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Old April 29th 04, 02:26 PM
Stephen Fasham
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

I have an 18th century house (no DPC) which is lime plastered on the
inside. I am doing quite a lot of work to the house and need to get
quite a lot of plastering done. I was planning to use lime plaster on
the ground floor, and the ordinary gypsum stuff on the upper floors
where damp is not an issue. Does anyone have an idea of how much extra
the lime plastering will cost, and should I persuade a plasterer to
'have a go' or get a specialist?

Please don't suggest that it's easy and I should do it myself, as
plastering is the one and only job I'm NOT doing. Plumbing, wiring,
central heating installation, bricklaying etc. YES but plastering NO!!

Fash

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Old April 29th 04, 03:15 PM
Andy
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

Take a look at
http://www.buildingconservation.com

There are many useful articles and a list of specilaists in all areas. Also
try you local conservation officer at the council. In my experience it
probably isnt worth trying to persuade a plasterer to have a go. Although
they would certainly possess the neccersary skills most will think that you
just want some builders lime (hydrated lime) added to ordinay gypsum stuff -
this is not what you want.


"Stephen Fasham" wrote in message
om...
I have an 18th century house (no DPC) which is lime plastered on the
inside. I am doing quite a lot of work to the house and need to get
quite a lot of plastering done. I was planning to use lime plaster on
the ground floor, and the ordinary gypsum stuff on the upper floors
where damp is not an issue. Does anyone have an idea of how much extra
the lime plastering will cost, and should I persuade a plasterer to
'have a go' or get a specialist?

Please don't suggest that it's easy and I should do it myself, as
plastering is the one and only job I'm NOT doing. Plumbing, wiring,
central heating installation, bricklaying etc. YES but plastering NO!!

Fash



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Old April 29th 04, 11:15 PM
Peter Taylor
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

"Andy" wrote in message
...
Take a look at
http://www.buildingconservation.com

most will think that you just want some builders lime (hydrated lime) added to

ordinay gypsum stuff - this is not what you want.

Maybe I'm wrong, but can't you use Hydrated Lime to make the lime putty? It
would work out a lot cheaper probably. I seem to remember at college years ago
learning about slaking pits and lime putty mixers

Peter

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Old April 30th 04, 01:25 AM
andrewpreece
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum


"Peter Taylor" wrote in message
...
"Andy" wrote in message
...
Take a look at
http://www.buildingconservation.com

most will think that you just want some builders lime (hydrated lime)

added to
ordinay gypsum stuff - this is not what you want.

Maybe I'm wrong, but can't you use Hydrated Lime to make the lime putty?

It
would work out a lot cheaper probably. I seem to remember at college

years ago
learning about slaking pits and lime putty mixers

Peter


That's what I've been using to make lime putty/mortar: hydrated
non-hydraulic lime. As I understand it in the old days limestone would be
roasted to get quicklime ( CaO) then doused with water to get slaked lime
( CaOH? ). I'm pretty sure slaked lime is the same as hydrated lime, so
you don't have to contend with dealing with quicklime, which is caustic
stuff.

Andy


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Old April 30th 04, 07:16 AM
Anna Kettle
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

Maybe I'm wrong, but can't you use Hydrated Lime to make the lime putty?
It
would work out a lot cheaper probably. I seem to remember at college

years ago
learning about slaking pits and lime putty mixers

Peter


That's what I've been using to make lime putty/mortar: hydrated
non-hydraulic lime. As I understand it in the old days limestone would be
roasted to get quicklime ( CaO) then doused with water to get slaked lime
( CaOH? ). I'm pretty sure slaked lime is the same as hydrated lime, so
you don't have to contend with dealing with quicklime, which is caustic
stuff.


You can use hydrated lime to make lime putty (put it in a tub of water
overnight to soak) but who would bother these days when a ready
prepared tub of lime putty is available ex stock from Jewsons. In the
old days ie 5 years ago, lime putty was much harder to get hold of and
hydrated lime was sometimes the only easy source.

Quicklime is the previous stage in the manufacturing process so there
is no need to bother about that unless you are a keen home lime
producer (and there are a surprisingly large number of them)

The Building Conservation Directory as recommended above is a good but
expensive source of lime plasterers. It costs an arm and a leg to
advertise there so your average lime plasterer (like me) won't be able
to justify it. I suggest you speak to the conservartion officer of
your local council who will give you a list of local names

Anna
--
~~ Anna Kettle, Suffolk, England
|""""| ~ Plaster conservation, freehand modelling in lime
/ ^^ \ // Overmantels, pargeting etc
|____| www.kettlenet.co.uk 01359 230642



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Old April 30th 04, 09:13 AM
Andy
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

Yes you can use Hydrated Lime to make lime putty but this is considered
inferior. The point I was making was (in general) builders/plasterers when
asked whether they work with lime plasters or mortars think it means adding
a quantity of hydrated lime to a gypsum plaster or cement based mortar or
render - which is not what is required for period property restoration.

