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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are seeking confirmation?
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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 13/06/2021 04:50 pm, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


It is known as the "rising inflection" or "high rising terminal".

It does seem to be characteristic of (some) Australians, but has been
spreading among young and presumably impressionable people in the UK
over the last few decades (possibly because of the prevalence of
Australian soap opera on TV) and in the USA (West Coast, mainly) before
that.

AIUI, linguists do indeed associate the tendency with persons lacking in
social power, authority and confidence and thereby, a lack of
self-esteem. By changing the intonation of a statement into that of a
question, they are constantly seeking reassurance and approval.

There's a reasonable discussion of it at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal
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Default CAUTION!!! Birdbrain, the Abnormal Pathological Attention Whore, Strikes, AGAIN!

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 16:50:35 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (aka "Commander Kinsey",
"James Wilkinson", "Steven ******","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.),
the pathological resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs,
blathered again:

FLUSH the subnormal sociopathic trolling attention whore's latest
attention-baiting sick bull**** unread again

--
francis about Birdbrain (now "Commander Kinsey" LOL):
"He seems to have a reputation as someone of limited intelligence"
MID:

--
Peter Moylan about Birdbrain (now "Commander Kinsey" LOL):
"If people like JWS didn't exist, we would have to find some other way to
explain the concept of "invincible ignorance"."
MID:

--
Lewis about nym-shifting Birdbrain:
"Typical narcissist troll, thinks his **** is so grand he has the right to
try to force it on everyone."FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest
troll**** unread
MID:
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Default Troll-feeding Senile ASSHOLE Alert!

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:00:29 +0100, JNugent, another demented, notorious,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blathered again:


It is known as the "rising inflection" or "high rising terminal".


Nope, senile asshole, it is known as TROLLING and your idiotic senile
feedback is known as TROLL-FEEDING! Capisci?
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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


I think a sentence like "I saw Helen (?) in Tesco (?) and she said that she
and James (?) were expecting a baby." (where "(?)" denotes a rising tone)
there is an implied "You know Helen, don't you?", "You know where Tesco is,
don't you?" and "You've met James, haven't you?" - as if the speaker is
constantly seeking confirmation that the listener knows who/what the speaker
is talking about.

It's referred to as "up-talk" (because the pitch goes up at the end of each
clause/sentence) and it's said to have come across to the UK either from
West Coast USA or from Australian soaps such as Neighbours.



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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 6/13/21 12:50 PM, NY wrote:
"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and
are seeking confirmation?


I think a sentence like "I saw Helen (?) in Tesco (?) and she said that
she and James (?) were expecting a baby." (where "(?)" denotes a rising
tone) there is an implied "You know Helen, don't you?", "You know where
Tesco is, don't you?" and "You've met James, haven't you?" - as if the
speaker is constantly seeking confirmation that the listener knows
who/what the speaker is talking about.

It's referred to as "up-talk" (because the pitch goes up at the end of
each clause/sentence) and it's said to have come across to the UK either
from West Coast USA or from Australian soaps such as Neighbours.


35 years ago (?) a Canadian co-worker(?) in Utah(?)spoke like this (?).

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Default Troll-feeding Senile ASSHOLE Alert!

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:50:06 +0100, NY, the really endlessly blathering,
notorious, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered, yet again:


I think


Are you sure, troll-feeding senile asshole? Senilely sure? BG
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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:00:29 +0100, JNugent wrote:

On 13/06/2021 04:50 pm, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


It is known as the "rising inflection" or "high rising terminal".

It does seem to be characteristic of (some) Australians, but has been
spreading among young and presumably impressionable people in the UK
over the last few decades (possibly because of the prevalence of
Australian soap opera on TV) and in the USA (West Coast, mainly) before
that.

AIUI, linguists do indeed associate the tendency with persons lacking in
social power, authority and confidence and thereby, a lack of
self-esteem. By changing the intonation of a statement into that of a
question, they are constantly seeking reassurance and approval.


Thought so, and I'm thankful you've reassured me others think the same :-)

There's a reasonable discussion of it at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal

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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:59:19 +0100, wrote:

On 6/13/21 12:50 PM, NY wrote:
"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and
are seeking confirmation?


