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Old July 4th 03, 12:04 PM
John
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

Two questions really: Our semi (c.1962) has a concrete slab outside the
front door, approx 2m by 1.5m. I feel I ought to replace it ...

(1) Not only is it very grotty by now, but it has sunk by about 3.5cm,
away from under the front step. (If you see what I mean: the front step
is of course a big concrete block which presumably is built into the
walls; you step down on to the concrete slab; the slab was originally
laid flush up to, and under the front edge of, the step; there's now a
3.5cm gap between the top of te lsab and the bottom of the step.)
Question: should I be worried that the slab has sunk by such a depth
over the years?

(2) Question: If I just break up the slab in situ, and possibly remove
an inch or two of the rubble, can I save on new concrete by just using
it as (rather deep) hardcore?

Cheers - (and thanks for all the inestimable advice gleaned by us
lurkers!)
John

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Old July 4th 03, 04:22 PM
BigWallop
 
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Default Concrete slab advice


"John" wrote in message
...
Two questions really: Our semi (c.1962) has a concrete slab outside the
front door, approx 2m by 1.5m. I feel I ought to replace it ...

(1) Not only is it very grotty by now, but it has sunk by about 3.5cm,
away from under the front step. (If you see what I mean: the front step
is of course a big concrete block which presumably is built into the
walls; you step down on to the concrete slab; the slab was originally
laid flush up to, and under the front edge of, the step; there's now a
3.5cm gap between the top of te lsab and the bottom of the step.)
Question: should I be worried that the slab has sunk by such a depth
over the years?

(2) Question: If I just break up the slab in situ, and possibly remove
an inch or two of the rubble, can I save on new concrete by just using
it as (rather deep) hardcore?

Cheers - (and thanks for all the inestimable advice gleaned by us
lurkers!)
John


Hi John,

Seen this before many, many times, and the only answer is to take the lot
away and build up the ground below it ready for a new pour of concrete.

What happens when you add to the surface of it is, you're also adding more
weight to it, and so you make it sink faster. If you take the whole thing
away and treat the ground underneath with a new bonding of modern fibre
webbing and build it back to where it should be. Then shutter it off to
size and pour a new base, then it will last a whole lot longer. The one
that's there has lasted since 1962, so you can expect the new one, if done
right, to last just as long. How do the old timers say it ? "Will see my
boots off" :-))


---
BigWallop

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Old July 7th 03, 09:23 AM
John
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

In article ,
"Roger Mills" wrote:

John wrote

(1) Not only is it very grotty by now, but it has sunk by about 3.5cm,...


Is it still moving? [You can tell by accurately measuring the gap a number
of times over (say) a 6-month period.] Has it sunk uniformly?


Yes, I guess it is. I suppose it has sunk about 2.5cm in the 16 years
we've been in the house.

If it is not moving, and is level but just too low, I would be tempted
simply to lay some decorative slabs on top of the concrete to make up the
level. Might even look nicer! It will be a lot easier and cheaper than
starting from scratch - and you won't have lost all that much if it fails.


Good idea, but I'm [now!] aware of the advice proffered by BigWallop,
which was that adding more on top will just make it heavier and cause it
to sink faster!

I might grit my teeth and get some quotes for having this replaced, and
also re-doing the drive, with which this slab connects (via another
slab).

If I were younger and less weedy (I'm a "slim 55 year old") I'd have
had the whole lot up by now and be hand-mixing piles of concrete! But
one of the lessons you learn on your way to 55 is that ... concrete is
very heavy!

Cheers
John
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Old July 8th 03, 08:39 AM
Ophelia
 
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Default Concrete slab advice


"BigWallop" wrote in message
...

"John" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Roger Mills" wrote:

John wrote

(1) Not only is it very grotty by now, but it has sunk by about

3.5cm,...

Is it still moving? [You can tell by accurately measuring the gap a

number
of times over (say) a 6-month period.] Has it sunk uniformly?


Yes, I guess it is. I suppose it has sunk about 2.5cm in the 16 years
we've been in the house.

