening lights which can be
removed completely to accept much thicker DG units. It depends on what
appearance you prefer.

Cic.



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Mary Fisher
 
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"Cicero" wrote in message
. uk...

You need to check that the rebates are deep enough to accept the DG units.
They're usually a minimum of 11mm thick which is quite a bit thicker than
standard glass (4mm). Beading is quicker and easier than putty and looks
much neater unless you're an expert with the putty knife.


It also reduced the area of glass by quite a lot, thus negating one of the
benefits of using the original frames..

Mary





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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article .com,
Simon wrote:
Thanks for your comments - sounds like I'm going to save a bundle on
replacing our windows! Anyone else had any experience replacing single
glazed glass with sealed double glazed units?


You need to use a flexible way of mounting the DG panels in a wood frame.
Traditional putty doesn't flex, and movement of the wood will cause the DG
unit to fail early.

--
*The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default

In article ,
Mary Fisher wrote:
You need to check that the rebates are deep enough to accept the DG
units. They're usually a minimum of 11mm thick which is quite a bit
thicker than standard glass (4mm). Beading is quicker and easier than
putty and looks much neater unless you're an expert with the putty
knife.


It also reduced the area of glass by quite a lot, thus negating one of
the benefits of using the original frames..


You must have *very* small windows. ;-)

--
*How many roads must a man travel down before he admits he is lost? *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Stuart Noble
 
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You need to check that the rebates are deep enough to accept the DG units.
They're usually a minimum of 11mm thick which is quite a bit thicker than
standard glass (4mm).

You can get sealed units where the front section is bigger and sits in the
old rebate. The rest protrudes into the room, which can either look okay or
a bit naff, depending on the thickness of the wooden frames and the units .


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Simon
 
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Default


Stuart Noble wrote:
You need to check that the rebates are deep enough to accept the DG

units.
They're usually a minimum of 11mm thick which is quite a bit

thicker than
standard glass (4mm).

You can get sealed units where the front section is bigger and sits

in the
old rebate. The rest protrudes into the room, which can either look

okay or
a bit naff, depending on the thickness of the wooden frames and the

units .

Sounds interesting - I suppose I could get a decent gap between the
glass this way - do you know of any suppliers or should a standard
glazier be able to sort me out something like this?

Thanks

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