Im interested to here that lime putty is available at Jewsons.

Pity you live in Suffolk Anna. (Pity for me that is !).

"Anna Kettle" wrote in message
...
Maybe I'm wrong, but can't you use Hydrated Lime to make the lime

putty?
It
would work out a lot cheaper probably. I seem to remember at college

years ago
learning about slaking pits and lime putty mixers

Peter


That's what I've been using to make lime putty/mortar: hydrated
non-hydraulic lime. As I understand it in the old days limestone would be
roasted to get quicklime ( CaO) then doused with water to get slaked lime
( CaOH? ). I'm pretty sure slaked lime is the same as hydrated lime, so
you don't have to contend with dealing with quicklime, which is caustic
stuff.


You can use hydrated lime to make lime putty (put it in a tub of water
overnight to soak) but who would bother these days when a ready
prepared tub of lime putty is available ex stock from Jewsons. In the
old days ie 5 years ago, lime putty was much harder to get hold of and
hydrated lime was sometimes the only easy source.

Quicklime is the previous stage in the manufacturing process so there
is no need to bother about that unless you are a keen home lime
producer (and there are a surprisingly large number of them)

The Building Conservation Directory as recommended above is a good but
expensive source of lime plasterers. It costs an arm and a leg to
advertise there so your average lime plasterer (like me) won't be able
to justify it. I suggest you speak to the conservartion officer of
your local council who will give you a list of local names

Anna
--
~~ Anna Kettle, Suffolk, England
|""""| ~ Plaster conservation, freehand modelling in lime
/ ^^ \ // Overmantels, pargeting etc
|____| www.kettlenet.co.uk 01359 230642



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Old April 30th 04, 07:29 PM
John Rouse
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

In article , Andy
writes

There are many useful articles and a list of specilaists in all areas. Also
try you local conservation officer at the council. In my experience it
probably isnt worth trying to persuade a plasterer to have a go. Although
they would certainly possess the neccersary skills most will think that you
just want some builders lime (hydrated lime) added to ordinay gypsum stuff -
this is not what you want.


Try asking them if they slake their own lime - it doesn't matter whether
or not they do, its the response that counts - "Yer wot" is a bit of a
give-away.

J.
--
John Rouse
  #9   Report Post  
Old April 30th 04, 07:32 PM
John Rouse
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

In article , Stephen
Fasham writes
I have an 18th century house (no DPC) which is lime plastered on the
inside. I am doing quite a lot of work to the house and need to get
quite a lot of plastering done. I was planning to use lime plaster on
the ground floor, and the ordinary gypsum stuff on the upper floors
where damp is not an issue. Does anyone have an idea of how much extra
the lime plastering will cost, and should I persuade a plasterer to
'have a go' or get a specialist?


Lime plastering should be cheaper, the materials are cheaper, and any
that falls to the floor can be re-used, unlike gypsum (as long as the
floor is clean), so there is less wastage. As the plaster can be worked
for longer, its easier to apply, the only downside is that it takes
longer to set.

Please don't suggest that it's easy and I should do it myself, as
plastering is the one and only job I'm NOT doing. Plumbing, wiring,
central heating installation, bricklaying etc. YES but plastering NO!!


Lime plastering is quite different to gypsum plastering - for one thing
you're not working against the clock so much.

If you're anywhere in the middle of England, give Dean Hicks in Derby a
call, he's done a lot of lime rendering, including quite a few straw
bale houses, and our 150 year old pile.

J.
--
John Rouse
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Old April 30th 04, 08:49 PM
Andrew Gabriel
 
Posts: n/a
Default lime plastering - expected costs vs gypsum

In article ,
John Rouse writes:
Lime plastering should be cheaper, the materials are cheaper, and any
that falls to the floor can be re-used, unlike gypsum (as long as the
floor is clean), so there is less wastage. As the plaster can be worked
for longer, its easier to apply, the only downside is that it takes
longer to set.


In my experience, the cost of the materials (for gypsum plastering)
is quite insignificant compared to the labour cost (like about 1/10th).

Lime plastering is quite different to gypsum plastering - for one thing
you're not working against the clock so much.


No one's mentioned the horse hair yet...

--
Andrew Gabriel


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