If it is not moving, and is level but just too low, I would be tempted
simply to lay some decorative slabs on top of the concrete to make up

the
level. Might even look nicer! It will be a lot easier and cheaper than
starting from scratch - and you won't have lost all that much if it

fails.

Good idea, but I'm [now!] aware of the advice proffered by BigWallop,
which was that adding more on top will just make it heavier and cause it
to sink faster!

I might grit my teeth and get some quotes for having this replaced, and
also re-doing the drive, with which this slab connects (via another
slab).

If I were younger and less weedy (I'm a "slim 55 year old") I'd have
had the whole lot up by now and be hand-mixing piles of concrete! But
one of the lessons you learn on your way to 55 is that ... concrete is
very heavy!

Cheers
John


And old age doesn't come by itself either John. :-)) You also go through
the eye sight thing, the bone creaking, the hair lose and all the other

bits
and pieces. But, can someone tell me why, oh why, am I going to need such
long nose hairs now that I'm getting older. It's not as if I can comb it
over the top of my head. :-))


LOL


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Old July 8th 03, 11:29 PM
geoff
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

In message , BigWallop
writes

If I were younger and less weedy (I'm a "slim 55 year old") I'd have
had the whole lot up by now and be hand-mixing piles of concrete! But
one of the lessons you learn on your way to 55 is that ... concrete is
very heavy!

Cheers
John


And old age doesn't come by itself either John. :-)) You also go through
the eye sight thing, the bone creaking, the hair lose and all the other bits
and pieces. But, can someone tell me why, oh why, am I going to need such
long nose hairs now that I'm getting older. It's not as if I can comb it
over the top of my head. :-))

Plait it in a macho manner
--
geoff


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Old July 9th 03, 02:07 AM
BigWallop
 
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Default Concrete slab advice


"Gnube" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 07:37:06 GMT, "BigWallop"
wrote:

And old age doesn't come by itself either John. :-)) You also go

through
the eye sight thing, the bone creaking,


Now he tells us! I am just discovering that I am a "fast ageing" 47
and just had to get my first ever pair of specs about a month back;
last night this lead to something catching my attention while I was
shaving yesterday - now I can see clearer, I notice the milky rings
that are very likely the early stages of cataracts. I reckon this
getting older lark is a total swizz! It sure wasn't like this in the
brochure! ;O)


Take Care,
Gnube


ROFL

I'm just sitting back and letting it happen. Pointless fighting it. :-)

Now if only all my other machines, that I've made and fitted over the years,
would last as long as We all do. Then I'd be sitting back and letting it
happen in somewhere like Barbados or St' Tropez or anywhere warmer and
sunnier than good'ol blighty. But, I suppose I'll just have to stay here
and carry on repairing and replacing them for a few more years yet. (?)

And can anyone tell me why, after just a few months, I have caught myself
groaning loudly while I bend to pick up a tool from the floor. Why has this
just suddenly began to make a difference in bending over properly. I'm
starting to sound like a tennis player. :-))


---
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

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Old July 9th 03, 07:40 AM
Andrew McKay
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 01:07:10 GMT, "BigWallop"
wrote:

And can anyone tell me why, after just a few months, I have caught myself
groaning loudly while I bend to pick up a tool from the floor. Why has this
just suddenly began to make a difference in bending over properly. I'm
starting to sound like a tennis player. :-))


Nice to see I'm amongst friends - I'm a '56 kid as well

Actually I don't have a problem with the groaning whilst bending down.
The bit I can't quite come to terms with is that over the last couple
of years my feet seem to have got further away - only they look about
the same distance as they were before! Something odd going on
somewhere.....

