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Default Smoke alarms for rooms where people smoke

Will ionisation smoke alarms be triggered by smokers? (I assume that
optical alarms almost inevitable will).

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Chris Green
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Mike
 
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wrote in message ...
Will ionisation smoke alarms be triggered by smokers? (I assume that
optical alarms almost inevitable will).


Use the ones made with depleted uranium in the detector and hopefully the
problem will go away.


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BigWallop
 
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wrote in message ...
Will ionisation smoke alarms be triggered by smokers? (I assume that
optical alarms almost inevitable will).

Chris Green


You need something like a rate of rise heat detector rather than a smoke
detector.


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Mike wrote:

wrote in message ...
Will ionisation smoke alarms be triggered by smokers? (I assume that
optical alarms almost inevitable will).


Use the ones made with depleted uranium in the detector and hopefully the
problem will go away.

I don't have a problem, but I don;t want to crete one either. A smoke
alarm that goes off when there's not a fire (i.e. with cigarette
smoke) is useless.

When you say "the ones made with depleted uranium in the detector" is
this any sort of ionisation smake detector? That's the question I
originally asked really.

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Chris Green
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RichardS noone@invalid wrote:

There's got to be some solution to this - after all many hotels have smoke
detectors and also have smoking bedrooms. Why not call a manufacturer and
see what the suggest, of failing that your area's fire prevention officer?

My attempts at getting a response from either manufacturers or the
Suffolk fire service have failed completely so far. Maybe I could try
London fire service as the flat is in London.

--
Chris Green
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Ben Schofield
 
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wrote:

My attempts at getting a response from either manufacturers or the
Suffolk fire service have failed completely so far. Maybe I could try
London fire service as the flat is in London.


The trick is to spell ionisation as ionization when googling :-). Then
you get advice such as this, from
http://www.dps.state.mn.us/fmarshal/...etectors.html:

IONIZATION VERSUS PHOTOELECTRIC DETECTORS

In cases where smoke detectors are subject to frequent false alarming
due to cooking, smoking or similar causes, the State Fire Marshal
encourages the installation of photoelectric smoke detectors as they
are not as susceptible to these types of false activation.

Studies have shown that ionization detectors are better at detecting
small, invisible particles of combustion that are typically present
from fast, hot, flaming fires. These studies have also shown that
photoelectric detectors are better at detecting larger, visible smoke
particles that are more commonly seen from slow, smoldering fires. Both
types of smoke detectors have been shown to be effective in detecting
typical residential-type fires. Some research seems to indicate that
photoelectric detectors may activate slightly sooner as many
residential fires start out as slow, smoldering fires.

So photoelectric appears to be the way to go...

Ben.
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wrote:
wrote:
RichardS noone@invalid wrote:

There's got to be some solution to this - after all many hotels have smoke
detectors and also have smoking bedrooms. Why not call a manufacturer and
see what the suggest, of failing that your area's fire prevention officer?

My attempts at getting a response from either manufacturers or the
Suffolk fire service have failed completely so far. Maybe I could try
London fire service as the flat is in London.

Not a lot of help there either.

If you hunt around for contact details of a 'fire prevention officer'
you can rarely find anything. The fire brigade sites have lots of
links to publicity campaigns and government sites saying how we should
fit smoke alarms etc., etc. but there's not a lot of real information
on how to go beyond sticking a cheap battery alarm in the hall and in
the landing.

In fact if you do a Google UK sites search for "fire prevention officer"
you get very few hits for any actual such beings. Most of the hits
are suggesting you get in touch with one or about people who were one
once.

I also tried phoning the local fire brigade for the flat in London.
The response there was that they get so many requests like this that
they ask people to put the request in writing and 'someone will get
back to you'. Not a very useful response as one really needs to have
a bit of a 'conversation' to get soemthing helpful in response to this
sort of question.

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Chris Green
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Ben Schofield wrote:
wrote:

My attempts at getting a response from either manufacturers or the
Suffolk fire service have failed completely so far. Maybe I could try
London fire service as the flat is in London.


The trick is to spell ionisation as ionization when googling :-). Then
you get advice such as this, from
http://www.dps.state.mn.us/fmarshal/...etectors.html:

IONIZATION VERSUS PHOTOELECTRIC DETECTORS

In cases where smoke detectors are subject to frequent false alarming
due to cooking, smoking or similar causes, the State Fire Marshal
encourages the installation of photoelectric smoke detectors as they
are not as susceptible to these types of false activation.

OK, thanks, while everywhere describes the difference between
ionisation and photoelectric detectors this is the first I've seen
that specifically says photoelectric is less susceptible to false
alarms from cigarette smoke.

--
Chris Green
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On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 21:25:26 +0000, Pete C
wrote:


IME ionisation alarms can detect a few molecules of singed toast,
optical are better in this regard.


Are there any good web sites aimed at the residential market that list
all the different types of detectors for sale?

Graham




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Junior Member
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by
Will ionisation smoke alarms be triggered by smokers? (I assume that
optical alarms almost inevitable will).

--
Chris Green

BigWallop has already given the correct answer. A rate of rise temperature sensor is the typr of thing that would be installed if you had a company come out and fit one...
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Gel
 
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You're right Ion type will be more tolerant of fag smoke.
There are specific detectors to detect cigarette smoke;
pse post back if you need info on them.

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Morten
 
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"Gel" wrote in message
oups.com...
You're right Ion type will be more tolerant of fag smoke.
There are specific detectors to detect cigarette smoke;
pse post back if you need info on them.


I need info on them, I want the alarm to go off when SWMBO smokes a fag or
two, She's supposed to go outside but I frequently finds ash trays in the
livingroom and our office.....


And she had stopped smoking so many time it's unreal :-)


/Morten




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Gel
 
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Been unable to respond for days; now found way round, ignoring normal
hypalink.

See
http://www.radaltechnology.com/home....579e853950a 2

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Gel
 
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Here's right link without clutter!

http://www.radaltechnology.com/

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