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Old August 1st 03, 01:38 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!

Just thought I would re-iterate my love for Speedfit.

I can't solder to save my life, despite years of trying.
I have made many successful soldered joints.
However I have made at least the same number of unsuccessful ones, and they
are generally a b*ggger to fix once the water has been turned on and off
again.

I was using compression joints prior to discovering Speedfit.
..
I have just fitted a few compression joints in an area where I wanted to use
copper because it is stronger than plastic and I wanted it to be self
supporting.
[Also I had run out of Speedfit joints and had some legacy compression
joints]
It all worked, but took ages, plus two spanners and a load of PTFE tape.
One joint leaked a little, but was cured by undoing and re-fitting with
extra PTFE round the thread plus some PTFE round the olive.

Compare this to Speedfit:

Snip pipe
Insert ends
Push into joints
Job done, no leaks.

Our old plumber, with his trusty blow lamp and moleskin for sweating lead
pipes (done that too, a couple of times) may be turning in his grave.

However, let us lift a brimming glass to John Guest and Speedfit - saviours
of the marginally incompetent!

Cheers
Dave R

--




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Old August 1st 03, 02:51 PM
Tim Mitchell
 
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Default I LOVE Speedfit!

In article , David W.E.
Roberts writes
.
I have just fitted a few compression joints in an area where I wanted to use
copper because it is stronger than plastic and I wanted it to be self
supporting.
[Also I had run out of Speedfit joints and had some legacy compression
joints]
It all worked, but took ages, plus two spanners and a load of PTFE tape.
One joint leaked a little, but was cured by undoing and re-fitting with
extra PTFE round the thread plus some PTFE round the olive.

I found that using PTFE tape on compression joints makes them leak more
rather than less, so I stopped using it. Subsequently I have got into
soldering instead.
--
Tim Mitchell
  #3   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 03:49 PM
Grunff
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!

Tim Mitchell wrote:

I found that using PTFE tape on compression joints makes them leak more
rather than less, so I stopped using it.


There's really no reason to put PTFE or any goop on compression
joints - it's a metal/metal seal.

--
Grunff

  #4   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 04:23 PM
Dave Plowman
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!

In article ,
David W.E. Roberts wrote:
I can't solder to save my life, despite years of trying.


Then you must be doing something awfully wrong - it's hardly rocket
science and only takes minutes to master.

I have made many successful soldered joints.



However I have made at least the same number of unsuccessful ones, and
they are generally a b*ggger to fix once the water has been turned on
and off again.


So did you ever wonder what was the difference?

I've only ever had one joint leak out of hundreds, and that turned out to
be a faulty end feed fitting - it had a pin hole in it.

--
*When the chips are down, the buffalo is empty.

Dave Plowman London SW 12
RIP Acorn
  #5   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 04:37 PM
IMM
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!


"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in message
...
Just thought I would re-iterate my love for Speedfit.

I can't solder to save my life, despite years of trying.
I have made many successful soldered joints.
However I have made at least the same number of unsuccessful ones, and

they
are generally a b*ggger to fix once the water has been turned on and off
again.

I was using compression joints prior to discovering Speedfit.
.
I have just fitted a few compression joints in an area where I wanted to

use
copper because it is stronger than plastic and I wanted it to be self
supporting.
[Also I had run out of Speedfit joints and had some legacy compression
joints]
It all worked, but took ages, plus two spanners and a load of PTFE tape.
One joint leaked a little, but was cured by undoing and re-fitting with
extra PTFE round the thread plus some PTFE round the olive.

Compare this to Speedfit:

Snip pipe
Insert ends
Push into joints
Job done, no leaks.

Our old plumber, with his trusty blow lamp and moleskin for sweating lead
pipes (done that too, a couple of times) may be turning in his grave.

However, let us lift a brimming glass to John Guest and Speedfit -

saviours
of the marginally incompetent!


Marley make a better system. If you are kak handed and can't solder, then
try using cheap copper pipe and brass push-fit fitting. Cheaper to install
than using all Speedfit. What is it? Speedfit are now in another fitting
re-design and Hep2O in about the 3rd or 4th. Plastic is no panacea get that
clear.



---
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Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.488 / Virus Database: 287 - Release Date: 05/06/2003




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Old August 1st 03, 04:49 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!


"Dave Plowman" wrote in message
...
In article ,
David W.E. Roberts wrote:
I can't solder to save my life, despite years of trying.


Then you must be doing something awfully wrong - it's hardly rocket
science and only takes minutes to master.