Andrew

Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
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Old July 9th 03, 08:54 PM
Gnube
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 07:40:06 +0100, Andrew McKay
wrote:

On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 01:07:10 GMT, "BigWallop"
wrote:

And can anyone tell me why, after just a few months, I have caught myself
groaning loudly while I bend to pick up a tool from the floor. Why has this
just suddenly began to make a difference in bending over properly. I'm
starting to sound like a tennis player. :-))


Nice to see I'm amongst friends - I'm a '56 kid as well


A relatively rare bunch I think, not remotely sure why, just not that
many of us I've noticed, and females of that year rarest of all
(probably lying about it of course! ;O)

Actually I don't have a problem with the groaning whilst bending down.
The bit I can't quite come to terms with is that over the last couple
of years my feet seem to have got further away - only they look about
the same distance as they were before! Something odd going on
somewhere.....


To quote an old script, "you need leg lag - leg lag? Yes, leg lag! -
Neddy, get the Land Rover out and measure his legs!"

I don't know where the creaks and grinds come from, but they sure do
pop up more often lately! BTW, you got to know about this; those super
duper expensive knee guards from Screwfix are a seriously good
investment at 47 or there abouts! ;O) OK they may be the worst part of
30 but new knees are dearer and harder to fit - what a revelation
they were on the first outing - it was like being a kid again! ;O)


Take Care,
Gnube
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Old July 10th 03, 06:49 AM
BigWallop
 
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Default Concrete slab advice


"Gnube" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 07:40:06 +0100, Andrew McKay
wrote:

On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 01:07:10 GMT, "BigWallop"
wrote:

And can anyone tell me why, after just a few months, I have caught

myself
groaning loudly while I bend to pick up a tool from the floor. Why has

this
just suddenly began to make a difference in bending over properly. I'm
starting to sound like a tennis player. :-))


Nice to see I'm amongst friends - I'm a '56 kid as well


A relatively rare bunch I think, not remotely sure why, just not that
many of us I've noticed, and females of that year rarest of all
(probably lying about it of course! ;O)

Actually I don't have a problem with the groaning whilst bending down.
The bit I can't quite come to terms with is that over the last couple
of years my feet seem to have got further away - only they look about
the same distance as they were before! Something odd going on
somewhere.....


To quote an old script, "you need leg lag - leg lag? Yes, leg lag! -
Neddy, get the Land Rover out and measure his legs!"

I don't know where the creaks and grinds come from, but they sure do
pop up more often lately! BTW, you got to know about this; those super
duper expensive knee guards from Screwfix are a seriously good
investment at 47 or there abouts! ;O) OK they may be the worst part of
30 but new knees are dearer and harder to fit - what a revelation
they were on the first outing - it was like being a kid again! ;O)


Take Care,
Gnube


Knee pads are always top of the list Gnube, especially if you're a groveller
like me. :-)) I never leave home without 'em. I use a big cushion at home
because no one sees me at home, but out in wild world, I put knee pads on.
Knee pads, glasses, a hat to keep me head warm, arse hanging out the back of
the jeans, old steel toe capped boots on and a thermos flask, and I wonder
why younger women aren't attracted to me.

What I have been noticing this year past, is my toe and finger nails seem to
be needing trimmed more often, and I don't know if it's ageing that's doing
it, or if I'm turning into a werewolf. (?) Well, that's me for nowoo woo
woo woo woo. :-))


---
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.498 / Virus Database: 297 - Release Date: 08/07/03


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Old July 10th 03, 08:37 AM
Andrew McKay
 
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Default Concrete slab advice

On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 05:49:08 GMT, "BigWallop"
wrote:

Knee pads are always top of the list Gnube, especially if you're a groveller
like me. :-)) I never leave home without 'em. I use a big cushion at home
because no one sees me at home, but out in wild world, I put knee pads on.
Knee pads, glasses, a hat to keep me head warm, arse hanging out the back of
the jeans, old steel toe capped boots on and a thermos flask, and I wonder
why younger women aren't attracted to me.


I've been having some problems recently with my jeans slipping down
when I bend over and stand up, and they need rehoisting. One day last
week they fell right down, exposing my undies - I hasten to add that I
was at home indoors so no old ladies swooning at the sight!

This seems to have something to do with the fact with my middle-age
spread in my midriff makes the body-to-jeans interface into a negative
slope, and the jeans tend towards gravity.

I've now solved the problem though - a decent pair of trouser braces.

Andrew

Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk


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