I think a sentence like "I saw Helen (?) in Tesco (?) and she said that
she and James (?) were expecting a baby." (where "(?)" denotes a rising
tone) there is an implied "You know Helen, don't you?", "You know where
Tesco is, don't you?" and "You've met James, haven't you?" - as if the
speaker is constantly seeking confirmation that the listener knows
who/what the speaker is talking about.

It's referred to as "up-talk" (because the pitch goes up at the end of
each clause/sentence) and it's said to have come across to the UK either
from West Coast USA or from Australian soaps such as Neighbours.


35 years ago (?) a Canadian co-worker(?) in Utah(?)spoke like this (?).


I like to respond with "why are you asking me, it's you telling the story".
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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:50:06 +0100, NY wrote:

"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


I think a sentence like "I saw Helen (?) in Tesco (?) and she said that she
and James (?) were expecting a baby." (where "(?)" denotes a rising tone)
there is an implied "You know Helen, don't you?", "You know where Tesco is,
don't you?" and "You've met James, haven't you?" - as if the speaker is
constantly seeking confirmation that the listener knows who/what the speaker
is talking about.


And is very irritating. If you're saying something and you're unsure of several pieces of knowledge in the other person's mind, you're doing it wrong.

It's referred to as "up-talk" (because the pitch goes up at the end of each
clause/sentence) and it's said to have come across to the UK either from
West Coast USA or from Australian soaps such as Neighbours.



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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 13/06/2021 16:50, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?

bollox
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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

No its called a dialect.

Some people talk in monotones and sound a bit like a 20 year old speech
synth. Brian

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"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?



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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

And there was I thinking a high rising terminal was a computer in the lift
of a tower block.
Brian

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Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news
On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 17:00:29 +0100, JNugent
wrote:

On 13/06/2021 04:50 pm, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


It is known as the "rising inflection" or "high rising terminal".

It does seem to be characteristic of (some) Australians, but has been
spreading among young and presumably impressionable people in the UK
over the last few decades (possibly because of the prevalence of
Australian soap opera on TV) and in the USA (West Coast, mainly) before
that.

AIUI, linguists do indeed associate the tendency with persons lacking in
social power, authority and confidence and thereby, a lack of
self-esteem. By changing the intonation of a statement into that of a
question, they are constantly seeking reassurance and approval.


Thought so, and I'm thankful you've reassured me others think the same :-)

There's a reasonable discussion of it at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal



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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote

No its called a dialect.


Nope, dialects are different.

Some people talk in monotones and sound
a bit like a 20 year old speech synth.


Neither of those are dialects.

Commander Kinsey wrote


Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence?
It sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians
are particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and
are seeking confirmation?




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Default Troll-feeding Senile Blind MOLE Alert!

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 07:39:28 +0100, Brainless & Daft, the notorious,
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:

And there was I thinking a high rising terminal was a computer in the lift
of a tower block.
Brainless & Daft


Just what kind of a driveling, retarded, troll-feeding senile asshole are
you, Brainless & Daft?
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Default Troll-feeding Disgusting Senile Blind MOLE Alert!

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 07:34:17 +0100, Brainless & Daft, the notorious,
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:

No its called a dialect.


No, Brainless, it's called a TROLL, you handicapped troll-feeding senile
cretin!


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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 14/06/2021 08:25 am, Rod Speed wrote:

Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote


No its called a dialect.


Nope, dialects are different.


Indeed they are and this affectation is NOT a dialect.

I have a relative in Liverpool - a university student - who affects this
style (probably semi-consciously). Although away from the city these
last forty-five years, I can tell the world that the Australian rising
inflection *never* formed part of any of the various Liverpool accents.
it is entirely learned from the media over the last thirty to forty years.

Some people talk in monotones and sound a bit like a 20 year old
speech synth.


Neither of those are dialects.


Correct.

Commander Kinsey wrote


Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians
are particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say
and are seeking confirmation?



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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 13/06/2021 16:50, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence?


Because they went to Band Camp?

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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 13/06/2021 17:00, JNugent wrote:

snipped

On 13/06/2021 04:50 pm, Commander Kinsey wrote:

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and
are seeking confirmation?


It is known as the "rising inflection" or "high rising terminal".


Or the 'Antipodean Interrogative".

--
Cheers
Clive


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Default Troll-feeding Senile ASSHOLE Alert!