Bear in mind that this is a personal opinion.
You find it easy.
I don't.


I have made many successful soldered joints.



However I have made at least the same number of unsuccessful ones, and
they are generally a b*ggger to fix once the water has been turned on
and off again.


So did you ever wonder what was the difference?


No, no mate - never gave it a thought.
Didn't even consider I might be doing it wrong.

WOW! Flash of inspiration.

Hey - why don't you get a job as a motivational speaker.
I bet you'd wow the crowds with your deep insights!


I've only ever had one joint leak out of hundreds, and that turned out to
be a faulty end feed fitting - it had a pin hole in it.

--
*When the chips are down, the buffalo is empty.

Dave Plowman London SW 12
RIP Acorn



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Old August 1st 03, 06:07 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!


"BillR" wrote in message
...
David W.E. Roberts wrote:
Just thought I would re-iterate my love for Speedfit.

I can't solder to save my life, despite years of trying.
I have made many successful soldered joints.
However I have made at least the same number of unsuccessful ones,
and they are generally a b*ggger to fix once the water has been
turned on and off again.

snip
However, let us lift a brimming glass to John Guest and Speedfit -
saviours of the marginally incompetent!

Cheers
Dave R


I love speedfit too but tend to solder where the pipe is exposed and I

want
it to look neater or more compact.
The secret of getting a solder joint right 1st time imho is
a) clean pipe and inside fittings with wire wool. Ignore how clean or new
they look, just do it.
b) use flux.
If its had water in it already and it can't be made perfectly dry, I use
compression.


Yep - tried that - always used the trusty wire wool and then flux.
My problem was I could never get the heating quite right.
I tried various high and low heat nozzles on my Gaz blow lamp, but to no
avail.
Heating the pipe near the joint, heating the joint, heating away from the
joint for a slower raise in temperature.
There seemed to be about a microsecond between no solder and the 'spifzz' as
the ring of solder spat out of the yorkshire joint.

Usually ended up tinning the end of the copper pipe with solder and then
easing gently in.
Used a load of solder but usually worked in the end.

As you say, those that leaked were often easier to replace with compression.

After a while I decided that the general trauma of trying to solder plus the
time wasted justified using compression joints for everything.

I also found it much easier to dis-assemble and re-assemble compression
fittings.

Now I have started using the push fit joints and they seem so far ahead of
compresssion joints that they will be my joint of choice in future
(until/unless various dire predictions on this thread come to pass).

Thanks
Dave R


  #8   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 06:30 PM
IMM
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!


"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in message
...

Now I have started using the push fit joints and they seem so far ahead of
compresssion joints


Push-fit are no match for compressions joints. There is some junk out there.
but a good quality compression fitting will last eons. It is a firm well
made joint of metal to metal. 50-60 years ago people were saying the same
about compression that you are saying about push-fit, in praising their cold
fitting ease of use, speed in installation, etc, but reservations over
longevity and high fitting cost. Over the 60 years that compression has
become widespread they have been proven a success....and cheaper than
push-fit. Let's see if many push-fit fitting are still around in 60 years
time.



---
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Version: 6.0.488 / Virus Database: 287 - Release Date: 05/06/2003


  #9   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 08:07 PM
Mike Ring
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!

"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in
:

Heating the pipe near the joint, heating the joint, heating away from
the joint for a slower raise in temperature.
There seemed to be about a microsecond between no solder and the
'spifzz' as the ring of solder spat out of the yorkshire joint.

Usually ended up tinning the end of the copper pipe with solder and
then easing gently in.
Used a load of solder but usually worked in the end.

You may have missed one essential - apologies if you haven't - and that is
to make sure the end of the run is open to the air.

If there's a tap or valve, make sure it's open, if not the expanding air
due to heat will blow out the joint.

You can also tlerate some water not too close if there is no chance for a
pressure build up

HTH

mike r
  #10   Report Post  
Old August 1st 03, 08:50 PM
StealthUK
 
Posts: n/a
Default I LOVE Speedfit!

Speedfit has its advantages, but under floor boards I would still
rather have a soldered joint. Mind you, I wouldn't trust compression
fittings under boards either. I love speedfit as well but last year I
used some 22mm speedfit tank connectors and the pipes kept leaking
unless the pipe was totally square to the fitting. After much headache
I ended up having to use compression fittings. I'm going to be running
some speedfit in a couple of bathrooms soon but am going to make sure
that any connections are not boxed in. Another thing that concerns me
is the super seal pipe insert with the extra rubber seal - why is this
needed if the normal connection is so good?


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