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 12:08:06 +0100, R D S, another mentally deficient
troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:

On 13/06/2021 16:50, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence?


Because they went to Band Camp?


Why do you answer retarded questions, senile idiot?
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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 12:06:57 +0100, JNugent
wrote:


On 14/06/2021 08:25 am, Rod Speed wrote:


Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote



No its called a dialect.



Nope, dialects are different.


Indeed they are and this affectation is NOT a dialect.

I have a relative in Liverpool - a university student - who affects this
style (probably semi-consciously). Although away from the city these
last forty-five years, I can tell the world that the Australian rising
inflection *never* formed part of any of the various Liverpool accents.
it is entirely learned from the media over the last thirty to forty years.


Some people talk in monotones and sound a bit like a 20 year old
speech synth.


Neither of those are dialects.


Correct.


Commander Kinsey wrote



Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians
are particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say
and are seeking confirmation?



I feel they are not so much asking a question, but implying "Are you
familiar with what I'm saying, because you may be old?"
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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 15:28:21 +0100, Dave W wrote:

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 12:06:57 +0100, JNugent
wrote:

On 14/06/2021 08:25 am, Rod Speed wrote:

Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote


No its called a dialect.


Nope, dialects are different.


Indeed they are and this affectation is NOT a dialect.

I have a relative in Liverpool - a university student - who affects this
style (probably semi-consciously). Although away from the city these
last forty-five years, I can tell the world that the Australian rising
inflection *never* formed part of any of the various Liverpool accents.
it is entirely learned from the media over the last thirty to forty years.

Some people talk in monotones and sound a bit like a 20 year old
speech synth.

Neither of those are dialects.


Correct.

Commander Kinsey wrote

Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians
are particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say
and are seeking confirmation?

I feel they are not so much asking a question, but implying "Are you
familiar with what I'm saying, because you may be old?"


It makes me think they're not sure what they just said is correct, and are waiting for you to say "uh-huh" after every phrase. Maybe they want to make sure you're paying attention.
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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

JNugent wrote:
Nope, dialects are different.


Indeed they are and this affectation is NOT a dialect.


It may not be a dialect, but I'm not sure that there's
any indication it's an affectation either:

affectation: speech or conduct not natural to oneself :
an unnatural form of behavior meant especially to
impress others.

However annoying you might find it, if it is a natural part
of the way they happen to speak, and not one chosen deliberately
by them, it isn't an affectation.

#Paul
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Default Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 14/06/2021 07:29 pm, #Paul wrote:

JNugent wrote:


[in response to:]
Nope, dialects are different.


Indeed they are and this affectation is NOT a dialect.


It may not be a dialect, but I'm not sure that there's
any indication it's an affectation either:

affectation: speech or conduct not natural to oneself :
an unnatural form of behavior meant especially to
impress others.


"behaviour"?

However annoying you might find it, if it is a natural part
of the way they happen to speak, and not one chosen deliberately
by them, it isn't an affectation.


They are copying it from others (whether in the media or in their peer
groups - or both). It hasn't arisen naturally and would not do so in a
country such as the UK


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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On 13/06/2021 16:50, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


The comedian Rory McGrath christened it the "moronic interrogative" back
in 2004. I've seen it referred to as that in The Times.

Another Dave

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Default Troll-feeding Senile ASSHOLE Alert!

On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 11:48:17 +0100, Another Dave, yet another brain dead
troll-feeding senile IDIOT, blathered


The comedian Rory McGrath christened it the "moronic interrogative" back
in 2004. I've seen it referred to as that in The Times.

Another Dave


Nope, senile asshole, it has been christened BAITING (practiced by retarded
trolls) which you retarded senile idiots gladly and thankfully succumb to,
every time! Yep, you ARE that retarded and senile! Try to "think" about it,
if your senility still allows you to do so.
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Default OT: Rise in pitch at the end of every sentence

On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 11:48:17 +0100, Another Dave wrote:

On 13/06/2021 16:50, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why do some people raise their voice at the end of every sentence? It
sounds like they're asking a question. Glaswegians and Australians are
particularly bad for it. Are they unsure of everything they say and are
seeking confirmation?


The comedian Rory McGrath christened it the "moronic interrogative" back
in 2004. I've seen it referred to as that in The Times.


An excellent description. Comedians are often the best to get the real answers.
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